UK: Most hillgoers unprepared for emergencies, Ordnance Survey study reveals – Published 30 Jun 2017 1400z (GMT/UTC)

 Most hillgoers unprepared for emergencies, Ordnance Survey study reveals

“A study by Britain’s national mapping agency has revealed many hillgoers are clueless about what to do if things went wrong.

Ordnance Survey said one in eight of people asked would not know how to deal with a mountain emergency if they had no phone signal.

And three-quarters of recreational walkers don’t plan their route properly or pack the right gear, the survey found.

The figures were released as OS announced it was teaming up with Mountain Rescue England and Wales, the umbrella body for voluntary teams south of the border, to try to reduce outdoor incidents.

There were only 14 days last year where a mountain rescue team in England and Wales wasn’t called out.

In 2016 MREW attended 1,812 callouts, up 170 on the previous year, of which 360 were serious or fatal. Mountain bike incidents also continued to rise in 2016, though not at the same rate as previous years.

OS’s survey of more than 2,000 adults from across Great Britain who enjoy recreational walking and hiking highlighted the need for a more safety-minded approach when venturing outdoors.

A total of 83 per cent of those questioned admitted that if they were in trouble on a mountain and had no phone signal they wouldn’t know what to do. It also revealed how more and more walkers and hikers, especially those from younger generations, are not carrying paper maps, compasses or whistles, and are relying entirely on the functionality of their mobile phones, even though only 28 per cent of all respondents would think to check in advance the availability of a mobile phone signal in the place to where they are heading…..” – Bob Smith, Editor of grough magazine
Thursday 29 June 2017 06:39 PM GMT Click for full story

Calling the emergency services from a mobile phone (Advice from Dartmoor Rescue)

The short video gives important information about dialing the emergency services from a mobile phone in the event of an accident. It answers important questions such as:

  • what�s the difference between 999 and 112?
  • How can you call when your mobile phone is showing no signal?
  • Or if somebody in your party is unconscious and their�s is the only mobile, �how can you bypass the phone security to make that important call and potentially save their life?

All this and more is explained simply and clearly.

So be prepared and watch the video as it could save the life or a family member of friend.

�Help Me� The Secrets of using 112 on a mobile phone in an emergency/accident

You need to register your mobile phone before being able to alert the emergency services, including mountain and cave rescue, via SMS text message. �This is best done�before�you need help. You can register by sending an SMS text message from your mobile phone as follows:

(Goaty: Suggest better to register with 112 rather than 999 � why? see video, but why not both)

sms999.001 - Version 2

More information can be found at the following website:�http://www.emergencysms.org.uk/

“Help Me” The Secrets of using a PLB (Personal Locator Beacon) in an emergency/accident

https://lh3.ggpht.com/_D_E5598eI3o/TSm5QDx_3vI/AAAAAAAACCk/aym4dYflxxg/s1600/mountainrescue.jpgGeneral Mountain/Moorland Advice from Mountain Rescue England & Wales:

Mountains and moorlands can be treacherous places without proper care and there are many, many ways to enjoy the mountain environment, be it walking, climbing, running, cycling or skiing. There�s no subsititute for experience, but there are steps you can take to minimise the chances of getting lost or hurt.

Prepare and plan

  • Develop the mountain skills you need to judge potential hazard, including the ability to read a map.
  • Think about the equipment, experience, capabilities and enthusiasm of your party members, taking into account the time of year, the terrain and the nature of the trip � and choose your routes accordingly.
  • Learn the basic principles of first aid � airway, breathing, circulation and the recovery position. It could make the difference between life and death.

Wear suitable clothing and footwear

  • Wear suitable footwear with a treaded sole, and which provides support for ankles.
  • Clothing should be colourful, warm, windproof and waterproof and always carry spare, including hat and gloves (even in summer the tops and open moorland can still be bitingly cold, and it�s always colder the higher you climb).

Carry food and drink�

  • Take ample food and drink for each member of the party. High energy food such as chocolate and dried fruit are ideal for a quick hit.
  • In cold, wet weather a warm drink is advisable, and always carry water � even in cool weather it�s easy to become dehydrated.
  • Of course, large quantities of water can weight heavy in the rucksack, so take a smaller water bottle and top up when you can � streams on hills are drinkable if fast-running over stony beds.

�and the right equipment

  • A map and compass are essential kit and should be easily accessible � not buried in the rucksack!
  • A mobile phone and GPS are useful tools but don�t rely on your mobile to get you out of trouble � in may areas of the mountains there is no signal coverage.
  • Take a whistle and learn the signal for rescue. Six good long blasts. Stop for one minute. Repeat. Carry on the whistle blasts until someone reaches you and don�t stop because you�ve heard a reply � rescuers may be using your blasts as a direction finder.
  • A torch (plus spare batteries and bulbs) is a must. Use it for signalling in the same pattern as for whistle blasts.
  • At least one reliable watch in the party.
  • Cllimbers and mountain bikers should wear a helmet. In winter conditions, an ice-axe, crampons and survival bag are essential.
  • Emergency survival kit comprising spare clothing and a bivvi bag.
  • New OrdnanceSurvey free smartphone app OSLocate will help walkers in a fix http://www.grough.co.uk/magazine/2014/03/24/ordnance-survey-free-smartphone-app-will-help-walkers-in-a-fix

Before you set out

  • Charge your phone battery! Many accidents occur towards the end of the day when both you and your phone may be low on energy.
  • Check the weather forecast and local conditions. Mountains can be major undertakings and, in the winter months, night falls early.
  • Eat well before you start out.
  • Leave your route plan including start and finish points, estimated time of return and contact details with an appropriate party.

On the hill

  • Keep an eye on the weather and be prepared to turn back if conditions turn against you, even if this upsets a long planned adventure.
  • Make sure party leaders are experienced. Keep together, allow the slowest member of the party to determine the pace, and take special care of the youngest and weakest in dangerous places.
  • Watch for signs of hypothermia, particularly in bad weather � disorientation, shivering, tiredness, pale complexion and loss of circulation in hands or toes, discarding of vital clothing. Children and older people are especially susceptible.
  • If you prefer to go alone, be aware of the additional risk. Let people know your route before you start, stick to it as far as you can and notify them of any changes.
  • If you think you need mountain rescue, get a message to the Police (112/999) as soon as possible and keep injured/exhausted people safe and warm until help reaches you.

Dangers you can avoid

  • Precipices and unstable boulder.
  • Slopes of ice or steep snow, and snow cornices on ridges or gully tops.
  • Very steep grass slopes, especially if frozen or wet.
  • Gullies, gorges and stream beds, and streams in spate.
  • Exceeding your experience and abilities and loss of concentration.

Dangers you need to monitor

  • Weather changes � mist gale, rain and snow may be sudden and more extreme than forecast.
  • Ice on path (know how to use an ice-axe and crampons).
  • Excessive cold or heat (dress appropriately and carry spare clothing!).
  • Exhaustion (know the signs, rest and keep warm).
  • Passage of time � especially true when under pressure � allow extra time in winter or night time conditions.

Check out the Safe in the Hills website � pioneered by the Kirkby Stephen MRT, for more information about how you can keep safe whilst walking in the hills.

How to take care of your feet when hiking�. The key recommendations are:

  • Choose the right hiking boots
  • Trim your toenails
  • Soften any tough skin (which are subject to hard to treat deep blisters)
  • Rest feet when walking

�Avoiding and treating foot blisters for hikers�, as well as giving some useful advice on how to treat blisters, highlights the importance of changing your (decent walking) socks when they get wet

  1. Make sure you have a decent pair of boots
  2. Take plenty of decent hiking socks
  3. Change your socks when they get damp (if you do this as early as possible you have a fighting chance to dry them in your sleeping bag)
  4. Regularly let your feet rest and breath
  5. Regularly apply talc to your feet
  6. If it is raining or very damp, wear gaiters to stop water getting into your boots

Do this and your feet, the most important hiking equipment you have, will thank you!

(Stolen from http://philsorrell.com/2010/03/01/importance-of-foot-care-whilst-hiking/)

Do not use any information on this site for life or death decisions. All information is intended as supplementary to official sources. Kindly refer to your country’s official weather agency/government website for local warnings, advisories and bulletins.

UK: RAF Search & Rescue Role Ends After 74 Years – Published 04 Oct 2015 1925z (GMT/UTC)

RAF Search & Rescue Role Ends After 74 Years

PROUD RECORD: 34,025 Call-outs completed and 26,853 lives saved

The RAF's final operational search and rescue sortie comes to an end at RMB Chivenor at 12.07 on 4 October 2015. (Image: RAF)

The RAF’s final operational search and rescue sortie comes to an end at RMB Chivenor at 12.07 on 4 October 2015. (Image: RAF)

More than 74 years of continuous life-saving operations by the Royal Air Force in the UK came to an end at 1.00pm today, when the Chivenor duty search and rescue crew was formally relieved from its standby commitment by the United Kingdom Aeronautical Rescue Coordination Centre. The finale for RAF Search and Rescue in the UK was ‘business as usual’ with a final search and rescue operation taking place in the early hours of this morning.

The crew of the RAF's final operational UK search and rescue sortie: (left to right) Wing Commander 'Sparky' Dunlop (captain and Officer Commanding 22 Squadron), Sergeant Dan Allanson, Sergeant Russ Jenkins and Flight Lieutenant 'PJ' Howard. (Image: RAF)

The crew of the RAF’s final operational UK search and rescue sortie: (left to right) Wing Commander ‘Sparky’ Dunlop (captain and Officer Commanding 22 Squadron), Sergeant Dan Allanson, Sergeant Russ Jenkins and Flight Lieutenant ‘PJ’ Howard. (Image: RAF)

Chivenor is the last of the RAF’s 6 search and rescue bases to hand over responsibility for helicopter search and rescue provision to Bristow Helicopters Ltd.

Official search and rescue statistics show that since 1983 the RAF’s 6 units completed 34,025 callouts and rescued 26,853 persons in distress.

The final RAF crew to hold operational search and rescue standby commitment in the UK: (left to right) Sergeant Doug Bowden, Flight Lieutenant Ayla Holdom, Flight Lieutenant Christian 'Taff' Wilkins and Flight Sergeant Chris Scurr.(Image: RAF)

The final RAF crew to hold operational search and rescue standby commitment in the UK: (left to right) Sergeant Doug Bowden, Flight Lieutenant Ayla Holdom, Flight Lieutenant Christian ‘Taff’ Wilkins and Flight Sergeant Chris Scurr.(Image: RAF)

Other Reports

BBC

Chivenor hands over air rescue services to private firm

AgustaWestland AW189 in Coastguard livery operated by Bristow

AgustaWestland AW189 in Coastguard livery operated by Bristow

An RAF air rescue team based at Chivenor in north Devon has handed over its role to a private firm.

Bristow took over from the military at RMB Chivenor at 13:00 BST and will fly out of St Athan in south Wales.

The handover was delayed by four days because Bristow said it needed extra time.

Aberdeen-based Bristow won a 10-year contract to take over the service, which is being privatised around the UK.

The £1.6bn search and rescue deal with Bristow ends 70 years of search and rescue from the RAF and Royal Navy.

END

Well done RAF! – Goaty 🙂

Related:

UK Search & Rescue helicopters to be cut by nearly 50% – 300313 1650z

UK Government plan to close 50% of UK Coastguard Maritime Rescue Co-ordination Centres – Updated 07 Feb 2013 0001Z: https://goatysnews.wordpress.com/2012/12/19/uk-government-plan-to-close-50-of-uk-coastguard-maritime-rescue-co-ordination-centres-published-23-aug-2012-2310z/

Privatising Search and Rescue: https://goatysnews.wordpress.com/2013/02/07/5765/

Could this be the coalition government’s biggest cock-up yet?: https://goatysnews.wordpress.com/2012/09/29/3435/

Support flaring for Clyde Coastguard, Scotland – Published 03 Sept 2012 1440Z: https://goatysnews.wordpress.com/2012/09/03/support-flaring-for-clyde-coastguard-scotland-published-03-sept-2012-1440z/

France: The work of the PGHM Mont Blanc French Mountain Rescue (Videos in French) Le travail du sauvetage en montagne PGHM Mont Blanc français (VidĂ©os en français) – 220114 1643

Found on Goaty’s News incoming Facebook feed today….

Alpine Exposures- Jon Griffith Photography:

“An incredibly interesting insight in to the workings of the PGHM with fantastic footage from real rescues. It gives you a real appreciation for the work that this team does. Part 2 is a bit more of a shock as it deals with the Mont Maudit Avalanche and features alot of footage of dead climbers.

Part 1 takes you through the winter months (no deaths) and how the team works etc. Part 2 gives a far deeper and emotional feel to the work that they do and the morbid and often very dangerous situations they find themselves in. Part 2 might be a bit tough for some but I really recommend watching Part 1.

Thanks as always to the PGHM…legends of the valley.”

The videos are in French.

Trouvé sur Nouvelles de Goaty entrant Facebook alimentation aujourd’hui ….
Alpine expositionsJon Griffith Photographie:

Un aperçu incroyablement intéressant pour le fonctionnement de l’PGHM avec des images fantastiques de véritables sauvetages. Cela vous donne une véritable reconnaissance pour le travail que cette équipe fait. Partie 2 est un peu plus d’un choc, car il traite avec le Mont Maudit Avalanche et offre beaucoup de vidéos de grimpeurs morts.

Partie 1 vous emmène à travers les mois d’hiver (aucun décès) et la façon dont l’équipe travaille etc Partie 2 donne une sensation beaucoup plus profond et émotionnel pour le travail qu’ils font et les situations morbides et souvent très dangereuses ils se trouvent po Partie 2 puissance être un peu difficile pour certains, mais je recommande vraiment regarder la partie 1.

Merci comme toujours au PGHM légendes de la vallée.

Les vidéos sont en français.

PGHM:Mont Blanc,French mountain rescue,part 1

(Video credit: forgumpone)

PGHM:Mont Blanc,French mountain rescue,part 2

(Video credit: forgumpone)

The official facebook page of the Peloton de Gendarmerie de Haute Montagne de Chamonix Mont-blanc here: https://www.facebook.com/pghm.chamonixmontblanc

La page facebook officielle du Peloton de Gendarmerie de Haute Montagne de Chamonix Mont-blanc ici: https://www.facebook.com/pghm.chamonixmontblanc

The Order of St John and Mountain Rescue?

heavywhalleyr

I bet few who use the Outdoors know about the wonderful work of the Order Of St John and its incredible assistance to Mountain Rescue in Scotland? Hope fully after reading this you may have an idea of what work they have done.

Order of st John Logo

This is the copy of a letter I wrote to the Order when I retired from Mountain Rescue. Firstly please accept my sincere apologies for not writing before to thank you for all your great work for the Mountain Rescue Committee of Scotland over the year for the Mountain Rescue Committee of Scotland over the years. I was the Chairman of the Mountain Rescue Committee in the early nineties when we were first approached by the Order of St John who wanted to assist Mountain Rescue in Scotland.

I was at that time in the RAF and serving at RAF Kinloss in Morayshire. I was the Team…

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Climber dies on Mount Cook

Sykose Extreme Sports News

Aoraki Mount Cook. File photo / Doug Sherring

Aoraki Mount Cook. File photo / Doug Sherring

An experienced overseas climber was not tethered to his partner when he plummeted 600m to his death on Aoraki Mt Cook this morning.

The pair had been skiing and traversing near the lower summit, at an elevation of about 3700m, when the man fell down the mountain’s main ridge.

Police said it was believed he may have fallen vertically some 600m.

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