UK: Five fishermen and two RNLI lifeboat crew were saved from the sea after a dramatic rescue off Shetland – Published 04 Mar 2017 1240z (GMT/UTC)

Five fishermen and two RNLI lifeboat crew were saved from the sea after a dramatic rescue when their trawler sank in bad weather.

(Image: RNLI)

(Image: RNLI)

The seven had to jump into the water just before the ship sank off Shetland as the sea was too rough to bring a lifeboat alongside. The alarm was raised at about 6.50am yesterday when the Lerwick-registered Ocean Way began taking on water. Lerwick RNLI lifeboat and the Coastguard search and rescue helicopter from Sumburgh both rushed to the scene. Two RNLI crew, one of whom often crews on Skerries-based Ocean Way, were transferred to the trawler with a salvage pump. But the skipper decided the trawler could not be saved. The five crew and two RNLI volunteers jumped into the water minutes before the trawler sank at 8.20am. They were picked up by the lifeboat, crewed by eight volunteers, and taken back to Lerwick. A Norwegian fish carrier, the Gerda Saele, had put a pump on board while the helicopter began winching a third pump on board, but Ocean Way’s skipper decided to abandon ship. The trawler crew were all wearing life jackets and had an Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon on board, pinpointing their position. Rescuers praised them for having the correct equipment. Lifeboat coxswain Alan Tarby said: “While the third pump was being winched on board the skipper decided to abandon ship and within minutes of him making that decision they got off and it sank, so it was a good call. “The rescue was made much easier because the Ocean Way’s crew were all wearing the correct safety equipment and had undergone safety training. “It was a good outcome even although the vessel was lost, all the crew were unharmed. The lifeboat crew performed very well, especially the two men who were in the water with the fishermen.” The fishermen were checked over by medics in Lerwick but did not need treatment. Mark Rodaway, commander for the UK Coastguard, said: “This was a difficult rescue in awful weather. In the conditions, the lifeboat had a difficult time trying to safely get alongside. “But I’m delighted to say that all five fishermen are safe and well and the fact they were all wearing life jackets ensured that they had the best chance of survival.”

RSOE March 04 2017 11:19 AM (UTC).

More here (inc video): http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-39151952

Angus the first named storm of autumn 2016 — Official blog of the Met Office news team

The Met Office has announced the first named storm of autumn 2016: Storm Angus. Storm Angus is expected to sweep through south-eastern England bringing some very strong south-westerly winds and heavy rain to affected parts through Sunday morning. Looking at the development of the low-pressure system, on Friday morning the Met Office issued a Yellow […]

via Angus the first named storm of autumn 2016 — Official blog of the Met Office news team

UK SEVERE WEATHER and FLOOD WARNINGS – Updated 16 Nov 2015 2330z (GMT/UTC)

==UK==

STORM BARNEY

SKYWARN

Severe Weather Alert #54 issued (See below)

Met Office Severe Weather Warnings:

Met Office Weather Warnings for mobile

Highlands & Eilean Siar Yellow Warning

Strathclyde Yellow Warning

London & South East England Yellow Warning

East Midlands Yellow Warning

North West England Yellow Warning

South West England Yellow Warning

Yorkshire & Humber Yellow Warning

Orkney & Shetland Yellow Warning

East of England Yellow Warning

Wales Yellow Warning

West Midlands Yellow Warning

North East England Yellow Warning

(For details follow above links)

 20 Flood Warnings in England and Wales – 6 in Scotland

at

22:52 on 16 Nov 2015 GMT

29 Flood Alerts in England and Wales – 5 in Scotland

at 

22:52 on 16 Nov 2015 GMT

( Check for interim updates in comments at bottom of page)

Severe Weather Warnings for Europe are now toward the bottom of the page

UK Visible Satellite (meteocentre.com)

UK Infra Red Satellite (meteocentre.com)

Weather Radar Europe (meteox.co.uk)

Channel Islands (Jersey) Weather Radar Latest Animation

Jersey Radar also covers much of South/South West of England & N France

CI weather warnings


SkyWarn UK’s mission is to forecast, report, and record severe weather.

SKYWARN UK CURRENT ALERT (Link)

Severe Weather Alert #54
SWUK has issued a Severe Weather Alert for strong winds in excess of 70mph
Valid from 1300hrs Tuesday 17th November to 0300hrs Wednesday 18th November.
for
South and South Western England & Wales
An easterly moving low pressure system (officially named ‘Barney’ by the MetO) will track across southern UK on Tuesday afternoon and evening.
Wind gusts could exceed SWUK criteria of 70mph along exposed coasts on the southern flank of the low.
Wales and the Bristol Channel could see gusts of 80mph
Spotters in the alert area are requested to report any breaches of SWUK criteria in the normal manner.

For details on SkyWarn UK’s alert criteria, click HERE.

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The latest Severe Weather Reports from TORRO can be found by following this link:

SEVERE WEATHER FORECAST

Report Severe Weather

Torro on Facebook

Latest news reports (see bottom of page)

BBC Weather

Monday

151116

Tuesday

151117

Wednesday

151118

UK Warnings

Warnings

Monday 16 November Published at 16:54

UK Warnings

Weather Warning

Issued by the Met Office

YELLOW WARNING OF WIND for NORTHWEST SCOTLAND

Issued at 10:35 on Mon 16 Nov

Valid from 11:00 on Mon 16 Nov

Valid until 23:55 on Mon 16 Nov

Southwesterly winds will increase during Monday, when severe gales will affect parts of the northwest mainland of Scotland, the Western Isles and Northern Isles. The strongest winds will initially develop across the Western Isles and northwest coast this afternoon before extending into the Northern Isles during the evening. Winds will quickly ease on Tuesday.

Gusts of wind of 65-75 mph are expected in places, so be aware that there may be some further disruption to travel. Additionally, large waves may cause some overtopping of sea defences.

This an update to the warning issued on Sunday morning.

Further updates will appear here.

YELLOW WARNING OF RAIN for NORTH WALES and NORTH ENGLAND

Issued at 10:23 on Mon 16 Nov

Valid from 10:00 on Tue 17 Nov

Valid until 23:45 on Tue 17 Nov

Further rain is expected on Tuesday as a frontal system runs across the UK from the west. The largest accumulations are expected across the hills of northwest England and northwest Wales though low lying areas will also see a period of heavy rain. On the southern side of this system some very strong winds are expected and a separate warning for winds is likely to be issued.

The public should be aware that, given the already saturated conditions, flooding is possible either from standing water or from rivers already swollen by recent rainfall. This could lead to disruption to travel and perhaps localised flooding to properties.

This is a further update to the warning originally issued on Friday, reducing the northern extent of the warning and moving into minor impacts.

Further updates will appear here.

YELLOW WARNING of WIND for much of WALES and SOUTHERN ENGLAND

Issued at 10:46 on Mon 16 Nov

Valid from 15:00 on Tue 17 Nov

Valid until 23:30 on Tue 17 Nov

West to southwesterly gales and locally severe gales are likely to sweep eastwards across parts of Wales, southern, central and eastern England later on Tuesday. Gusts could reach 60-70 mph inland and possibly 80 mph along exposed coasts, particularly Wales and through the Bristol Channel.

Be aware of the risk of disruption to travel and that gusts of this strength could bring down trees and lead to some damage to weakened structures.

Further updates will appear here.

YELLOW EARLY WARNING OF RAIN for NORTH WALES and NORTH ENGLAND

Issued at 12:17 on Sun 15 Nov

Valid from 16:00 on Wed 18 Nov

Valid until 23:45 on Wed 18 Nov

Another spell of heavy rain, accompanied by gale force winds in places, will cross the country on Wednesday, with largest rainfall over the high ground areas already saturated from recent wet weather. Up to 50 mm is expected in the wettest spots in North Wales and NW England.

The public should be aware of the potential for further impacts such as disruption to travel and local flooding.

Further updates will appear here.

When a warning is in force, full information can be found at Met Office Weather Warnings

Northern Ireland: Addition information available from https://www.facebook.com/northernirelandweather?fref=ts

Early Warnings will be issued more than 24 hours ahead of severe weather.

What is a Sudden Stratospheric Warming (SSW)?

Peter Gibbs explains sudden stratospheric warming and why it is often linked to outbreaks of cold weather: Sudden stratospheric warming

What is freezing fog?

UK RADAR AND SATELLITE

Surface Analyses & Observations UK and Europe

https://embed.windyty.com/?surface,wind,now,53.801,3.076,4,,menu,,

Animated map of global wind conditions

BE READY FOR BAD WEATHER and other emergencies – Advice and resources

News at bottom of page

FLOOD WARNINGS & ALERTS

There are NO SEVERE FLOOD WARNING currently in force in England & Wales at

22:52 on 16 Nov 2015 GMT

There are NO SEVERE FLOOD WARNINGS currently in force in Scotland at

22:52 on 16 Nov 2015 GMT

Flood Warning Flood Warning Flooding is expected. Immediate action required

There are 20 FLOOD WARNINGS currently in force in England & Wales at

22:52 on 16 Nov 2015 GMT

http://apps.environment-agency.gov.uk/flood/31618.aspx

There are 6 FLOOD WARNINGS currently in force in Scotland at

22:52 on 16 Nov 2015 GMT

Flood Alert Flood AlertFlooding is possible. Be prepared.

There are 29 FLOOD ALERTS currently in force in England & Wales at

22:52 on 16 Nov 2015 GMT

There are 5 FLOOD ALERTS currently in force in Scotland at

22:52 on 16 Nov 2015 GMT

About the Environment Agency Flood Warnings

The flood warnings are issued by the Environment Agency and the Scottish Environment Protection Agency and sent to the BBC Weather Centre, we then issue a compendium of warnings based on the latest information available. When severe flood warnings are issued they will also be highlighted on TV broadcasts.

Find out more about Flood Warnings

There are a number of ways you find out whether your area is at risk from flooding. Both the Environment Agency (for England and Wales) and the Scottish Environment Protection Agency update their warnings 24 hours a day via the Floodline number.

Floodline 0845 988 1188

Coastal Forecast

A 24 hour weather forecast for 24 UK coastal areas

Tide Tables

Tidal information supplied by the UK Hydrographic Office

Inshore Waters

There are strong wind warnings in 19 areas.

There is a gale warning in 1 area.

The next few days will be dominated by severeal areas of low pressure tracking across the British Isles bringing strong winds, large waves and changeable weather to all parts.

Shipping Forecast

There are gale warnings in 29 areas.

The general synopsis at midday

Low Bailey 964 expected Norwegian Basin 973 by midday tomorrow. New low expected Shannon 983 by same time.

Extended Outlook

The Extended Outlook aims to signpost expected hazards for the Cullercoats, Niton and Portpatrick areas for the three days beyond the 24 hour shipping forecast.

High Seas

There are storm warnings in 8 areas.

The general synopsis at 16 November 20:00 UTC

At 161200UTC low 60 north 13 west 964 expected 63 north 02 east 973 by 171200UTC. Low 48 north 39 west 987 expected 53 north 12 west 983 by same time. Low 50 north 20 west 998 losing its identity by that time. New low moving slowly east expected 53 north 32 west 988 by 171200UTC

Europe: Very dangerous weather – ESTOFEX Storm Forecast: LEVEL 3! for parts of POLAND and W BELARUS Damaging wind gusts, large and very hail, excessive precipitation and SIGNIFICANT TORNADO EVENT. – Published 190715 1216z

Storm Forecast

Storm Forecast
Valid: Sun 19 Jul 2015 06:00 to Mon 20 Jul 2015 06:00 UTC
Issued: Sun 19 Jul 2015 00:01
Forecaster: TASZAREK

A level 3 was issued for parts of Poland and W Belarus mainly for the damaging wind gusts, large and very hail, excessive precipitation and significant tornado event.

A level 2 was issued for parts of Germany, Poland, Belarus, NW Ukraine and N Czech Republic mainly for the severe wind gusts, large hail, tornadoes and excessive precipitation.

A level 1 was issued for parts of S Finland and parts of Russia mainly for the large hail and severe wind gusts.

A level 1 was issued for parts of UK, Netherlands, S Denmark, Germany, Switzerland, N Italy, Austria, Czech Republic, Slovakia, W Hungary, Belarus and NW Ukraine mainly for the large hail, severe wind gusts and excessive precipitation.

A level 1 was issued for NE Spain mainly for the large hail and excessive precipitation.

SYNOPSIS

Most of the Central, SW, S and SE Europe is covered with highly unstable warm and moist tropical air mass with dew points up to 20C. A ridge extending from Azores up to Iberian Peninsula inhibits convection in this region. Strong capping inversions are also present in the Apennine and most of the Balkan Peninsula. Weakening high is places over Black Sea while the numerous troughs are located over British Isles, Scandinavia and N Russia. Jet streak separating polar and tropical air mass is stretching from the N Atlantic trough England, N Germany and Poland up to Russia. Within this jet, a short-wave with thermal low is predicted to provide a good overlap of instability, moisture, lift and wind shear over parts of Germany, Poland and Belarus.

DISCUSSION

…Germany, Poland, Belarus, NW Ukraine…

Particularly severe weather is expected in the afternoon hours within the shortwave that will pass these countries in the forecast period and provide the great source of lifting mechanism. An overlap of SB CAPE exceeding 1000-2000 J/kg and DLS over 20-25 m/s in the large area extending from central Germany up to Poland is expected to produce widespread severe weather. Around noon, convection should start over Germany and most likely in the form of the supercell thunderstorms produce damaging wind gusts and large to very large hail. An increased 0-1km SRH over 100 m2/s2 and LLS exceeding 10 m/s cannot rule out tornado occurrence within these cells. In the afternoon hours CI should also take place in W Poland. Since these cells will form in the highly unstable (1500-2000 J/kg) and strongly sheared environment (DLS ~ 25 m/s, MLS ~ 20 m/s, LLS ~ 15 m/s, 0-3km SRH up to 300 m2/s2) with the support of the QG lift, an organized squall line is likely to form. It is likely that such a squall line will contain bow echos and the wind gusts within these may exceed 33 m/s. The transformation into derecho cannot be ruled out. Level 3 denote the area where according to the current understanding and NWP data the movement of this line is the most probable. However, models are not consistent with the direction of the MCS movement, some of them predicts propagation of the squall line to the Belarus, while some of them shifts the system more to the warm air mass. It is possible that an early-hours convection that will pass through N Poland may provide conditions more conducive for MCS turning more to the S. Due to these uncertainties, both scenarios are partially included in the level 3 area. Although the main threat are damaging wind gusts, conditions in the late afternoon hours (when the relative humidity will drop and thus the LCL) will be conducive for tornadoes, especially in the E Poland. An impressive overlap of 0-1km SRH ~ 400 m2/s2 with LLS ~ 12.5 m/s and CAPE ~ 1000 J/kg may result in a significant tornado event if isolated or embedded supercells will be present. These may be possible in the southern flank of the squall line. Within these storms very large hail is also possible. It is predicted that the MCS will enter Belarus and parts of Ukraine in the late evening hours and weaken, but still will be capable of producing severe wind gusts. If derecho will form, the system may be capable of producing damaging wind gusts also in the late evening hours, therefore level 3 is also extended to the parts of Belarus further east. Extreme values of PW (40-45 mm) may also result in a large precipitation amounts on the track of the MCS.

…parts of UK, Denmark, Netherlands, N Germany, Baltic Sea…

Although models predicts very large DLS over these areas (25-30 m/s) they are not as consistent with thermodynamic instability. Thunderstorms that will form within the short-wave may become supercells and create threat for the large hail and severe wind gusts. However, due to limited thermodynamic instability, limited boundary layers moisture content and rather low-topped convection, such a threat deserves only level 1.

…Germany, Switzerland, N Italy, Austria, Czech Republic, Slovakia, W Hungary, Belarus and NW Ukraine…

Locally enhanced DLS up to 15 m/s with CAPE up to 2000-2500 J/kg and rich boundary layer’s moisture (mixing ratio up to 12-13 g/kg) create threat for multicell and supercell thunderstorms where severe wind gusts and large hail are likely. DMC is forecast to start around noon and the storms should weaken in the late evening hours. In the areas where the storm motion is predicted to be very low (DLS below 10 m/s) excessive precipitation and local flash flooding cannot be ruled out, especially in the NW parts of the Italy.

…S Finland, parts of Russia…

Favorable overlap of DLS around 20 m/s and CAPE up to 400-600 J/kg create threat for supercell thunderstorms and thus severe wind gusts and large hail. Uncertainty related to CI, low thermodynamic instability, limited boundary layer’s moisture content and narrow zone where the CAPE overlaps with the favorable shear makes the threat marginal. The highest threat for the occurrence of severe weather falls on the early afternoon hours.

…NE Spain…

Low-level inflow of impressive rich boundary layer’s moisture content (mixing ratios up to 16-18 g/kg) overlapping with steep lapse rates (~ 7 C/km) locally will enhance CAPE values to 2000-2500 J/kg. If thunderstorms will be able to get through the cap, they may be capable of producing large hail. Since the storm motion in this area is predicted to be very low, given the high moisture content excessive precipitation cannot be ruled out.

END

See also >>>>  http://www.meteoalarm.eu/

Mesoscale Discussion

Mesoscale Discussion
Valid: Sun 19 Jul 2015 11:00 to Sun 19 Jul 2015 14:00 UTC
Issued: Sun 19 Jul 2015 11:51
Forecaster: GROENEMEIJER

At 11 UTC a warm front was located along a line from near Leipzig to Poznan to Warsaw. An MCS / area of convective rain over NE Germany has created an outflow boundary that stretches from Berlin to Leipzig.

Along the warm front distinct surface convergence is taking place and low-level humidity is rather high with 18-21 C observed dew points. With 26-30 C surface temperatures, around 1000 – 1500 J/kg of MLCAPE should already be in place.

The Bayreuth, Lindenberg and Doksany profilers and Poznan radar confirm that 20-25 m/s WSW winds are in place at 3-4 km AGL, implying that strong to very strong wind shear is present.

Storms, probably elevated have formed in the Leipzig area and further south across the Czech Republic. It is expected that these storms will move eastward and become surface based. It is possible that storms will rather rapidly develop into a squall-line and that the wind risk will increase rather quickly.

In addition, more storms may form further to the east along the warm front after 13 UTC. Any isolated storms that manage to form will quickly turn into powerful supercells with a risk of large hail and severe wind gusts.

The high (about 300 m2/s2) SREH and anticipated strengthening low-level shear that is in place along and slightly to the north of the warm front suggests that tornadoes cannot be ruled out. However, in most places, the LCL height is rather high for tornadoes with T/Td spreads around 10 C, limiting this risk. An exception is a small area along the warm front where prior rainfall occurrs before the arrival of storms, cooling and moistening the boundary layer.

END

Disasters Emergency Committee (@decappeal) Appeal for Nepal Earthquake – Deaths reach over 4,000, thousands injured & homeless

Nepal’s Devastating Earthquake Has Left More Than 4,000 Dead

SKY NEWS 16:01, UK, Monday 27 April 2015

A special programme as rescue teams continue to search for those buried in the rubble.
If video not playing go here: http://news.sky.com/video/1473149/nepal-earthquake-special-report

Our #Nepal Earthquake Appeal is now open. Donate here: #NepalQuake http://t.co/r3o1X0ZHkN http://t.co/fTNltlrj63

Please give as much as you can, here: http://www.dec.org.uk/?utm_source=Twitter&utm_medium=social%20media&utm_campaign=A017&utm_content=TweetsNepal/

UK: 5 fishermen rescued off the Hebredies after their boat Iuda Naofa sank – Published 200115 1815z (GMT/UTC)

The Coastguard was notified of a fishing vessel in distress just before 11am this morning. The Iuda Naofa, a 23m Irish fishing vessel, was taking on water 48 miles north of the Butt of Lewis.

The Coastguard Rescue helicopter was requested to attend the scene and drop a salvage pump onto the Iuda Naofa to pump off the ingress of water. However, the vessel became swamped and started to sink.

The Coastguard Rescue helicopter airlifted two of the crew onto the nearby sister fishing vessel, the Star of Hope. The other three crew were transferred by helicopter to the Western Isles hospital, where they are being treated for mild hypothermia.

Coastguard Duty Watch Manager, Paul Tunstall said

“The weather conditions on scene were very rough seas with southerly force 6 winds, evacuating the five crew swiftly and safely before the vessel went down was a great achievement.” –Maritime and Coastguard Agency

“Malin Head Coast Guard assisted in the saving of 5 fishermen off the Hebredies this afternoon. At about 1030 this morning Malin picked up a call for help on medium frequency 2182Khz for the Iuda Naofa taking water. Details taken and passed to MRCC Stornaway who sent out a helicopter. The boat sank. 3 crew airlifted and 2 taken onboard another boat Star of Hope. Only for the Listening watch the IRCG continue to hold on 2182Khz this could have easily ended with loss of life. This is the second 2182 call that Malin has dealt with in recent months both of which resulted in lives been saved. Well done lads.” –Irish Coast Guard

News Reports

BBC

Five rescued after fishing boat sinks off Isle of Lewis

Irish vessel Iuda Naofa

Five people were airlifted from the Irish vessel Iuda Naofa when it began to sink

Five crewmen have been rescued after a fishing boat started to sink off the Isle of Lewis.

The Irish vessel Iuda Naofa got into difficulty at about 11:00 when it started taking on water about 48 miles (77km) off the Butt of Lewis.

Stornoway Coastguard helicopter dropped a salvage pump to the crew, but the boat became swamped and started to sink.

Two crewmen were then airlifted to another boat and three to hospital.

The three have been treated at Western Isles Hospital for hypothermia.

The fishing boat has sunk.

Coastguard duty watch manager Paul Tunstall said: “The weather conditions on scene were very rough seas with southerly force 6 winds, evacuating the five crew swiftly and safely before the vessel went down was a great achievement.”

UK SEVERE WEATHER and FLOOD WARNINGS – Updated 27 Dec 2014 1433z (GMT/UTC)

Updated here:

https://goatysnews.wordpress.com/2015/01/08/uk-severe-weather-and-flood-warnings-updated-08-jan-2015-1203z-gmtutc/

Do not use any information on this site for life or death decisions. All information is intended as supplementary to official sources. Kindly refer to your country’s official weather agency/government website for local warnings, advisories and bulletins.

UK SEVERE WEATHER and FLOOD WARNINGS – Updated 11 Dec 2014 1343z (GMT/UTC)

Updated here:  https://goatysnews.wordpress.com/2014/12/26/uk-severe-weather-and-flood-warnings-updated-26-dec-2014-0830z-gmtutc/

Do not use any information on this site for life or death decisions. All information is intended as supplementary to official sources. Kindly refer to your country’s official weather agency/government website for local warnings, advisories and bulletins.

UK SEVERE WEATHER and FLOOD WARNINGS – Updated 27 Oct 2014 1422z (GMT/UTC)

Updated here: https://goatysnews.wordpress.com/2014/11/21/uk-severe-weather-and-flood-warnings-updated-21-nov-2014-1217z-gmtutc/

Do not use any information on this site for life or death decisions. All information is intended as supplementary to official sources. Kindly refer to your country’s official weather agency/government website for local warnings, advisories and bulletins.

UK SEVERE WEATHER and FLOOD WARNINGS – Updated 20 Aug 2014 1930z (GMT/UTC)

Updated here:

https://goatysnews.wordpress.com/2014/10/26/uk-severe-weather-and-flood-warnings-updated-26-oct-2014-0751z-gmtutc/

Do not use any information on this site for life or death decisions. All information is intended as supplementary to official sources. Kindly refer to your country’s official weather agency/government website for local warnings, advisories and bulletins.

UK SEVERE WEATHER and FLOOD WARNINGS – Updated 25 Aug 2014 1717z (GMT/UTC)

Updated here

http://wp.me/p2k2mU-3th

 

Do not use any information on this site for life or death decisions. All information is intended as supplementary to official sources. Kindly refer to your country’s official weather agency/government website for local warnings, advisories and bulletins.

UK: RNLI lifeguards at Polzeath rescued 32 people last night after they extended their patrol hours – Published 120814 1752z (GMT/UTC)

Lifeguards carry out rescues at Polzeath

RNLI Lifeguards carry out rescues at Polzeath (Credit: RNLI)

RNLI lifeguards at Polzeath rescued 32 people last night after they extended their patrol hours.

With a large number of people in the water and difficult conditions on the high spring tide, the lifeguard team stayed on past their normal finishing time of 6pm to ensure everybody was safe.

The lifeguard team, made up of Ben Miskowicz, Chris Rowlands, Phil Bartlett, Scott Temple, Christian Parker and Craig O’Rourke, were patrolling the beach yesterday (Monday 11 August) and when 6pm approached they realised the conditions were too dangerous to finish their lifeguard duties.

The team stayed on and rescued a total of 32 people, including seven swimmers and 25 bodyboarders, many of them children. They eventually packed down the beach at 7.30pm, an hour and a half after their normal operational finishing time.

Senior lifeguard Ben Miskowicz explains: ‘The conditions at Polzeath this week are particularly challenging, we have a high tide, strong onshore winds and large swell. The winter storms have changed the typography of Polzeath and now at high tide we have some rip currents at both the northern and southern end of the beach. The northern rip is particularly prominent at high tide at the moment and between 6pm and 7.15pm last night the lifeguards assisted 32 people who’d fallen off the bank of sand and straight into the path of the rip current.

‘I was at the cliff top unit at the south end of the beach and Chris was at the northern end while Craig, Phil and Christian were in the water on rescue boards. As we had a higher view we were able to spot casualties and guide the lifeguards in the water to them. I could see how strong the rip was, when the lifeguards stopped paddling on the rescue board they were pulled away very quickly, it was incredibly strong.’

Today is the highest tide of the year, with high tide at Polzeath at 7.15pm, so lifeguards are urging people to take extra care in the conditions.

Chris Wafer, RNLI lifeguard supervisor, said: ‘The lifeguard team did a fantastic job last night in challenging conditions and received praise from many members of the public for their efforts in keeping people safe.

‘We’ve seen strong onshore winds and a big swell combined with spring tides in recent days which have created these difficult conditions. With another large tide tonight it’s possible the lifeguard team may stay on later again to ensure everybody is safe. If you are heading to the beach please speak to the lifeguards to find out the hazards and take heed of their advice.’

To help keep children safe in the sea this summer, the RNLI has partnered with the ASA to offer Swim Safe. Providing free open-water swimming improver lessons to children aged between 7-14, the programme is running at Bude throughout the summer. For more information go to http://www.swimming.org/go/parents/swim-safe/

– RNLI

  • Date:
    12/08/2014
  • Author: Emma Haines

The RNLI added in a Facebook post:

“32 people were rescued at Polzeath beach in Cornwall last night – after lifeguards extended their patrol hours. With their 6pm finish time approaching, and a large number of people still in the water and a high spring tide, the team realised the conditions were too dangerous for them to leave their post. When people began to get caught in the path of a rip current, the lifeguards were able to leap into action. This week sees some of the highest tides of the year, so if you’re visiting the coast, remember to ‪#‎RespectTheWater‬ and visit a lifeguarded beach where possible. ”

Key facts about the RNLI

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution is the charity that saves lives at sea. Our volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland from 236 lifeboat stations, including four along the River Thames and inland lifeboat stations at Loch Ness, Lough Derg, Enniskillen and Lough Ree. Additionally the RNLI has more than 1,000 lifeguards on over 180 beaches around the UK and operates a specialist flood rescue team, which can respond anywhere across the UK and Ireland when inland flooding puts lives at risk.

The RNLI relies on public donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. As a charity it is separate from, but works alongside, government-controlled and funded coastguard services. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824 our lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved at least 140,000 lives. Volunteers make up 95% of the charity, including 4,600 volunteer lifeboat crew members and 3,000 volunteer shore crew. Additionally, tens of thousands of other dedicated volunteers raise funds and awareness, give safety advice, and help in our museums, shops and offices.

Learn more about the RNLI

For more information please visit the RNLI website or Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. News releases, videos and photos are available on the News Centre.

Contacting the RNLI – public enquiries

Members of the public may contact the RNLI on 0300 300 9990 or by email.

 

The RNLI is a charity registered in England and Wales (209603) and Scotland (SC037736). Charity number CHY 2678 in the Republic of Ireland

 

UK: Ex Bertha bringing wet and windy weather on Sunday, says Met Office – Published 080814 1719z (GMT)

#UK #SEVERE #WEATHER, #FLOOD WARNINGS and #TORRO #TORNADO WATCH. #Bertha #UKstorm #FloodAware #Wx #News… http://t.co/fIcYIK4jr5

— Goaty’s News (UK) (@Goatys_News) August 9, 2014

8 August 2014 – The remnants of Hurricane Bertha will continue to track towards the UK during the next few days.

“The Met Office has been assessing the likelihood of the UK seeing any effects from Bertha by using our own forecast models alongside models from other world-leading forecast centres.

At the moment southern parts of the UK look as though they are most at risk during Sunday, followed by areas of northeast Scotland on Monday. However, there is also the possibility that the depression could move across northern France as a weak feature.

Bertha storm tracks Possible storm tracks for ex Bertha on Sunday   Bertha Impacts Likely impacts from ex Bertha on Sunday

The transition of Bertha from a tropical to an extra-tropical feature is a particularly hard one to forecast but there is increasing confidence that this feature will affect the UK on Sunday, though with very large uncertainty remaining over the track and intensity.

Chief Meteorologist, Paul Gundersen, said: “There is still some uncertainty surrounding this weekend’s weather, with the potential for heavy rainfall, strong coastal winds and large waves on Sunday. However, there is still a chance that the system may pass to the south of the country giving the UK a brighter day.

“Rain and strong winds may well bring disruption, especially across southern parts of the UK, with the potential for more than 50 mm of rain and coastal gusts of over 60 mph. People should stay up to date with the latest Met Office warnings.”

Craig Woolhouse, Environment Agency Flood Risk Manager, said: “Heavy rain on Sunday may lead to localised surface water flooding in some parts of England and Wales. On Sunday and Monday a combination of high spring tides and strong westerly winds bring a risk of large waves and spray and possible flooding to the south west coast of England and along the Severn Estuary. However, the forecast remains uncertain so we advise people to regularly check the flood risk situation over the next few days.

“If you’re travelling to or from holiday then check your flood risk before setting off and don’t drive through flood waters.

“The Environment Agency is continuing to monitor the situation closely along with the Met Office and local authorities. People can sign up to receive free flood warnings, check their flood risk and keep up to date with the latest situation on the GOV.UK website to  check if you are at risk of flooding or follow @EnvAgency and #floodaware on Twitter for the latest flood updates.”

Jeremy Parr, Head of Flood Risk Management, Natural Resources Wales, said: “Our officers will be monitoring forecasts closely over the weekend as the situation in Wales becomes clearer but in the meantime we are advising people to remain alert.

“We are likely to see some very heavy rain on Sunday into Monday, and combined with strong winds and high spring tides, conditions along the coast could be dangerous.  As the forecast remains unsettled, we are advising people to keep an eye on weather forecasts and check the latest flood alerts on our website.”

Ross Macloed,  RNLI Coastal Safety Manager, said: “Extreme wave heights combined with high tides can make some normal coastal activities we take for granted significantly more risky; the force of surging water or breaking waves can easily knock you over and quickly drag you out of your depth and once in the water it can be difficult to get out. As little as one cubic metre of water weighs a tonne and shows that you should never underestimate how powerful the sea can be.

“If you are planning a coastal activity, our advice is to respect the water, and watch the shore from a safe distance and assess the conditions; think about the risk before deciding if  you need to go closer.”

Met Office records show that there are similar examples of intense low pressure systems occurring in August, for example, the 24 August 2005 where an active storm sat off the northwest coast of Scotland bringing strong winds and heavy rain. On the 30 August 1992 a depression swung up from the southwest across the UK giving a wet and windy Bank Holiday weekend.

We will be keeping an eye on the latest outlook for the weather over the next few days and the progress of ex Bertha to keep everyone up to date with the latest information.

Last updated: 8 August 2014″ –  Met Office

Met Office Weather Warnings for mobile

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Ex Bertha more likely to miss UK

 

Official blog of the Met Office news team

Tropical Storm Bertha is currently off the north east coast of the US and is likely to become an ‘extra tropical storm’ on Thursday.

It’s then expected to track across the Atlantic – and while there are still a number of possible outcomes, it looks increasingly likely that the UK will miss any serious impacts from ‘ex Bertha’.

The Met Office has been assessing the likelihood of the UK seeing any effects from Bertha by using our own forecast model alongside models from other world-leading forecast centres.

Map shows likely storm track for ex Bertha by midday Sunday. Map shows likely storm track for ex Bertha by midday Sunday.

At the moment the majority of forecasts from those models suggest ex Bertha will track to the south of the UK as a relatively weak low pressure system.

In fact it’s debatable whether this is even ex Bertha, as the storm declines to such an extent as it comes across the Atlantic…

View original post 195 more words

US/Canada: Tropical Storm Bertha 051500Z near 34.8N 71.9W, moving NNE at 19 knots (NHC) – Updated 050814 1520z (UTC)

Tropical Storm Bertha

…BERTHA WEAKENS A LITTLE MORE….

SURF…SWELLS GENERATED BY BERTHA WILL AFFECT PORTIONS OF THE COASTS
OF NORTH AND SOUTH CAROLINA TODAY AND TONIGHT…..NHC

BERTHA NOW EAST OF THE CAROLINAS MOVING NORTHEASTWARD –
EXPECTED TO TRACK OFFSHORE – COULD AFFECT EASTERN NEWFOUNDLAND
WITH RAIN LATE WEDNESDAY INTO THURSDAY – CHC

(Image: wunderground.com) 5 day forecast (Click image for source)

(Image: wunderground.com) Satellite (Click image for source)

National Weather ServiceNational Hurricane Center

[Image of 3-day forecast and coastal areas under a warning or a watch]

Coastal Watches/Warnings and 3-Day Forecast Cone for Storm Center

000
WTNT33 KNHC 051453
TCPAT3

BULLETIN
TROPICAL STORM BERTHA ADVISORY NUMBER 19
NWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL AL032014
1100 AM EDT TUE AUG 05 2014

…BERTHA WEAKENS A LITTLE MORE…
SUMMARY OF 1100 AM EDT…1500 UTC…INFORMATION
———————————————-
LOCATION…34.8N 71.9W
ABOUT 445 MI…715 KM WNW OF BERMUDA
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS…60 MPH…95 KM/H
PRESENT MOVEMENT…NNE OR 25 DEGREES AT 22 MPH…35 KM/H
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE…1006 MB…29.71 INCHES
WATCHES AND WARNINGS
——————–
THERE ARE NO COASTAL WATCHES OR WARNINGS IN EFFECT.
DISCUSSION AND 48-HOUR OUTLOOK
——————————
AT 1100 AM EDT…1500 UTC…THE CENTER OF TROPICAL STORM BERTHA WAS
LOCATED NEAR LATITUDE 34.8 NORTH…LONGITUDE 71.9 WEST. BERTHA IS
MOVING TOWARD THE NORTH-NORTHEAST NEAR 22 MPH…35 KM/H….AND A
TURN TOWARD THE NORTHEAST AND EAST-NORTHEAST WITH INCREASING FORWARD
SPEED IS EXPECTED OVER THE NEXT 48 HOURS.

MAXIMUM SUSTAINED ARE NEAR 60 MPH…95 KM/H…WITH HIGHER
GUSTS. SLOW WEAKENING IS FORECAST DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS.

TROPICAL STORM FORCE WINDS EXTEND OUTWARD UP TO 125 MILES…205 KM
FROM THE CENTER…MAINLY TO THE EAST.

THE ESTIMATED MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE IS 1006 MB…29.71 INCHES.
HAZARDS AFFECTING LAND
———————-
SURF…SWELLS GENERATED BY BERTHA WILL AFFECT PORTIONS OF THE COASTS
OF NORTH AND SOUTH CAROLINA TODAY AND TONIGHT. THESE SWELLS ARE
LIKELY TO CAUSE LIFE-THREATENING SURF AND RIP CURRENT CONDITIONS.
PLEASE CONSULT PRODUCTS FROM YOUR LOCAL WEATHER OFFICE.
NEXT ADVISORY
————-
NEXT COMPLETE ADVISORY…500 PM EDT.

$$
FORECASTER PASCH

 

CANADA

Hurricane Track Information

Hurricane Track Information

Canadian Hurricane Centre symbol Legend

Icon for a tropical cyclone with maximum sustained surface winds of 37 to 62 kilometres per hourTropical Depression

Icon for a tropical cyclone with maximum sustained surface winds of at least 118 kilometres per hourHurricane

Icon for a tropical cyclone with maximum sustained surface winds of 63 to 117 kilometres per hourTropical Storm

Icon for a storm system that used to be tropical but has since lost most of its tropical characteristicsPost-Tropical Storm

An example showing a Hurricane icon with three parameters; maximum wind 120 Kilometers per hour; local time and day 15:00 Thu/jeu; and the storm name Andrea.

Visit the Canadian Hurricane Centre to learn more about hurricanes.

WOCN31 CWHX 051145
TROPICAL CYCLONE INFORMATION STATEMENT UPDATED BY THE CANADIAN
HURRICANE CENTRE OF ENVIRONMENT CANADA AT 9:00 AM ADT TUESDAY
5 AUGUST 2014.
———————————————————————
TROPICAL CYCLONE INFORMATION STATEMENT FOR:
NEWFOUNDLAND
NOVA SCOTIA.

FOR TROPICAL STORM BERTHA.

THE NEXT STATEMENT WILL BE ISSUED BY 3:00 PM ADT.

BERTHA NOW EAST OF THE CAROLINAS MOVING NORTHEASTWARD –
EXPECTED TO TRACK OFFSHORE – COULD AFFECT EASTERN NEWFOUNDLAND
WITH RAIN LATE WEDNESDAY INTO THURSDAY.

———————————————————————
==DISCUSSION==
1. SUMMARY OF BASIC INFORMATION AT 9.00 AM ADT.

LOCATION: 34.3 NORTH 72.2 WEST.

ABOUT 730 KILOMETRES WEST-NORTHWEST OF BERMUDA.

MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS: 100 KM/HOUR.

PRESENT MOVEMENT: NORTHEAST AT 35 KM/HOUR.

MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE: 1005 MB.

2. PUBLIC WEATHER IMPACTS AND WARNINGS SUMMARY.

ALL INDICATIONS ARE THAT BERTHA WILL PASS SOUTH OF NOVA SCOTIA WITH
JUST SOME HIGH CLOUD-COVER FROM IT MOVING OVERHEAD. THERE IS A
POSSIBILITY THAT RAIN FROM THE POST-TROPICAL PHASE OF THE STORM COULD
AFFECT THE AVALON PENINSULA OF NEWFOUNDLAND. SOME UNCERTAINTY
REMAINS WITH REGARD TO THE PROXIMITY OF THE TRACK TO THE AVALON
DUE TO A TROUGH OF LOW PRESSURE THAT MAY INTERACT WITH THE STORM.

A. WIND.

THE STRONGEST WINDS ASSOCIATED WITH THE STORM WILL LIKELY REMAIN
OFFSHORE. HOWEVER THERE IS A SMALL CHANCE THAT WINDS COULD AFFECT
SOUTHEASTERN NEWFOUNDLAND EARLY THURSDAY IF THE TROUGH MENTIONED
ABOVE PLAYS A GREATER ROLE IN THE STORM’S TRANSFORMATION.

B. RAINFALL.

RAINFALL IS MORE LIKELY TO AFFECT SOUTHEASTERN NEWFOUNDLAND THAN
WIND. AT THIS POINT AMOUNTS OF 25 TO 50 MILLIMETRES ARE POSSIBLE
IF THE RAIN MOVES OVER LAND. MORE INFORMATION WILL BECOME AVAILABLE
IN THIS REGARD LATER TODAY.

C. SURGE/WAVES.

THERE WILL BE SOME OCEAN SWELLS ALONG THE ATLANTIC COAST OF NOVA
SCOTIA ESPECIALLY LATER WEDNESDAY INTO THURSDAY MORNING WHEN WAVE
HEIGHTS NEAR 2 METRES ARE EXPECTED. NEWFOUNDLAND WILL LIKELY SEE
SOME OCEAN SWELLS AS WELL ON THURSDAY. LARGE WAVES GIVING POUNDING
SURF MAY REACH 4 METRES FOR SOUTHERN NEWFOUNDLAND WITH MUCH LARGER
WAVES EXPECTED OFFSHORE. THERE IS ALSO A RISK OF RIP CURRENTS ALONG
SOUTH- AND EAST-FACING BEACHES AS THE OCEAN SWELLS ARRIVE.

3. MARINE WEATHER IMPACTS AND WARNINGS SUMMARY.

STORM WARNINGS HAVE BEEN ISSUED FOR PARTS OF EAST SCOTIAN SLOPES AND
LAURENTIAN FAN. GALE WARNINGS HAVE BEEN ISSUED FOR THE REST OF THE
SOUTHERN MARITIMES MARINE WATERS. BERTHA WILL ALSO BRING GALE FORCE
WINDS TO SOUTHERN AND EASTERN NEWFOUNDLAND WATERS. ANTICIPATE
STORM-FORCE WINDS OVER THE SOUTHERN GRAND BANKS.

VISIT weatheroffice.gc.ca/hurricane (ALL IN LOWER CASE) FOR THE
LATEST:

– FORECAST POSITION, CENTRAL PRESSURE TABLE.

– STRENGTH AND PREDICTED WIND RADII TABLE.

– HURRICANE TRACK INFORMATION MAP.

– TECHNICAL DISCUSSION.

PLEASE ALSO REFER TO THE PUBLIC AND MARINE FORECASTS AND WARNINGS
ISSUED BY ENVIRONMENT CANADA FOR YOUR AREA.

END/COUTURIER/FOGARTY
_______________________________________________
http://www.atl.ec.gc.ca/weather/hurricane/subscription_join_e.html

Technical Discussion

 

 

TSR logoN Atlantic: Storm Alert issued at 5 Aug, 2014 15:00 GMT

Tropical Storm BERTHA (AL03) currently located near 34.8 N 71.9 W is forecast to strike land to the following likelihood(s) at the given lead time(s):

Yellow Alert Country(s) or Province(s)
    Canada
        probability for TS is 65% in about 45 hours
Yellow Alert City(s) and Town(s)
    St John’s (47.6 N, 52.7 W)
        probability for TS is 65% in about 69 hours

Note that
Yellow Alert (Elevated) is CAT 1 or above to between 10% and 30% probability, or TS to above 50% probability.
CAT 1 means Hurricane strength winds of at least 74 mph, 119 km/h or 64 knots 1-min sustained.
TS means Tropical Storm strength winds of at least 39 mph, 63 km/h or 34 knots 1-min sustained.

For graphical forecast information and further details please visit http://www.tropicalstormrisk.com/

Storm Tracker Map

Storm Tracker Map

Tropical Storm BERTHA: Storm-centered zoom at 117 hours lead (TSR) Updated 1511 UTC

Storm Tracker Map
Tropical Storm BERTHA: Probability of tropical storm winds to 117 hours lead – TSR Updated 1511 UTC

MARITIME/SHIPPING

Graphicast Atlantic

CANADA: Marine Weather Warnings

METAREA4 / HURRICANE_ADVISORY / 1432

WTNT23 KNHC 051432
TCMAT3

TROPICAL STORM BERTHA FORECAST/ADVISORY NUMBER 19
NWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL AL032014
1500 UTC TUE AUG 05 2014

THERE ARE NO COASTAL WATCHES OR WARNINGS IN EFFECT.

TROPICAL STORM CENTER LOCATED NEAR 34.8N 71.9W AT 05/1500Z
POSITION ACCURATE WITHIN 25 NM

PRESENT MOVEMENT TOWARD THE NORTH-NORTHEAST OR 25 DEGREES AT 19 KT

ESTIMATED MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE 1006 MB
MAX SUSTAINED WINDS 50 KT WITH GUSTS TO 60 KT.
50 KT……. 40NE 40SE 0SW 0NW.
34 KT…….110NE 100SE 20SW 20NW.
12 FT SEAS..120NE 180SE 90SW 90NW.
WINDS AND SEAS VARY GREATLY IN EACH QUADRANT. RADII IN NAUTICAL
MILES ARE THE LARGEST RADII EXPECTED ANYWHERE IN THAT QUADRANT.

REPEAT…CENTER LOCATED NEAR 34.8N 71.9W AT 05/1500Z
AT 05/1200Z CENTER WAS LOCATED NEAR 34.1N 72.6W

FORECAST VALID 06/0000Z 37.1N 69.2W
MAX WIND 50 KT…GUSTS 60 KT.
50 KT… 40NE 40SE 0SW 0NW.
34 KT…120NE 120SE 20SW 20NW.

FORECAST VALID 06/1200Z 39.8N 64.5W
MAX WIND 50 KT…GUSTS 60 KT.
50 KT… 40NE 40SE 0SW 0NW.
34 KT…120NE 150SE 60SW 20NW.

FORECAST VALID 07/0000Z 42.5N 59.5W…POST-TROP/EXTRATROP
MAX WIND 50 KT…GUSTS 60 KT.
50 KT… 0NE 90SE 0SW 0NW.
34 KT…120NE 180SE 150SW 60NW.

FORECAST VALID 07/1200Z 45.0N 53.0W…POST-TROP/EXTRATROP
MAX WIND 45 KT…GUSTS 55 KT.
34 KT…150NE 240SE 180SW 90NW.

FORECAST VALID 08/1200Z 49.0N 40.0W…POST-TROP/EXTRATROP
MAX WIND 45 KT…GUSTS 55 KT.
34 KT…240NE 240SE 180SW 180NW.

EXTENDED OUTLOOK. NOTE…ERRORS FOR TRACK HAVE AVERAGED NEAR 150 NM
ON DAY 4 AND 200 NM ON DAY 5…AND FOR INTENSITY NEAR 15 KT EACH DAY

OUTLOOK VALID 09/1200Z 49.0N 22.0W…POST-TROP/EXTRATROP
MAX WIND 45 KT…GUSTS 55 KT.

OUTLOOK VALID 10/1200Z 51.0N 2.0W…POST-TROP/EXTRATROP
MAX WIND 45 KT…GUSTS 55 KT.

REQUEST FOR 3 HOURLY SHIP REPORTS WITHIN 300 MILES OF 34.8N 71.9W

NEXT ADVISORY AT 05/2100Z

$$
FORECASTER PASCH

METAREA4 / HIGH_SEAS_FORECAST / 1010

FZNT01 KWBC 051010
HSFAT1

HIGH SEAS FORECAST FOR METAREA IV
NWS OCEAN PREDICTION CENTER WASHINGTON DC
1030 UTC TUE AUG 05 2014

CCODE/1:31:04:01:00/AOW/NWS/CCODE
SUPERSEDED BY NEXT ISSUANCE IN 6 HOURS

SEAS GIVEN AS SIGNIFICANT WAVE HEIGHT…WHICH IS THE AVERAGE
HEIGHT OF THE HIGHEST 1/3 OF THE WAVES. INDIVIDUAL WAVES MAY
BE MORE THAN TWICE THE SIGNIFICANT WAVE HEIGHT

SECURITE

NORTH ATLANTIC NORTH OF 31N TO 67N AND WEST OF 35W

SYNOPSIS VALID 0600 UTC AUG 05
24 HOUR FORECAST VALID 0600 UTC AUG 06
48 HOUR FORECAST VALID 0600 UTC AUG 07

.WARNINGS.

…TROPICAL STORM WARNING…
.24 HOUR FORECAST TROPICAL STORM BERTHA NEAR 38.6N 66.9W.
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS 50 KT GUSTS 60 KT. TROPICAL STORM FORCE
WINDS WITHIN 120 NM E SEMICIRCLE AND 30 NM W SEMICIRCLE. SEAS 12
FT OR GREATER WITHIN 120 NM N SEMICIRCLE…AND 180 NM SE AND 150
NM SW QUADRANTS WITH SEAS TO 26 FT.
.48 HOUR FORECAST POST-TROPICAL BERTHA NEAR 44.1N 56.4W. WITHIN
30 NM NE AND 90 NM SE QUADRANTS WINDS 35 TO 50 KT. SEAS 18 TO 23
FT. ELSEWHERE WITHIN 150 NM NE…180 NM SE…150 NM SW…AND 60
NM NW QUADRANTS WINDS TO 25 TO 35 KT. SEAS 9 TO 18 FT.

…GALE WARNING…
.LOW E OF AREA 60N34W 996 MB MOVING SE 10 KT. OVER FORECAST
WATERS WITHIN 300 NM W SEMICIRCLE WINDS 25 TO 40 KT. SEAS 11 TO
18 FT.
.24 HOUR FORECAST LOW E OF AREA 57N27W 1000 MB. WITHIN 360 NM SW
AND 480 NM NW QUADRANTS WINDS TO 25 KT. SEAS TO 10 FT.
.48 HOUR FORECAST LOW AND ASSOCIATED CONDITIONS E OF AREA.

.SYNOPSIS AND FORECAST.

.24 HOUR FORECAST EXCEPT AS NOTED WITH TROPICAL STORM BERTHA
FROM 30N TO 40N BETWEEN 64W AND 73W WINDS 20 TO 33 KT. SEAS 8 TO
12 FT.
.48 HOUR FORECAST POST-TROPICAL BERTHA DESCRIBED IN WARNINGS
SECTION ABOVE.

.DENSE FOG. VSBY OCCASIONALLY LESS THAN 1 NM FROM 56N TO 61N
BETWEEN 55W AND 60W.
.24 HOUR FORECAST DENSE FOG FROM 55N TO 61N BETWEEN 56W AND 61W.
.48 HOUR FORECAST DENSE FOG OVER FORECAST WATERS W OF A LINE
FROM 62N63W TO 60N54W TO 52N50W.

.HIGH 34N34W 1024 MB MOVING E 15 KT.
.24 HOUR FORECAST HIGH E OF AREA.

.HIGH 34N57W 1024 MB MOVING E 10 KT.
.24 HOUR FORECAST HIGH 34N52W 1022 MB.
.48 HOUR FORECAST HIGH DISSIPATED.

.HIGH 55N44W 1015 MB MOVING NW 10 KT.
.24 HOUR FORECAST HIGH 58N45W 1018 MB.
.48 HOUR FORECAST HIGH 58N45W 1021 MB.

.HIGH 51N55W 1017 MB MOVING SE 15 KT.
.24 HOUR FORECAST HIGH 48N48W 1018 MB.
.48 HOUR FORECAST HIGH 47N41W 1018 MB.

.FORECASTER BELL. OCEAN PREDICTION CENTER.

NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL

ATLANTIC FROM 07N TO 31N W OF 35W INCLUDING CARIBBEAN SEA AND
GULF OF MEXICO

SYNOPSIS VALID 0600 UTC TUE AUG 05.
24 HOUR FORECAST VALID 0600 UTC WED AUG 06.
48 HOUR FORECAST VALID 0600 UTC THU AUG 07.

.WARNINGS.

…TROPICAL STORM WARNING…
.TROPICAL STORM BERTHA NEAR 33.4N 72.9W 1005 MB AT 0900 UTC AUG
05 MOVING NNE OR 015 DEG AT 19 KT. MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS 55 KT
GUSTS 65 KT. TROPICAL STORM FORCE WINDS WITHIN 30 NM W
SEMICIRCLE…110 NM NE QUADRANT AND 100 NM SE QUADRANT. SEAS 12
FT OR GREATER WITHIN 150 NM E SEMICIRCLE…180 NM SW QUADRANT
AND 120 NM NW QUADRANT WITH SEAS TO 25 FT. ELSEWHERE OVER
FORECAST WATERS N OF 27N BETWEEN 70W AND 78W S TO SW WINDS 20 TO
33 KT. SEAS TO 11 FT. FROM 26N TO 28N BETWEEN 75W AND 79W S TO
SW WINDS 20 TO 25 KT. SEAS TO 8 FT.
.24 HOUR FORECAST TROPICAL STORM BERTHA NEAR 38.6N 66.9W.
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS 50 KT GUSTS 60 KT. TROPICAL STORM FORCE
WINDS WITHIN 120 NM E SEMICIRCLE AND 30 NM W SEMICIRCLE.
CONDITIONS N OF FORECAST AREA. OVER FORECAST WATERS N OF 29N
BETWEEN 70W AND 75W SW WINDS 20 TO 25 KT. SEAS TO 9 FT.
.48 HOUR FORECAST POST-TROPICAL EXTRATROPICAL BERTHA NEAR 44.1N
56.4W. MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS 50 KT GUSTS 60 KT. TROPICAL STORM
FORCE WINDS WITHIN 150 NM NE AND SW QUADRANTS…60 NM NW
QUADRANT AND 180 NM SE QUADRANT. CONDITIONS N OF FORECAST AREA.
.72 HOUR FORECAST POST-TROPICAL EXTRATROPICAL BERTHA NEAR 48.5N
44.0W. MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS 45 KT GUSTS 55 KT. EXTENDED
OUTLOOK…USE FOR GUIDANCE ONLY…ERRORS MAY BE LARGE.
.96 HOUR FORECAST POST-TROPICAL EXTRATROPICAL BERTHA NEAR 49.3N
28.0W. MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS 45 KT GUSTS 55 KT.
.120 HOUR FORECAST POST-TROPICAL EXTRATROPICAL BERTHA NEAR 50.3N
14.5W. MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS 45 KT GUSTS 55 KT.

FORECAST WINDS IN AND NEAR ACTIVE TROPICAL CYCLONES SHOULD BE
USED WITH CAUTION DUE TO UNCERTAINTY IN FORECAST TRACK…SIZE
AND INTENSITY.

.SYNOPSIS AND FORECAST.

.ATLC S OF 22N BETWEEN 71W AND 74W E WINDS 20 TO 25 KT. SEAS
TO 8 FT.
.12 HOUR FORECAST WINDS 20 KT OR LESS. SEAS LESS THAN 8 FT.

.ATLC FROM 13.5N TO 21N BETWEEN 51W AND 62W WINDS 20 KT OR LESS.
SEAS TO 8 FT IN E SWELL.
.24 HOUR FORECAST WINDS 20 KT OR LESS. SEAS LESS THAN 8 FT.

.CARIBBEAN FROM FROM 11N TO 13N BETWEEN 73W AND 76W NE TO E
WINDS 25 TO 30 KT. SEAS 9 TO 12 FT. ELSEWHERE FROM 11N TO 15N
BETWEEN 71W AND 76.5W NE TO E WINDS 20 TO 25 KT. SEAS TO 9 FT.
FROM 15N TO 17.5N BETWEEN 70W TO 74W NE TO E WINDS 20 TO 25 KT.
SEAS TO 8 FT. REMAINDER OF AREA FROM 10.5N TO 14N BETWEEN 76W
AND 78W WINDS 20 KT OR LESS. SEAS TO 8 FT IN E SWELL.
.24 HOUR FORECAST FROM 10.5N TO 14N BETWEEN 70W AND 77W NE TO E
WINDS 20 TO 25 KT. SEAS TO 9 FT. ELSEWHERE FROM 11N TO 16N
BETWEEN 71W AND 78W WINDS 20 KT OR LESS. SEAS TO 8 FT IN E SWELL.
.36 HOUR FORECAST WINDS 20 KT OR LESS. SEAS LESS THAN 8 FT.
.48 HOUR FORECAST FROM 11.5N TO 14N BETWEEN 68W AND 74W NE TO E
WINDS 20 TO 25 KT. SEAS TO 8 FT.

$$
.FORECASTER STRIPLING. NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER.

 

PassageWeather is a FREE sailing weather website:

http://www.passageweather.com

Do not use any information on this site for life or death decisions. All information is intended as supplementary to official sources. Kindly refer to your country’s official weather agency/government website for local warnings, advisories and bulletins.

 

 

UK: Public warned about the dangers of ‘tombstoning’ – Published 080714 2115z

Police, Coastguards and councils are warning the public about the dangers of ‘tombstoning’ in Dorset.

 

Young thrillseekers have been putting their lives at risk by jumping into the sea from a great height – often from the top of cliffs.

 

There have been reports of youngsters jumping off the East pier at West Bay, narrowly missing boats coming in and out of Bridport Harbour.

 

Tombstoning can be dangerous for a number of reasons: water depth alters with the tide and it may be shallower than it seems, submerged objects like rocks may not be visible, the shock of cold water may make it difficult to swim and strong currents can rapidly sweep people away.

 

PC Scott McGregor of Bridport Police, said: “We have had several reports over the last few months, where concerns have been raised by the public about the activity of people jumping off the pier at West Bay. On one occasion colleagues attended to prevent individuals from putting themselves and boat users in the harbour at risk.”

 

Nic Lonsdale, Duty Watch Manager for Portland Coastguard, said: “Jumping from piers, cliffs, rocks or other structures into the sea can be very dangerous.

 

“What was a deep pool at lunchtime might be a shallow puddle by teatime due to tidal conditions and you do not know what other hazards might be under the surface.

 

“According to the Coastguard database, since 2005 there have been 20 deaths and 76 serious injuries caused by tombstoning in the UK.”

 

Cllr Robert Gould, Leader of West Dorset District Council, said: “Bridport has a very active harbour with boats moving in and out on a regular basis, we strongly advise people against this activity as it is both irresponsible and potentially dangerous.”

 

Figures from the Maritime and Coastguard Agency show that in the past five years, seven people have been badly hurt from tombstoning in Dorset.

 

To report a dangerous incident along the coastline, please call 999 and ask for the Coastguard. – MCA

End

Videos

(Not directly related to West Bay)

(Video credit: Kent Police)

This video aims to deter people from being seriously injured, often fatally, each year through tombstoning. The video was produced with the help of local school children and features Sonny Wells, a young man who was paralysed after jumping from a jetty in Hampshire in 2008.

(Video credit: Sunday Sun)

(Video credit: swimmer39274)

UK: London hero plunged into River Thames to save distressed man – Praised by Tower RNLI Lifeboat crew – Published 070714 1845z

A have-a-go hero plunged into the River Thames this morning to help a man who moments earlier had jumped from a bridge at the start of the capital’s rush hour.

London crew praise ‘good Samaritan’, Ben Corr, who entered river to save distressed man 07 July 2014 (Photo credit: Ben Corr via RNLI)

 Lifeboat crew members from the Royal National Lifeboat Institution launched just after 7am today after reports from London Coastguard that a man was in the River Thames, drifting dangerously close to the base of the London Eye attraction

The lifeboat crew arrived just moments later to find that two men were in the water; one had entered the river to help another man who it is believed had deliberately jumped from the pedestrian footpath alongside Charing Cross rail bridge.

Ben Corr, a 36 year old statistician, had been running to work on the South Bank when he was flagged down by a woman. He took up the story: ‘The lady was quite shaken up – she was pointing to a man in the river and said she’d just seen him jump from the bridge. She was clutching a life ring but wanted some help in throwing it out to him.

‘I did try but he was quite far out and the ring missed him. Despite our efforts to coerce him towards it, he was just flailing in the water. At first I held back because I know the emergency services always advise the public not to enter the water in times like that, in case they get into danger as well. But after a moment I decided I had to – so I climbed down onto the foreshore, entered the river, and swam across to him.’

Ben said the man was very distressed and was pushing him away at first, but eventually agreed to take the life ring: ‘I pulled him back to the south bank wall but there was no way to get out. The woman who had stopped me explained that she had called the police and barely a minute later the lifeboat crew arrived.’

Tower lifeboat crew – consisting of helmsmen Craig Burn and Stuart Morrison, and volunteer Jenny Barnett – pulled both men aboard and returned to Tower

Tower RNLI Lifeboat crew – Pictured (left to right) are Stuart Morrison, Craig Burn, and Jenny Barrett (Credit: RNLI/James Oxley)

RNLI lifeboat station, situated beneath Waterloo Bridge. Craig said: ‘We got them as they were floating down by the base of the London Eye. There is some machinery there and we were concerned about them floating close to that, but we got to them in time.

‘We met with our ambulance service colleagues back at the station and they treated the man who had entered from the bridge. He was cold and shaken and still distressed, and was taken away by ambulance crews for further treatment.

‘Ben stayed with us for a short while and we gave him blankets and lots of tea and biscuits. Ben is right that we don’t advise people to go into the water to help people, but he assessed the situation and made a measured, very brave decision to go in. What he did was hugely commendable and we take our hat – or helmet – off to him: there is one man out there today in London who would surely have lost his life if it hadn’t been for Ben and the lifeboat crew.’

(Video credit: RNLI)

Published on Jul 7, 2014

Running along the South Bank this morning, Ben Corr was expecting a normal Monday in the office. That changed when he was alerted to a man struggling in the Thames. After trying to throw a life ring to the casualty, Ben carefully weighed up the situation & made the decision to go in and swim to the casualty. Meanwhile, Tower lifeboat crew had been alerted & were heading up river. They found both men floating near the London Eye and safety pulled them on board. We don’t advise people to carry out rescues themselves, but Ben made a very measured and selfless decision to go in – and for that we take our hat off to him – RNLI

UK: Summer Solstice 2014 – Stonehenge – Published 210614 0900z

SUMMER SOLISTICE 2014

Photo: Summer solstice sunrise over the Stonehenge prehistoric monument in Wiltshire, England – @ST0NEHENGE (via breakingnews.com)

AN estimated 36,000 people in the UK have seen the sun rise at Stonehenge on the longest day in the northern hemisphere, with 25 arrested, largely for drugs-related offences.

THE summer solstice has a long tradition of attracting people to monuments such as Stonehenge, where latter-day Druids gather to witness the sun rising on the longest day.

“We are pleased that the solstice celebrations at Stonehenge and Avebury have been enjoyable events for the majority of people attending,” a police spokesman said.

“There were 25 arrests at Stonehenge and two at Avebury which were mainly for drug-related offences.

“This year we estimate 36,000 people visited the stones throughout the night. There is always a small proportion of people who will try to break the law but I am satisfied that this was a successful policing operation.” – ntnews.com.au

Summer Solstice 2014: Stonehenge Druid Explains Traditions and History of Pagan Event

“Summer solstice for Druids is an event that celebrates the cycles of the universe, with traditions dating back thousands of years.

Frank Somers, from the Amesbury and Stonehenge Druids, has been attending summer solstice at Stonehenge for more than a decade.

Speaking to IBTimes UK, he explained: “Druids believe that everything in existence is interconnected. The fundamental belief is that energy, the stuff we’re made of, our spirits, are part of a continuum that makes up the whole universe. We’re both unique individuals and part of something bigger.

“Everything in nature goes in cycle. A big part of the Druid thinking is there’s this cycle called the year, which fundamentally affects everything we do – when we can grow our food and when we have to hide away next to the fire. If you turn up at the changes between the seasons and observe that change, you can become better attuned to those cycles in yourself and you’re a part of them.”

Summer solstice is when the sun is at its highest point and the longest day of the year. Winter solstice is the opposite – marking the shortest day and the sun being at its lowest on the horizon. Both are cause for celebration, Somers said.

“Each season has its positives – winter season is about family and community, and the darkness, with the cold and the wet and the snow – it cleanses the land ready for a new season of growth. The summer is all to come. Even though the days are getting shorter the Earth’s temperature is increasing and you’ve got the whole summer culminating in harvest, which everyone is looking forward to.

“What you’re celebrating on a mystical level is that you’re looking at light at its strongest. It represents things like the triumph of the king, the power of light over darkness, and just life – life at its fullest.”

Stonehenge Druid traditions

Somers explained some of the traditions that take place among Druids on summer solstice. To begin, he said all Druids will want to be under the open sky – most will gather in small groups of family or friends, so those attending ceremonies at sites such as Stonehenge are the “tip of the iceberg”.

However, explaining the significance of the Neolithic site, he said: “Druids that gather at ancient places do it specifically so that they’re part of the continuum with the ancestors. When you do it at Stonehenge, you’re in the same place for the same reasons as people 5,000 years ago – in a place they marked out as special that they picked out to meet up and do these observances. You become part of something much bigger than we are.”

At Stonehenge there is a sunset ceremony for people who arrive on time. Following this, Druids get into a circle to process around the stones three times as a way of acknowledging the sacredness of the site and as a means of introducing themselves.

As morning approaches, Druids find a spot to set up small circles, which is then opened by one person – called casting the circle – who declares it to be a sacred gathering. They then call to the elements, starting with mother earth in the north, air in the east, fire in the south and water in the west. The elements are symbols of energy. They also call to the shining ones of legend, the fairy folk, to be present and any bright spirits including the ancestors and the great ones.”

After a speech and any announcements people want to make, the Druids turn to face the direction of the rising sun and raise their hands. A drum is beaten slowly to start before picking up speed as the sun rises.

“At the first glance of the sun people cheer. Traditionally the druids blow horns and there is then a chant, where you are raising energy and focusing it from the circle and radiate out around the world – it’s a group prayer, not high magic or anything. Sometimes we recite the Druid’s prayer. We close the circle by saying thank you to the spirits and the gods that have been present with us and say farewell to them.”

Explaining the significance and majesty of Stonehenge, he added: “When you walk inside, the stones seem enormous. It’s almost like you’re stood in a street in New York, you get this sense of them towering over you.

“We think Stonehenge is a sacred place that links the Earth, the Moon and the Sun and the seasons. It’s a place designed to draw people to it and the place would have always been there to teach people and give them a ceremony with which to celebrate what’s going on and be a part of it all – much more than just being a tourist monument.” –  ibtimes

Will Self: has English Heritage ruined Stonehenge?

The summer solstice, King Arthur, the Holy Grail … Stonehenge is supposed to be a site of myths and mystery. But with timed tickets and a £27m visitor centre, does it herald a rampant commercialisation of our heritage?
Read more: guardian.com

BBC  The science of the summer solstice

Families across Britain enjoy the longest day of the year on Friday 21 June. It is the summer solstice of 2013.

We get the most hours of daylight because of the position of the Earth in relation to the Sun.

But the solstice does not necessarily fall on the same day each year. And in some parts of the world the Sun does not set at all.

While it is the day that has the most sunlight, Britain’s weather typically does not become hotter until later in the summer.

Experts from five UK universities explain the science of the solstice.

What makes the solstice the longest day of the year?

Our planet does not spin on a vertical axis. It is titled at 23.4 degrees.

This means the amount of sunlight that reaches different regions of the Earth changes during the year as it orbits the Sun.

“Our summer solstice in the northern hemisphere is the point in the Earth’s orbit when the North Pole is most inclined towards the Sun,” says Manchester University’s Dr Tim O’Brien, Associate Director at Jodrell Bank Observatory.

“The axis is tipped 23.4 degrees towards the plane of the Earth’s orbit.

“Over the year the North Pole can be tipped towards the sun – summer in the northern hemisphere, or away from it, which is winter.”

This tilt changes the path we see the sun take across the sky.

“On the summer solstice, the sun rises at its farthest point around the eastern horizon,” adds Dr O’Brien.

“At noon the sun is as high above the horizon as it will ever get, and it sets at its farthest point around the west.

“So daylight lasts longer than on any other day in the year.”

Earth's axis tilts 23.4 degrees

Why doesn’t the sun set in some parts of the world?

Around the time of the summer solstice areas of Norway, Finland, Greenland, Alaska and other polar regions experience ‘midnight sun’.

In the Arctic Circle the sun does not set at all. Again it comes down to the tilt of the earth’s axis.

“The sun shines on the hemisphere of Earth that faces it,” says Coel Hellier, Professor of Astrophysics at Keele University. “Our summer solstice is the point in Earth’s orbit when the North Pole tilts most directly towards the sun.”

“The polar regions are continually illuminated and there is 24-hour daylight throughout the Arctic Circle. This is down to a latitude 23 degrees from the pole, matching the angle of Earth’s tilt.”

While the north enjoys constant daylight the opposite occurs at the South Pole.

“When the Northern hemisphere is tilted towards the sun the Southern Hemisphere is tilted away,” adds Prof Hellier. “Anyone in the Antarctic Circle would experience 24-hour darkness.”

Why is Australia’s summer solstice in December?

While June 21 is the summer solstice in Britain, for Australia and countries in the southern hemisphere this date marks the winter solstice.

“They have their summer solstice in the middle of our winter,” says Martin Hendry, Professor of Gravitational Astrophysics at Glasgow University.

“Oceans act as huge storage heaters and absorb heat all through the summer” – Dr Simon Boxall

“It comes in late December when their part of the Earth is leaning most towards the Sun.”

Seasons are determined by the 23.4 degree tilt in the Earth’s axis.

“Midway between the summer and winter solstices the axis is neither leaning directly towards, nor directly away from the Sun,” adds Prof Hendry.

“We refer to these dates as the ‘Equinoxes’ – when the Sun spends about the same amount of time above and below the horizon.

“In the northern hemisphere the spring equinox occurs around March 21 and the autumn equinox around September 21.

“This is when the length of day and the length of night are about equal everywhere on the Earth.”

Earth's orbit of the Sun

Why doesn’t Britain get hotter until later in summer?

The northern hemisphere has the longest hours of sunlight around the solstice. But Britain usually sees higher temperatures in July and August.

It comes down to the way our planet retains heat.

Callanish Stones, Isle of Lewis
  • The four seasons of the year are caused by the 23.4 degree tilt in the Earth’s axis.
  • The longest hours of sunlight come at the time of the June solstice for the northern hemisphere.
  • The seas around Britain store heat, bringing warmer temperatures later in summer.

The oceans, atmosphere and the land all receive solar radiation,” says Dr Simon Boxall, Lecturer in Oceanography at Southampton University.

“It provides over 99 per cent of the heat on the surface of Earth.

“The atmosphere and land can respond quickly to changes. If the earth was ocean free we would expect maximum temperatures closer to midsummer’s day.

“But over 70 per cent of the planet is ocean, and water takes a while to warm up and cool down.”

This effect is noticeable in Britain because we are surrounded by sea.

“The oceans act as huge storage heaters absorbing heat all through the summer,” adds Dr Boxall. “Think about how long it takes to boil a pan of water and how long it stays warm afterwards.

“The oceans around us hit their peak usually at the end of August or beginning of September.”

Why doesn’t the solstice fall on the same day each year?

The summer solstice falls on June 21 in 2013, but the exact time changes each year. And every leap year it comes on June 20.

“A year of 365 days is only how we humans have chosen to divide time into convenient chunks,” says Dr Somak Raychaudhury, Reader in Astrophysics at Birmingham University.

Changing times of the solstice

The solstice falls around six hours later each year, until a leap year when it jumps back to June 20.

  • 2013 June 21 05:04
  • 2014 June 21 10:51
  • 2015 June 21 16:38
  • 2016 June 20 22:34 – Leap year
  • 2017 June 21 04:24
  • 2018 June 21 10.07
  • 2019 June 21 15:54
  • 2020 June 20 21:44 – Leap year

“The average duration of a year is approximately 365 days five hours 48 minutes and 45 seconds.

“Even this varies by a few seconds every year, since the Earth’s motion is not just caused by the Sun’s pull of gravity.

“It is perturbed by the pull of the planets and moons in the Solar System. The relative positions of these change from year to year.”

This means the solstice occurs around six hours later every year.

To resolve the difference between our calendar year and the actual time it takes the Earth to orbit the sun, we add an extra day at the end of February every four years.

“This makes the June solstice jump back to the previous date for each leap year,” adds Dr Raychaudhury.

Midsummer celebrations have been held in Britain at the time of the solstice for thousands of years.

Ancient stone circles like Stonehenge are still the focal point for such ceremonies today.

Videos

Stonehenge Summer Solstice Sunrise 2014

(Video credit:stonehengetours)

Stonehenge Summer Solstice 2013 – Updated latest 2014

(Video credit: Breaking Australian)

Secrets of Stonehenge – Documentary

(Video credit:The Historian )

UK: RNLI Littlehampton lifeguards rescue mother and daughter being swept out to sea – Published 160614 1933z

RNLI lifeguards at Littlehampton today carried out their first rescue of the season when a mother and daughter where swept out to sea whilst using an inflatable.

The drama occurred this afternoon (Saturday 14 June) as temperatures soared into the twenties and hundreds of visitors flocked to the South coast’s beaches.

RNLI lifeguard Brittany Jones, working her first season with the charity at Littlehampton East beach, spotted two women – a mother and her daughter – struggling with their inflatable in a strong offshore breeze.

Noticing they were in difficulty, Brittany quickly sprung into action and paddled out to the pair on her rescue board.

Once she reached them, she was able to check they were okay, and then keep them afloat whilst lifeguards from Littlehampton West Tim Walton and Dan Seagrove Castle launched the inshore rescue boat to bring them all safely to shore.

Brittany said: ‘It was a busy day on the beach, but I spotted the two women just outside of the lifeguard zone and they looked like they were having trouble getting back to shore.

‘It’s situations like this where your training really kicks in. Thankfully, it was a happy ending, but we would advise all those visiting a beach to stay in an area where the lifeguards can see you, and if in danger, call for help immediately.’

Once they were brought ashore, the two women were checked over by the lifeguards before continuing with their day.

RNLI lifeguards will patrol the beaches at Littlehampton until 7 September.

The RNLI offers a free Beach Finder app for those heading to the coast, where users can search for their nearest lifeguarded beach, check tide times and get live weather updates. Download from your App store or visit http://bit.ly/LqSiFD for more info – RNLI

UK: London Thames pleasure boat in collision with Tower Bridge. 10 injured – Published 040614 1400z

File:Tower Bridge (aerial view).jpg

Tower Bridge (aerial view) Bob Collowan, CC-BY-SA-3.0, Wikimedia Commons (Click image for more about Tower Bridge)

London lifeboat crew treat injured as Thames cruiser collides with Tower Bridge

Lifeboat crew members from the RNLIs Tower lifeboat station have treated a woman with a head wound after a River Thames city cruiser collided with Tower Bridge.

The lifeboat crew, based below Waterloo Bridge, were tasked by London Coastguard shortly after midday today (Wednesday) after the City Cruises vessel Millennium Diamond was involved in the collision.

The woman, believed to be in her 60s, is believed to have fallen down a set of steel steps, sustaining a head injury and bruises to her ribs.

The lifeboat crew were the first on scene and treated the womans head wound until London Ambulance Service paramedics arrived and took her away for further treatment.

Kevin Maynard, one of the four Tower RNLI lifeboat crew members on the lifeboat, explained how the drama unfolded: We launched just after midday and when we arrived the boat had come alongside St Katherines Pier by Tower Bridge. We understand the woman had been standing at the top of some steel steps when the collision happened and the impact knocked her down.

Although the original call to us was related to that one lady, while we were on scene a further nine people came forward to say they had been injured. We treated the woman by giving her oxygen and using blankets to keep her warm, as well as dressing her wound and placing her on a board to protect her spine. We looked after her until London Ambulance Service arrived to take her away for further assessment.

The lifeboat crew consisted of helmsman Kevin Maynard as well as David Norman, Craig Burns, and volunteer life boatman Neil Withers.

The crew are currently remained on scene to assist where necessary (correct as at 1.50pm)

Tower RNLI is one of three London lifeboat stations serving the entire length of the Thames from the estuary up to Teddington Lock. The RNLI remains a charity that relies on donations and voluntary contributions for its lifesaving work. RNLI

My Photo INCIDENT AT TOWER BRIDGE

London Coastguard is coordinating the response to an incident on the Thames in which a pleasure boat, the Millennium Diamond, was in collision with Tower Bridge.

10 people are believed to be injured.

Emergency services and the RNLI are on the scene.

Other Reports

A City Cruises boat collided with the south pier of Tower Bridge this lunchtime. MPS Marine Policing Unit attended the scene andreported that two people were injured.

The boat docked at St Katharines pier and one passenger was removed on a stretcher and taken to hospital while the other was treated ashore. Minor damages to the vessel are reported.

Tower Bridge remains open to pedestrians and road traffic. –http://londonist.com

More inc photos athttp://londonist.com/2014/06/city-cruises-vessel-collides-with-tower-bridge.php?showpage=2#gallery-1

 

UK: 2,400 teens prepare for annual 2-day Ten Tors Challenge/Jubilee Challenge across Dartmoor – Published 050514 1720z

Image from Ten Tors website

Spring has sprung

Official blog of the Met Office news team

Warmer, drier weather is on the way for parts of the country.  As we move through the week a north–south divide develops across the UK with Scotland, Northern Ireland, northern England and parts of Wales being changeable and windy. However in the south high pressure will dominate  bringing dry weather for the weekend, with the best of the weather in the Southeast.

Temperatures are expected to reach mid to high teens in the South this weekend (8th – 9th March), while northwest England and Scotland are likely to see spells of strong winds and rain and there is a risk of overnight frosts.

This is in sharp contrast to the record breaking winter we have just experienced.  It was the wettest winter for the UK, England, Wales and Scotland, and the second wettest winter for Northern Ireland in the record series dating from 1910. It was the stormiest…

View original post 138 more words

The RNLI ‘Respect the Water’ campaign

National Water Safety

Despite the best efforts of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution’s volunteer crews and lifeguards –  Did you know that around 150 people still lose their lives around the UK coast each year, and around 80% are men?

….And are you aware that cold water shock occurs in water less than 15 degrees, but the average UK sea temperature is just 12?

You may also be surprised to know that just one metre cubed of water weighs a tonne, and that is not a lot of water. Although as water safety professionals some of this may seem obvious, our research shows that many of those most at risk underestimate such facts, and therefore put themselves in situations of increased and unnecessary risk.

These findings underpinned a new RNLI coastal safety campaign called ‘Respect the Water’ last summer to help raise awareness about dangers of drowning and general risks around the coast. The…

View original post 295 more words

The Order of St John and Mountain Rescue?

heavywhalley

I bet few who use the Outdoors know about the wonderful work of the Order Of St John and its incredible assistance to Mountain Rescue in Scotland? Hope fully after reading this you may have an idea of what work they have done.

Order of st John Logo

This is the copy of a letter I wrote to the Order when I retired from Mountain Rescue. Firstly please accept my sincere apologies for not writing before to thank you for all your great work for the Mountain Rescue Committee of Scotland over the year for the Mountain Rescue Committee of Scotland over the years. I was the Chairman of the Mountain Rescue Committee in the early nineties when we were first approached by the Order of St John who wanted to assist Mountain Rescue in Scotland.

I was at that time in the RAF and serving at RAF Kinloss in Morayshire. I was the Team…

View original post 835 more words

UK Weather: How stormy has it been and why?

Official blog of the Met Office news team

Since the start of December the UK has seen a prolonged period of particularly unsettled weather, with a series of storms tracking in off the Atlantic bringing strong winds and heavy rain.

The windiest month since 1993

In order to compare the recent spell with the numerous stormy periods of weather in the past the Met Office’s National Climate Information Centre has done an analysis of the number of weather stations in the UK which have registered winds over certain thresholds since the start of December.

This measure suggests that December 2013 is the stormiest December in records dating back to 1969 and is one of the windiest calendar months for the UK since January 1993.

December was also a very wet month across the UK, particularly in Scotland where it was the wettest December and wettest month overall in the records dating back to 1910.

But why has this…

View original post 447 more words

UK: New reports show harm to disabled and sick from ‘fit for work’ tests – 091213 1345z

“Two new reports draw attention to the damaging impact of fit for work assessments on many sick and disabled people, giving more evidence of the misery and hardship they experience, and providing further clues as to the underlying cause of the flawed process.

The People’s review of the WCA: further evidence, produced by the Spartacus network of disabled researchers and campaigners, is published today, 9 December 2013. It is also being made available through the think-tank Ekklesia and other supportive NGOs.

How Norms Become Targets: Investigating the real reason for the misery of fit for work assessments, by leading independent disability campaigner Kaliya Franklin, also part of the Spartacus network, was published on 2 December by the Centre for Welfare Reform.

Despite minor improvements in the Work Capability Assessment (WCA), politicians, doctors, other medical professionals, church leaders, journalists, disabled people and thousands of others continue to express serious disquiet over its impact on sick and disabled people, critics say.

The assessment is used to determine eligibility for Employment and Support Allowance (ESA), which provides support for people who are unable to work for health reasons, but there remains little confidence in its operation.

The People’s review of the WCA: further evidence has been written by an anonymous author determined, despite seriously failing health, to do everything she possibly can to raise awareness of the impact of the WCA on the lives of sick and disabled people.

Like the first Peoples Review, published a year ago, this new report aims to give a voice to those whose lives have been devastated by the impact of the assessment on their physical and mental health and financial security.

It shows how the WCA very often fails in its purpose to identify those who need secure financial support because they are unable to work due to an impairment or serious health condition.

The Centre for Welfare Reform paper includes whistle-blower evidence and analysis showing that despite consistent denials by ministers outcomes for sick and disabled ESA claimants are governed, to some extent at least, by a system of norms.

In practice these norms behave as quotas, ensuring that no more than a certain percentage of claimants are eligible for ESA. This cynical approach to assessing claimants for sickness benefits has its roots in Lord Freuds report ‘Reducing Dependency, Increasing Opportunity: options for the future of welfare to work’, published in 2007, and provides a distressing explanation for the experiences described in the second Peoples Review, says the Spartacus network.

In a news release, the group says: “It seems clear that without de facto quotas, explained in Kaliya Franklins report, it is much less likely that the process of being assessed for support would inflict so much suffering on so many people. Taken together, the reports add more detail to an emerging picture of the political manipulation at the heart of an assessment process that continues to cause sick and disabled people immense hardship and suffering a full five years after its introduction.”

Simon Barrow, co-director of the beliefs and values think-tank Ekklesia, says that the two reports illustrate the need for government to shift its approach and attitudes to welfare radically.

He commented: “The accumulating research evidence of the hugely damaging impact of ‘fit for work’ assessment processes on a significant number of disabled and sick people is not something a civilised government or society can ignore.

“We agree with the British Medical Association and other expert bodies and analysts that the Work Capability Assessment is not fit for purpose. Further serious questions are also being raised about intentions and actions of the Department of Work and Pensions.

“The publication of new evidence about the impact of WCA from the Spartacus network of disabled researchers and campaigners illustrates the crucial need for policy in this area to be formulated with the substantial involvement of those most directly affected.

“The case for an independent, cumulative impact assessment of welfare reform in the UK, together with a new deal for disabled and sick people based on their needs and aspirations, is now overwhelming.

“Ekklesia is delighted that this proposal will now be discussed in parliament, following huge public support for the WOW petition, and urges that this should take place in the parliamentary chamber itself, not in a Westminster annex.”

* People’s review of the WCA: further evidence – http://www.ekklesia.co.uk/node/19621

* Spartacus network – http://wearespartacus.org.uk

* ATOS and DWP stand accused over flawed ‘fit for work’ assessments – http://www.ekklesia.co.uk/node/19623

* Centre for Welfare Reform – http://www.centreforwelfarereform.org

* Urgent action: letter to MPs asking parliament to listen to disabled and sick people – http://www.ekklesia.co.uk/node/19587

[Ekk/3]” – ekklesia staff writers 9 Dec 2013

UK: Have you seen 78 year old Joan Russell still missing from Exeter, Devon – 191113 1640z

Police in Exeter are continuing to search for a 78-year-old woman who has not been seen since 9.30pm on Friday 15 November.


Joan Russell was last seen at her home address in the Emmanuel Close area of Exeter. Because of her age and her condition she is considered vulnerable and police are concerned for her welfare.

Joan has limited mobility and walks with the aid of a walking stick. The stick was left behind as well as her money, medication, bus pass and other personal belongings.

She is believed to be wearing a grey skirt and a green light weight jacket. She is about 5ft 4ins and has grey wavy hair to her ears.

It is believed she may be in the St Thomas or Exwick area of the city.

If anyone believes they have seen her or has any information that could assist, please call police on 101 quoting log 261 of 16/11/13.

Europe: ESTOFEX Storm Forecast: Level 2 for NW France, S Germany, Czechia, N Switzerland and N Austria mainly for severe convective wind gusts and tornadoes. Valid until 281013 06:00 UTC – 271013 1000z

Storm Forecast

 

 

Storm Forecast
Valid: Sun 27 Oct 2013 06:00 to Mon 28 Oct 2013 06:00 UTC
Issued: Sun 27 Oct 2013 05:14
Forecaster: VAN DER VELDE

A level 2 was issued for northeastern France, southern Germany, Czechia, northern Switzerland and northern Austria mainly for severe convective wind gusts and tornadoes.

A level 1 was issued for parts of France, Belgium, Netherlands, Germany, Czech Republic, Poland, as well as Ireland, mainly for severe convective wind gusts and tornadoes.

A level 1 was issued for western France and southern UK for severe convective gust and tornado chances after midnight.

SYNOPSIS

A large depression centered west of Scotland has transported a broad plume of relatively warm low level air deep into Europe. A sharp shortwave trough dramatically visible in IPV fields is racing from western France to eastern Poland during the period. Together with a northwesterly jet axis left exit region, it forces rising air with steepening lapse rates between central France and the Netherlands in the morning, which shifts into Germany during the afternoon and Czechia/Poland in the evening. Thedynamic tropopause(PV)/jet axis intersection region moves just north of the Alps. There is a strong wind field with a corridor over southern Germany with >30 m/s winds in the lowest kilometers.
Late in the night, a side disturbance of the main low arrives in the English Channel region with signs of rapid cyclogenesis en-route to Denmark, producing gale conditions on Monday.

DISCUSSION

…Ireland…

In the first 6 hours of the period, convection and conditions of strong low-level winds and shear 15-20 m/s are present. The jetstream passes over the southern half of Ireland. Expect some convective gusts greater than 25 m/s. An isolated tornado cannot be ruled out as well.

…western France, southern UK…

This region will be affected by two disturbances in 24 hours. At 06Z, unstable air under the influence of the shortwave trough is present as well as 25 m/s mean winds in the low levels, and some 20 m/s 0-1 km shear. Mesoscale convective development is not yet expected to begin, but these conditions combined with low LCL heights can lead to tornadoes, aside from severe wind gusts.
After 00/03Z, the cold front of the second low comes in. It seems to become somewhat convectively active, likely as a forced convective line (there is little CAPE and EL at only -15), this time with 30-40 m/s mean winds in the low levels over NW France capable of producing damaging gusts at the ground. The front bends back over the southern UK with less strong wind field but enhanced shear and instability sufficient for a tornado or two. The 00Z GFS run predicts the low to take a much more northerly and faster course with more stable conditions than the 18Z run.

…northeastern France to southwestern Poland…

Synoptic and mesoscale lifting appears to increase in tyhe GFS model over northern France and enhance CAPE to about 200 J/kg. A linear PV intrusion is likely to shape the convection as a line, although WRF models suggest more cellular/short line segment modes instead. Indeed even in the GFS model there is a large region of deep convergence but no sharp line at the surface. The jet exit region affects most directly the zone immediately north of the Alps. In entire southern Germany more than 20 m/s of 0-1 km shear should exist, which aids tornadogenesis (with >250 m²/s² of 0-3 km SREH also predicted) and bow echoes with strong to very strong gusts during convective storms. The 00Z GFS run predicts the same timing as the 18Z run but with the PV intrusion displaced slightly to the north, as well as more positive rather than negative tilt.