UK: Storm Aileen to bring very strong winds across much of England and Wales during Tuesday night and into Wednesday morning – Published 12 Sep 2017 1425z (GMT/UTC)

windy 1825 BST

Image above: Windy.com – Near real-time interative wind map (Link)

Storm Aileen is the first storm to be named since this seasons names were released last week and it will bring strong winds to central parts of the UK.

A deepening area of low pressure will bring very strong winds across much of England and Wales during Tuesday night and into Wednesday morning. An Amber National Severe Weather Warning is in place, warning of gusts of 55-65 mph in particular across parts of Cheshire, Lancashire, Derbyshire, Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire and Lincolnshire.  Gusts up to around 75mph gusts could also be possible in exposed locations such as the coast and hills in these areas.

A Yellow weather warning for rain is also in place for parts of Northern Ireland, Northern England and Southern Scotland which warns of 30-40mm of rain falling within 6-9 hours which could cause some disruption.

Chief forecaster Frank Saunders said: “Storm Aileen is expected to bring strong winds of up to 75mph to a central segment of the UK and an Amber weather warning has been issued. As well as the strong winds, there will be some heavy rain pushing eastwards overnight which could see accumulations of 30-40mm. The low pressure system that is bringing these strong winds will move fairly swiftly from west to east over the UK and although there will still be some disruption through Wednesday morning, the winds will ease by the afternoon leaving a day of blustery showers.”

Richard Leonard, road safety spokesperson at Highways England, said: “We’re encouraging drivers to check the latest weather and travel conditions before setting off on journeys, with strong winds expected from Tuesday evening until Wednesday morning. In high winds, there’s a particular risk to lorries, caravans and motorbikes so we’d advise drivers of these vehicles to slow down and avoid using exposed sections of road if possible.”

There has been some speculation that this weather is being driven by the severe weather in the Caribbean and US. There is no such connection. Met Office Deputy Meteorologist Chris Tubbs said: “There are no links between the very strong winds we expect to see here in the UK and the hurricanes affecting the United States and the Caribbean at present. This system originated well north in the Atlantic Ocean, independent of the current Caribbean hurricanes”.

As Storm Aileen clears out eastwards into the North Sea, the UK will be left with cool showery conditions through the end of the week and into the weekend. The showers will still be blustery on Thursday with the winds easing as we get closer to the weekend. Within the showers there will be some periods of brightness although it will still feel cool across the whole of the UK with top temperatures only reaching 18-19°C

You can find out the current forecast in your area using their forecast pages and by following the Met Office on Twitter and Facebook, as well as using their mobile app which is available for iPhone from the App store and for Android from the Google Play store. Source: UK Met Office

AMBER WARNING of WIND for north Wales. northern parts of The Midlands, southern parts of northern England and the northern fringes of East Anglia.

Between 00:05 Wed 13th and 06:00 Wed 13th

Storm Aileen will bring a brief spell of very strong westerly winds with gusts of 65-75 mph during the early hours of Wednesday. Longer journey times by road, rail and air are looking likely, with restrictions on roads and bridges. Damage to trees and perhaps buildings, as well as power cuts are expected. Flying debris and large coastal waves are possible, and these could lead to injuries.

YELLOW WARNING of WIND for Wales, The Midlands, southern parts of northern England, southwest England and southeast England.

Between 20:00 Tue 12th and 10:00 Wed 13th

Storm Aileen is expected to bring very strong winds with gusts of 50-60 mph on Tuesday night and into Wednesday morning. The worst of the winds, with gusts to 65-75 mph, are expected to be across North Wales, southern parts of Northern England, the North Midlands and Norfolk, for which area a separate Amber warning is being issued. Longer journey times by road, rail and air are likely, with restrictions on roads and bridges. There is also a chance of power cuts, and damage to trees and perhaps buildings. Along windward-facing coasts, some wave overtopping is possible.

YELLOW WARNING of RAIN for southern parts of Northern Ireland, southern Scotland and northern England.

Between 17:00 Tue 12th and 08:00 Wed 13th

Heavy rain is expected later on Tuesday and early on Wednesday. This may cause flooding on the transport network, with spray and difficult driving conditions due to the combination of rain and wind. There is also a small chance of flooding affecting homes and businesses. Note also the possibility of strong winds in the south of the area – please see separate warnings.

=============================================================================

Do not use any information on this site for life or death decisions. All information is intended as supplementary to official sources. Kindly refer to your country’s official weather agency/government website for local warnings, advisories and bulletins.

Advertisements

UK SEVERE WEATHER and FLOOD WARNINGS – Updated 16 Nov 2015 2330z (GMT/UTC)

==UK==

STORM BARNEY

SKYWARN

Severe Weather Alert #54 issued (See below)

Met Office Severe Weather Warnings:

Met Office Weather Warnings for mobile

Highlands & Eilean Siar Yellow Warning

Strathclyde Yellow Warning

London & South East England Yellow Warning

East Midlands Yellow Warning

North West England Yellow Warning

South West England Yellow Warning

Yorkshire & Humber Yellow Warning

Orkney & Shetland Yellow Warning

East of England Yellow Warning

Wales Yellow Warning

West Midlands Yellow Warning

North East England Yellow Warning

(For details follow above links)

 20 Flood Warnings in England and Wales – 6 in Scotland

at

22:52 on 16 Nov 2015 GMT

29 Flood Alerts in England and Wales – 5 in Scotland

at 

22:52 on 16 Nov 2015 GMT

( Check for interim updates in comments at bottom of page)

Severe Weather Warnings for Europe are now toward the bottom of the page

UK Visible Satellite (meteocentre.com)

UK Infra Red Satellite (meteocentre.com)

Weather Radar Europe (meteox.co.uk)

Channel Islands (Jersey) Weather Radar Latest Animation

Jersey Radar also covers much of South/South West of England & N France

CI weather warnings


SkyWarn UK’s mission is to forecast, report, and record severe weather.

SKYWARN UK CURRENT ALERT (Link)

Severe Weather Alert #54
SWUK has issued a Severe Weather Alert for strong winds in excess of 70mph
Valid from 1300hrs Tuesday 17th November to 0300hrs Wednesday 18th November.
for
South and South Western England & Wales
An easterly moving low pressure system (officially named ‘Barney’ by the MetO) will track across southern UK on Tuesday afternoon and evening.
Wind gusts could exceed SWUK criteria of 70mph along exposed coasts on the southern flank of the low.
Wales and the Bristol Channel could see gusts of 80mph
Spotters in the alert area are requested to report any breaches of SWUK criteria in the normal manner.

For details on SkyWarn UK’s alert criteria, click HERE.

TORRO Logo The Tornado & Storm Research Organisation (TORRO)

The latest Severe Weather Reports from TORRO can be found by following this link:

SEVERE WEATHER FORECAST

Report Severe Weather

Torro on Facebook

Latest news reports (see bottom of page)

BBC Weather

Monday

151116

Tuesday

151117

Wednesday

151118

UK Warnings

Warnings

Monday 16 November Published at 16:54

UK Warnings

Weather Warning

Issued by the Met Office

YELLOW WARNING OF WIND for NORTHWEST SCOTLAND

Issued at 10:35 on Mon 16 Nov

Valid from 11:00 on Mon 16 Nov

Valid until 23:55 on Mon 16 Nov

Southwesterly winds will increase during Monday, when severe gales will affect parts of the northwest mainland of Scotland, the Western Isles and Northern Isles. The strongest winds will initially develop across the Western Isles and northwest coast this afternoon before extending into the Northern Isles during the evening. Winds will quickly ease on Tuesday.

Gusts of wind of 65-75 mph are expected in places, so be aware that there may be some further disruption to travel. Additionally, large waves may cause some overtopping of sea defences.

This an update to the warning issued on Sunday morning.

Further updates will appear here.

YELLOW WARNING OF RAIN for NORTH WALES and NORTH ENGLAND

Issued at 10:23 on Mon 16 Nov

Valid from 10:00 on Tue 17 Nov

Valid until 23:45 on Tue 17 Nov

Further rain is expected on Tuesday as a frontal system runs across the UK from the west. The largest accumulations are expected across the hills of northwest England and northwest Wales though low lying areas will also see a period of heavy rain. On the southern side of this system some very strong winds are expected and a separate warning for winds is likely to be issued.

The public should be aware that, given the already saturated conditions, flooding is possible either from standing water or from rivers already swollen by recent rainfall. This could lead to disruption to travel and perhaps localised flooding to properties.

This is a further update to the warning originally issued on Friday, reducing the northern extent of the warning and moving into minor impacts.

Further updates will appear here.

YELLOW WARNING of WIND for much of WALES and SOUTHERN ENGLAND

Issued at 10:46 on Mon 16 Nov

Valid from 15:00 on Tue 17 Nov

Valid until 23:30 on Tue 17 Nov

West to southwesterly gales and locally severe gales are likely to sweep eastwards across parts of Wales, southern, central and eastern England later on Tuesday. Gusts could reach 60-70 mph inland and possibly 80 mph along exposed coasts, particularly Wales and through the Bristol Channel.

Be aware of the risk of disruption to travel and that gusts of this strength could bring down trees and lead to some damage to weakened structures.

Further updates will appear here.

YELLOW EARLY WARNING OF RAIN for NORTH WALES and NORTH ENGLAND

Issued at 12:17 on Sun 15 Nov

Valid from 16:00 on Wed 18 Nov

Valid until 23:45 on Wed 18 Nov

Another spell of heavy rain, accompanied by gale force winds in places, will cross the country on Wednesday, with largest rainfall over the high ground areas already saturated from recent wet weather. Up to 50 mm is expected in the wettest spots in North Wales and NW England.

The public should be aware of the potential for further impacts such as disruption to travel and local flooding.

Further updates will appear here.

When a warning is in force, full information can be found at Met Office Weather Warnings

Northern Ireland: Addition information available from https://www.facebook.com/northernirelandweather?fref=ts

Early Warnings will be issued more than 24 hours ahead of severe weather.

What is a Sudden Stratospheric Warming (SSW)?

Peter Gibbs explains sudden stratospheric warming and why it is often linked to outbreaks of cold weather: Sudden stratospheric warming

What is freezing fog?

UK RADAR AND SATELLITE

Surface Analyses & Observations UK and Europe

https://embed.windyty.com/?surface,wind,now,53.801,3.076,4,,menu,,

Animated map of global wind conditions

BE READY FOR BAD WEATHER and other emergencies – Advice and resources

News at bottom of page

FLOOD WARNINGS & ALERTS

There are NO SEVERE FLOOD WARNING currently in force in England & Wales at

22:52 on 16 Nov 2015 GMT

There are NO SEVERE FLOOD WARNINGS currently in force in Scotland at

22:52 on 16 Nov 2015 GMT

Flood Warning Flood Warning Flooding is expected. Immediate action required

There are 20 FLOOD WARNINGS currently in force in England & Wales at

22:52 on 16 Nov 2015 GMT

http://apps.environment-agency.gov.uk/flood/31618.aspx

There are 6 FLOOD WARNINGS currently in force in Scotland at

22:52 on 16 Nov 2015 GMT

Flood Alert Flood AlertFlooding is possible. Be prepared.

There are 29 FLOOD ALERTS currently in force in England & Wales at

22:52 on 16 Nov 2015 GMT

There are 5 FLOOD ALERTS currently in force in Scotland at

22:52 on 16 Nov 2015 GMT

About the Environment Agency Flood Warnings

The flood warnings are issued by the Environment Agency and the Scottish Environment Protection Agency and sent to the BBC Weather Centre, we then issue a compendium of warnings based on the latest information available. When severe flood warnings are issued they will also be highlighted on TV broadcasts.

Find out more about Flood Warnings

There are a number of ways you find out whether your area is at risk from flooding. Both the Environment Agency (for England and Wales) and the Scottish Environment Protection Agency update their warnings 24 hours a day via the Floodline number.

Floodline 0845 988 1188

Coastal Forecast

A 24 hour weather forecast for 24 UK coastal areas

Tide Tables

Tidal information supplied by the UK Hydrographic Office

Inshore Waters

There are strong wind warnings in 19 areas.

There is a gale warning in 1 area.

The next few days will be dominated by severeal areas of low pressure tracking across the British Isles bringing strong winds, large waves and changeable weather to all parts.

Shipping Forecast

There are gale warnings in 29 areas.

The general synopsis at midday

Low Bailey 964 expected Norwegian Basin 973 by midday tomorrow. New low expected Shannon 983 by same time.

Extended Outlook

The Extended Outlook aims to signpost expected hazards for the Cullercoats, Niton and Portpatrick areas for the three days beyond the 24 hour shipping forecast.

High Seas

There are storm warnings in 8 areas.

The general synopsis at 16 November 20:00 UTC

At 161200UTC low 60 north 13 west 964 expected 63 north 02 east 973 by 171200UTC. Low 48 north 39 west 987 expected 53 north 12 west 983 by same time. Low 50 north 20 west 998 losing its identity by that time. New low moving slowly east expected 53 north 32 west 988 by 171200UTC

UK SEVERE WEATHER and FLOOD WARNINGS – Updated 27 Dec 2014 1433z (GMT/UTC)

Updated here:

https://goatysnews.wordpress.com/2015/01/08/uk-severe-weather-and-flood-warnings-updated-08-jan-2015-1203z-gmtutc/

Do not use any information on this site for life or death decisions. All information is intended as supplementary to official sources. Kindly refer to your country’s official weather agency/government website for local warnings, advisories and bulletins.

UK SEVERE WEATHER and FLOOD WARNINGS – Updated 11 Dec 2014 1343z (GMT/UTC)

Updated here:  https://goatysnews.wordpress.com/2014/12/26/uk-severe-weather-and-flood-warnings-updated-26-dec-2014-0830z-gmtutc/

Do not use any information on this site for life or death decisions. All information is intended as supplementary to official sources. Kindly refer to your country’s official weather agency/government website for local warnings, advisories and bulletins.

UK SEVERE WEATHER and FLOOD WARNINGS – Updated 27 Oct 2014 1422z (GMT/UTC)

Updated here: https://goatysnews.wordpress.com/2014/11/21/uk-severe-weather-and-flood-warnings-updated-21-nov-2014-1217z-gmtutc/

Do not use any information on this site for life or death decisions. All information is intended as supplementary to official sources. Kindly refer to your country’s official weather agency/government website for local warnings, advisories and bulletins.

Bermuda/Canada/Atlantic: Hurricane GONZALO CAT1 181500Z 36.8N 61.7W, moving NNE at 22 knots (NHC) – Updated 181014 1643Z

Hurricane GONZALO

(CATEGORY 1 Hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale)

…GONZALO FORECAST TO PASS NEAR THE COAST OF NEWFOUNDLAND TONIGHT

A TROPICAL STORM WATCH IS EFFECT FOR…
ARNOLDS COVE TO CHAPELS COVE NEWFOUNDLAND…NHC

AFTER MAKING A DIRECT HIT ON BERMUDA LAST EVENING, HURRICANE
GONZALO IS ACCELERATING TO THE NORTHEAST AND EXPECTED TO TRACK
NEAR OR SOUTHEAST OF CAPE RACE, NEWFOUNDLAND EARLY SUNDAY
MORNING..
...CHC

(Image: wunderground.com) 5 day forecast (Click image for source)

(Image: wunderground.com) Satellite (Click image for source)

National Weather Service

National Hurricane Center

[Image of 5-day forecast and coastal areas under a warning or a watch]

000
WTNT33 KNHC 181455
TCPAT3

BULLETIN
HURRICANE GONZALO ADVISORY NUMBER 25
NWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL AL082014
1100 AM AST SAT OCT 18 2014

…GONZALO FORECAST TO PASS NEAR THE COAST OF NEWFOUNDLAND TONIGHT
AND EARLY SUNDAY…
SUMMARY OF 1100 AM AST…1500 UTC…INFORMATION
———————————————–
LOCATION…36.8N 61.7W
ABOUT 355 MI…575 KM NNE OF BERMUDA
ABOUT 815 MI…1310 KM SW OF CAPE RACE NEWFOUNDLAND
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS…90 MPH…150 KM/H
PRESENT MOVEMENT…NNE OR 30 DEGREES AT 25 MPH…41 KM/H
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE…966 MB…28.53 INCHES
WATCHES AND WARNINGS
——————–
CHANGES WITH THIS ADVISORY…

NONE.

SUMMARY OF WATCHES AND WARNINGS IN EFFECT…

A TROPICAL STORM WATCH IS EFFECT FOR…
* ARNOLDS COVE TO CHAPELS COVE NEWFOUNDLAND

A TROPICAL STORM WATCH MEANS THAT TROPICAL STORM CONDITIONS ARE
POSSIBLE WITHIN THE WATCH AREA…IN THIS CASE WITHIN 12 TO 24 HOURS.

FOR STORM INFORMATION SPECIFIC TO YOUR AREA…PLEASE MONITOR
PRODUCTS ISSUED BY YOUR NATIONAL METEOROLOGICAL SERVICE.
DISCUSSION AND 48-HOUR OUTLOOK
——————————
AT 1100 AM AST…1500 UTC…THE CENTER OF HURRICANE GONZALO WAS
LOCATED NEAR LATITUDE 36.8 NORTH…LONGITUDE 61.7 WEST. GONZALO IS
MOVING TOWARD THE NORTH-NORTHEAST NEAR 25 MPH…41 KM/H. THE
HURRICANE IS EXPECTED TO INCREASE ITS FORWARD SPEED OVER THE NEXT
DAY AND SHOULD PASS CLOSE OR JUST SOUTH OF CAPE RACE NEWFOUNDLAND
LATE TONIGHT OR SATURDAY MORNING.

MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS HAVE DROPPED TO NEAR 90 MPH…150
KM/H…WITH HIGHER GUSTS. SOME ADDITIONAL WEAKENING IS FORECAST
DURING THE NEXT 48 HOURS. GONZALO IS EXPECTED TO TRANSFORM INTO AN
EXTRATROPICAL CYCLONE IN ABOUT A DAY.

HURRICANE FORCE WINDS EXTEND OUTWARD UP TO 70 MILES…110 KM…FROM
THE CENTER…AND TROPICAL STORM FORCE WINDS EXTEND OUTWARD UP TO 205
MILES…335 KM.

THE ESTIMATED MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE IS 966 MB…28.53 INCHES.
HAZARDS AFFECTING LAND
———————-
WIND…TROPICAL STORM CONDITIONS ARE POSSIBLE IN THE TROPICAL STORM
WATCH AREA IN NEWFOUNDLAND BY LATE TONIGHT AND EARLY SUNDAY.

SURF…LARGE SWELLS GENERATED BY GONZALO ARE STILL AFFECTING
PORTIONS OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS…THE NORTHERN COASTS OF PUERTO RICO
AND THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC…PORTIONS OF THE BAHAMAS…PORTIONS OF
THE UNITED STATES EAST COAST…BERMUDA…AND ATLANTIC CANADA. THESE
SWELLS WILL LIKELY CAUSE LIFE-THREATENING SURF AND RIP CURRENT
CONDITIONS. FOR MORE INFORMATION…PLEASE CONSULT PRODUCTS FROM YOUR
LOCAL WEATHER OFFICE.
NEXT ADVISORY
————-
NEXT INTERMEDIATE ADVISORY…200 PM AST.
NEXT COMPLETE ADVISORY…500 PM AST.

$$
FORECASTER LANDSEA

 

==================================================

BWS – Tropical Update Bulletin
HURRICANE GONZALO
IS A POTENTIAL THREAT TO BERMUDA
Advisory #25, 12 pm Sat, Oct 18, 2014
KEY: Blue = 34-50 kts, Yellow = 50-64 kts, and Red = 64 kts and greater
Diagonal shading indicates fringe winds (34kts or greater surrounding the storm’s core)
Closest point of approach to Bermuda within 72 hrs (3 days) has passed.
Current Position: 36.8N 61.7W approx. 310 nm NNE of Bermuda
Recent Movement: NNE or 30 degrees at 22 kt
Central Pressure: 966 mb / 28.52 in
Max Winds: 80kt gusts 100kt
In line with NHC updates, Tropical Update Bulletins(TUB) are normally issued every 6 hours. Intermediate advisories may be issued every 3 hours when a tropical watch or warning is in effect (every 2 hours when radar has identified a storm centre). Additionally, TUBs may be issued at any time due to significant changes in warnings or in the cyclone.
Hurricane Track Information
WOCN31 CWHX 181145
TROPICAL CYCLONE INFORMATION STATEMENT UPDATED BY THE CANADIAN
HURRICANE CENTRE OF ENVIRONMENT CANADA AT 8:56 AM ADT SATURDAY
18 OCTOBER 2014.
———————————————————————
TROPICAL CYCLONE INFORMATION STATEMENT FOR:
NEWFOUNDLAND
NOVA SCOTIA.

FOR HURRICANE GONZALO.

THE NEXT STATEMENT WILL BE ISSUED BY 3:00 PM ADT.

AFTER MAKING A DIRECT HIT ON BERMUDA LAST EVENING, HURRICANE
GONZALO IS ACCELERATING TO THE NORTHEAST AND EXPECTED TO TRACK
NEAR OR SOUTHEAST OF CAPE RACE, NEWFOUNDLAND EARLY SUNDAY
MORNING.

———————————————————————
==DISCUSSION==
1. SUMMARY OF BASIC INFORMATION AT 9.00 AM ADT.

LOCATION: NEAR 35.8 NORTH 62.5 WEST.

ABOUT 430 KILOMETRES NORTH-NORTHEAST OF BERMUDA.

MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS: 157 KM/HOUR.

PRESENT MOVEMENT: NORTH-NORTHEAST AT 37 KM/HOUR.

MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE: 958 MB.

2. PUBLIC WEATHER IMPACTS AND WARNINGS SUMMARY.

THE LATEST INDICATIONS ARE THAT THE TRACK COULD RANGE FROM ST.
MARY’S BAY TO ABOUT 150 KILOMETRES SOUTHEAST OF CAPE RACE.
THIS REPRESENTS A RANGE OF ABOUT 200 KILOMETRES WITH ABOUT A
30 PERCENT CHANCE OF THE STORM CENTRE MAKING LANDFALL ON THE SOUTHERN
AVALON PENINSULA.

TROPICAL STORM WATCHES ARE IN EFFECT FOR THE AVALON PENINSULA, WITH
THE EXCEPTION OF AVALON PENINSULA NORTH, BEGINNING TONIGHT.THE
NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR WEATHER OFFICE HAS ISSUED RAINFALL WARNINGS
FOR THE AVALON PENINSULA.

A. WIND.

WINDS ASSOCIATED WITH GONZALO WILL BEGIN TO AFFECT THE AVALON
PENINSULA NEAR MIDNIGHT TONIGHT AND WILL INCREASE OVERNIGHT TO 50
GUSTING TO 80 KM/H.

B. RAINFALL.

MUCH OF SOUTHEASTERN NEWFOUNDLAND WILL RECEIVE RAINFALL AS A RESULT
OF GONZALO’S PASSAGE. THE BULK OF THE RAINFALL FROM GONZALO IS
CURRENTLY EXPECTED TO BE OVER THE AVALON PENINSULA.
CURRENT INDICATIONS ARE THAT RAIN ASSOCIATED WITH GONZALO WILL BEGIN
OVERNIGHT TONIGHT AND END BY MID MORNING SUNDAY. IN THE AREAS OF
HEAVIEST RAIN, RAINFALL RATES OF 25 MILLIMETRES PER HOUR FOR A BRIEF
PERIOD ARE POSSIBLE WHICH COULD RESULT IN A RISK OF FLASH FLOODING.

RAINFALL WARNINGS HAVE BEEN ISSUED FOR THE AVALON PENINSULA.

C. SURGE/WAVES.

WAVE HEIGHTS WILL INCREASE QUICKLY ALONG THE SOUTHERN COAST OF
NEWFOUNDLAND OVERNIGHT TONIGHT. THE LARGEST WAVES WILL BE ALONG THE
SOUTHERN COAST OF THE AVALON PENINSULA WHERE WAVE HEIGHTS WILL BE IN
THE 5 TO 8 METRE RANGE AND COULD POSSIBLY EXCEED 10 METRES.
ELSEWHERE ALONG THE SOUTH COAST OF NEWFOUNDLAND, WAVES OF 4 TO 6
METRES ARE LIKELY.

OF CONCERN IS THAT HIGH TIDE ALONG THE SOUTHERN AVALON PENINSULA IS
NEAR DAWN SUNDAY WHICH COULD BE THE APPROXIMATE TIME OF GONZALO’S
PASSAGE. HIGH COASTAL WATER LEVELS AND HIGH WAVES ARE LIKELY ALONG
SOUTHERN AVALON PENINSULA EARLY SUNDAY MORNING. THERE IS A
POSSIBILITY OF LOCAL FLOODING MAINLY DUE TO WAVE ACTIVITY AT THIS
TIME.

ALSO, THE ATLANTIC COAST OF NOVA SCOTIA WILL EXPERIENCE LARGE OCEAN
SWELLS OF 2 TO 3 METRES BEGINNING TONIGHT AND BUILDING TO 3 TO 5
METRES BY SUNDAY MORNING.

A SPECIAL WEATHER STATEMENT HAS BEEN ISSUED REGARDING THE WAVES AND
HIGH WATER LEVELS.

3. MARINE WEATHER IMPACTS AND WARNINGS SUMMARY.

THIS STORM WILL HAVE HEAVY IMPACTS OVER PARTS OF THE SOUTHERN MARINE
AREAS. HURRICANE FORCE WINDS AND SIGNIFICANT WAVE HEIGHTS IN EXCESS
OF 12 METRES ARE LIKELY OVER SOME OFFSHORE MARINE AREAS, ESPECIALLY
THOSE TO THE RIGHT OF THE STORM’S TRACK OVERNIGHT TONIGHT AND SUNDAY.
THERE ARE ALSO INDICATIONS THAT WAVES COULD LOCALLY EXCEED 18 METRES
FROM THE LAURENTIAN FAN INTO THE SOUTHERN GRAND BANKS, WITH LESSER
WAVE HEIGHTS FURTHER NORTH.

MARINE WARNINGS SUMMARY:

NEWFOUNDLAND WATERS: HURRICANE FORCE WIND WARNINGS ARE IN EFFECT FOR
THE NORTHERN GRAND BANKS AND THE SOUTHWESTERN GRAND BANKS.
STORM WARNINGS ARE IN EFFECT FOR THE SOUTH COAST, EAST COAST – CAPE
ST. FRANCIS AND SOUTH, AND THE SOUTHEASTERN GRAND BANKS. A GALE
WARNING IS IN EFFECT FOR THE FUNK ISLAND BANK – SOUTHERN HALF.

MARITIMES WATERS: A HURRICANE FORCE WIND WARNING IS IN EFFECT FOR
LAURENTIAN FAN – SOUTHEASTERN HALF. STORM WARNINGS ARE IN EFFECT FOR
LAURENTIAN FAN – NORTHWESTERN HALF AND BANQUEREAU – SOUTHEASTERN
HALF. GALE WARNINGS ARE IN EFFECT FOR EAST SCOTIAN SLOPE –
SOUTHEASTERN HALF AND BANQUEREAU NORTHWESTERN HALF.

VISIT WEATHEROFFICE.GC.CA/HURRICANE (ALL IN LOWER CASE) FOR THE
LATEST:

– FORECAST POSITION, CENTRAL PRESSURE TABLE.

– STRENGTH AND PREDICTED WIND RADII TABLE.

– HURRICANE TRACK INFORMATION MAP.

– TECHNICAL DISCUSSION.

PLEASE ALSO REFER TO THE PUBLIC AND MARINE FORECASTS AND WARNINGS
ISSUED BY ENVIRONMENT CANADA FOR YOUR AREA.

END/HATT/MERCER/FOGARTY
_______________________________________________
http://www.atl.ec.gc.ca/weather/hurricane/subscription_join_e.html

TSR logoN Atlantic: Storm Alert issued at 18 Oct, 2014 9:00 GMT

Hurricane GONZALO (AL08) currently located near 34.7 N 63.2 W is forecast to strike land to the following likelihood(s) at the given lead time(s):

Yellow Alert Country(s) or Province(s)
    Scotland
        probability for TS is 100% in about 69 hours
    England
        probability for TS is 100% in about 69 hours
    Ireland
        probability for TS is 100% in about 69 hours
    Northern Ireland
        probability for TS is 100% in about 69 hours
    the Isle of Man
        probability for TS is 95% in about 69 hours
    Wales
        probability for TS is 95% in about 69 hours
    Canada
        probability for CAT 1 or above is 30% in about 33 hours
        probability for TS is 90% in about 33 hours
    the Faeroe Islands
        probability for TS is 85% in about 69 hours
Yellow Alert City(s) and Town(s)
    Ullapool (58.0 N, 5.2 W)
        probability for TS is 100% in about 69 hours
    Portree (57.5 N, 6.2 W)
        probability for TS is 100% in about 69 hours
    Inverness (57.3 N, 4.3 W)
        probability for TS is 100% in about 69 hours
    Dundee (56.5 N, 3.0 W)
        probability for TS is 100% in about 69 hours
    Oban (56.3 N, 5.5 W)
        probability for TS is 100% in about 69 hours
    Glasgow (55.9 N, 4.3 W)
        probability for TS is 100% in about 69 hours
    Edinburgh (55.8 N, 3.1 W)
        probability for TS is 100% in about 69 hours
    Stranraer (55.0 N, 5.0 W)
        probability for TS is 100% in about 69 hours
    Ardara (54.8 N, 8.4 W)
        probability for TS is 100% in about 69 hours
    Belfast (54.6 N, 5.9 W)
        probability for TS is 100% in about 69 hours
    Workington (54.6 N, 3.4 W)
        probability for TS is 100% in about 69 hours
    Sligo (54.3 N, 8.4 W)
        probability for TS is 100% in about 69 hours
    Belmullet (54.2 N, 10.0 W)
        probability for TS is 100% in about 69 hours
    Galway (53.3 N, 9.1 W)
        probability for TS is 100% in about 69 hours
    Stornoway (58.3 N, 6.4 W)
        probability for TS is 95% in about 69 hours
    Dublin (53.3 N, 6.3 W)
        probability for TS is 95% in about 69 hours
    Holyhead (53.3 N, 4.5 W)
        probability for TS is 95% in about 69 hours
    Wexford (52.3 N, 6.5 W)
        probability for TS is 95% in about 69 hours
    Dingle (52.2 N, 10.2 W)
        probability for TS is 95% in about 69 hours
    Cork (51.9 N, 8.5 W)
        probability for TS is 95% in about 69 hours
    Bantry (51.7 N, 9.4 W)
        probability for TS is 95% in about 69 hours
    Wick (58.5 N, 3.1 W)
        probability for TS is 90% in about 69 hours
    Manchester (53.5 N, 2.3 W)
        probability for TS is 90% in about 69 hours
    Fishguard (51.9 N, 5.0 W)
        probability for TS is 90% in about 69 hours
    Kirkwall (59.0 N, 3.0 W)
        probability for TS is 85% in about 69 hours
    Aberdeen (57.2 N, 2.1 W)
        probability for TS is 85% in about 69 hours
    Newcastle (55.0 N, 1.6 W)
        probability for TS is 85% in about 69 hours
    York (54.2 N, 1.5 W)
        probability for TS is 85% in about 69 hours
    Torshavn (62.0 N, 6.8 W)
        probability for TS is 80% in about 69 hours
    Birmingham (52.5 N, 1.9 W)
        probability for TS is 80% in about 69 hours
    Cardiff (51.5 N, 3.2 W)
        probability for TS is 80% in about 69 hours
    Lands End (50.1 N, 5.6 W)
        probability for TS is 75% in about 69 hours
    St John’s (47.6 N, 52.7 W)
        probability for CAT 1 or above is 10% in about 33 hours
        probability for TS is 70% in about 33 hours
    Hull (53.8 N, 0.1 W)
        probability for TS is 70% in about 69 hours
    Weymouth (50.6 N, 2.4 W)
        probability for TS is 70% in about 69 hours
    Torquay (50.3 N, 3.7 W)
        probability for TS is 70% in about 69 hours
    Southampton (50.9 N, 1.4 W)
        probability for TS is 65% in about 69 hours
    Lerwick (60.2 N, 1.2 W)
        probability for TS is 55% in about 69 hours
    Cambridge (52.2 N, 0.3 E)
        probability for TS is 55% in about 69 hours

Note that
Yellow Alert (Elevated) is CAT 1 or above to between 10% and 30% probability, or TS to above 50% probability.
CAT 1 means Hurricane strength winds of at least 74 mph, 119 km/h or 64 knots 1-min sustained.
TS means Tropical Storm strength winds of at least 39 mph, 63 km/h or 34 knots 1-min sustained.

For graphical forecast information and further details please visit http://www.tropicalstormrisk.com/

Storm Tracker Map

MARITIME/SHIPPING

METAREA4 / HURRICANE_ADVISORY / 181454

WTNT23 KNHC 181454
TCMAT3

HURRICANE GONZALO FORECAST/ADVISORY NUMBER 25
NWS NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL AL082014
1500 UTC SAT OCT 18 2014

CHANGES IN WATCHES AND WARNINGS WITH THIS ADVISORY…

NONE.

SUMMARY OF WATCHES AND WARNINGS IN EFFECT…

A TROPICAL STORM WATCH IS EFFECT FOR…
* ARNOLDS COVE TO CHAPELS COVE NEWFOUNDLAND

A TROPICAL STORM WATCH MEANS THAT TROPICAL STORM CONDITIONS ARE
POSSIBLE WITHIN THE WATCH AREA…IN THIS CASE WITHIN 12 TO 24 HOURS.

HURRICANE CENTER LOCATED NEAR 36.8N 61.7W AT 18/1500Z
POSITION ACCURATE WITHIN 25 NM

PRESENT MOVEMENT TOWARD THE NORTH-NORTHEAST OR 30 DEGREES AT 22 KT

ESTIMATED MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE 966 MB
MAX SUSTAINED WINDS 80 KT WITH GUSTS TO 100 KT.
64 KT……. 60NE 60SE 50SW 50NW.
50 KT……. 90NE 100SE 80SW 70NW.
34 KT…….150NE 180SE 120SW 120NW.
12 FT SEAS..300NE 300SE 220SW 320NW.
WINDS AND SEAS VARY GREATLY IN EACH QUADRANT. RADII IN NAUTICAL
MILES ARE THE LARGEST RADII EXPECTED ANYWHERE IN THAT QUADRANT.

REPEAT…CENTER LOCATED NEAR 36.8N 61.7W AT 18/1500Z
AT 18/1200Z CENTER WAS LOCATED NEAR 35.5N 62.8W

FORECAST VALID 19/0000Z 40.8N 58.3W
MAX WIND 70 KT…GUSTS 85 KT.
64 KT… 60NE 60SE 50SW 50NW.
50 KT… 90NE 100SE 80SW 70NW.
34 KT…150NE 180SE 120SW 120NW.

FORECAST VALID 19/1200Z 47.0N 50.5W…POST-TROP/EXTRATROP
MAX WIND 60 KT…GUSTS 75 KT.
50 KT… 80NE 100SE 70SW 60NW.
34 KT…150NE 210SE 150SW 100NW.

FORECAST VALID 20/0000Z 51.3N 38.7W…POST-TROP/EXTRATROP
MAX WIND 55 KT…GUSTS 65 KT.
50 KT… 0NE 120SE 90SW 0NW.
34 KT… 90NE 240SE 180SW 100NW.

FORECAST VALID 20/1200Z 53.5N 23.5W…POST-TROP/EXTRATROP
MAX WIND 45 KT…GUSTS 55 KT.
34 KT… 60NE 240SE 320SW 120NW.

FORECAST VALID 21/1200Z…DISSIPATED

REQUEST FOR 3 HOURLY SHIP REPORTS WITHIN 300 MILES OF 36.8N 61.7W

NEXT ADVISORY AT 18/2100Z

$$
FORECASTER LANDSEA

METAREA4 / HIGH_SEAS_FORECAST / 181603

FZNT01 KWBC 181603
HSFAT1

HIGH SEAS FORECAST FOR METAREA IV
NWS OCEAN PREDICTION CENTER WASHINGTON DC
1630 UTC SAT OCT 18 2014

CCODE/2:31:04:11:00/AOW+AOE/NWS/CCODE
SUPERSEDED BY NEXT ISSUANCE IN 6 HOURS

SEAS GIVEN AS SIGNIFICANT WAVE HEIGHT…WHICH IS THE AVERAGE
HEIGHT OF THE HIGHEST 1/3 OF THE WAVES. INDIVIDUAL WAVES MAY
BE MORE THAN TWICE THE SIGNIFICANT WAVE HEIGHT

PAN PAN

NORTH ATLANTIC NORTH OF 31N TO 67N AND WEST OF 35W

SYNOPSIS VALID 1200 UTC OCT 18
24 HOUR FORECAST VALID 1200 UTC OCT 19
48 HOUR FORECAST VALID 1200 UTC OCT 20

.WARNINGS.

..HURRICANE WARNING…
.HURRICANE GONZALO NEAR 36.8N 61.7W 966 MB AT 1500 UTC OCT 18
MOVING NNE OR 030 DEG AT 22 KT. MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS 80 KT
GUSTS 100 KT. TROPICAL STORM FORCE WINDS WITHIN 120 NM W
SEMICIRCLE…150 NM NE QUADRANT AND 180 NM SE QUADRANT. SEAS 12
FT OR GREATER WITHIN 300 NM E SEMICIRCLE…220 NM SW QUADRANT
AND 320 NM NW QUADRANT WITH SEAS TO 47 FT.
.24 HOUR FORECAST POST-TROPICAL GONZALO NEAR 47.0N
50.5W 980 MB. WITHIN 120 NM NE…180 NM SE AND 120 NM SW
QUADRANTS WINDS 45 TO 60 KT. SEAS 20 TO 40 FT. ELSEWHERE WITHIN
180 NM NW…240 NM NE…420 NM SE AND 360 NM SW QUADRANTS WINDS
30 TO 45 KT. SEAS 15 TO 30 FT. ALSO WITHIN 300 NM NE…540 NM SE
AND 660 NM SW QUADRANTS WINDS 20 TO 30 KT. SEAS 12 TO 25 FT.
.48 HOUR FORECAST POST-TROPICAL GONZALO E OF AREA NEAR 53.5N
23.5W 993 MB. FORECAST CONDITIONS MOVED E OF AREA.
.72 HOUR FORECAST…DISSIPATED.

…GALE WARNING…
.LOW 56N56W 992 MB MOVING NE 25 KT. WITHIN 660 NM NE…420 NM NE
AND 780 NM SE QUADRANTS WINDS 20 TO 30 KT. SEAS 8 TO 13 FT.
.12 HOUR FORECAST LOW 58N45W 991 MB. WITHIN 540 NM NW AND 240 NM
NE QUADRANTS WINDS 25 TO 40 KT. SEAS 8 TO 14 FT.
.24 HOUR FORECAST LOW 58N37W 993 MB. WITHIN 720 NM NW AND 420 NM
SW QUADRANTS WINDS 20 TO 30 KT. SEAS 8 TO 14 FT.
.48 HOUR FORECAST LOW AND CONDITIONS MOVED E OF AREA.

…GALE WARNING…
.24 HOUR FORECAST FROM 31N TO 45N BETWEEN 60W AND 80W WINDS 20
TO 30 KT. SEAS TO 12 FT.
.48 HOUR FORECAST LOW INLAND 50N57W 991 MB. WITHIN 660 NM S
SEMICIRCLE AND 480 NM NE QUADRANT WINDS 25 TO 35 KT. SEAS 8 TO
16 FT. ELSEWHERE FROM 35N TO 58N BETWEEN 40W AND 70W WINDS TO 25
KT. SEAS TO 12 FT.

.SYNOPSIS AND FORECAST.

.EXCEPT WHERE NOTED WITH HURRICANE GONZALO IN WARNINGS SECTION
ABOVE FROM 31N TO 43N BETWEEN 49W AND 70W WINDS 20 TO 33 KT.
SEAS TO 12 FT.
.24 HOUR FORECAST CONDITIONS DESCRIBED WITH POST-TROPICAL
GONZALO IN WARNINGS SECTION ABOVE.

.FROM 31N TO 66N E OF 46W WINDS 20 TO 30 KT. SEAS 10 TO 20 FT.
.24 HOUR FORECAST FROM 31N TO 52N E OF 41W WINDS TO 25 KT. SEAS
8 TO 14 FT.
.48 HOUR FORECAST FROM 31N TO 55N E OF 40W WINDS 20 TO 30 KT.
SEAS 8 TO 16 FT.

.24 HOUR FORECAST FROM 63N TO 66N E OF 38W WINDS TO 25 KT. SEAS
8 TO 13 FT.
.48 HOUR FORECAST FROM 57N TO 66N E OF 42W WINDS TO 25 KT. SEAS
8 TO 14 FT.

.DENSE FOG. VSBY OCCASIONALLY LESS THAN 1 NM FROM 43N TO 47N
BETWEEN 53W AND 59W AND FROM 48N TO 56N BETWEEN 49W AND 56W.
.24 HOUR FORECAST DENSE FOG FROM 41N TO 53N BETWEEN 43W AND 57W
AND FROM 49N TO 54N E OF 42W.
.48 HOUR FORECAST DENSE FOG FROM 41N TO 55N BETWEEN 42W AND 58W.

.HIGH 41N45W 1027 MB MOVING E 15 KT.
.24 HOUR FORECAST HIGH 41N38W 1029 MB.
.48 HOUR FORECAST LITTLE CHANGE.

.FORECASTER HOLLEY. OCEAN PREDICTION CENTER.

NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL

ATLANTIC FROM 07N TO 31N W OF 35W INCLUDING CARIBBEAN SEA AND
GULF OF MEXICO

SYNOPSIS VALID 1200 UTC SAT OCT 18.
24 HOUR FORECAST VALID 1200 UTC SUN OCT 19.
48 HOUR FORECAST VALID 1200 UTC MON OCT 20.

.WARNINGS.

.NONE.

.SYNOPSIS AND FORECAST.

.N OF 29.5N BETWEEN 58W AND 64W S TO SW WINDS 20 TO 25 KT. SEAS
12 TO 14 FT. N OF 25N BETWEEN 40W AND 55W E WINDS 20 TO 25 KT.
SEAS 9 TO 12 FT. ELSEWHERE N OF LINE 31N74W TO 20N60W TO 20N35W
WINDS 20 KT OR LESS. SEAS 8 TO 13 FT IN A BROAD MIX OF SWELL.
.24 HOUR FORECAST N OF 28N BETWEEN 44W AND 52W E TO SE WINDS 20
TO 25 KT. SEAS 10 TO 12 FT. ELSEWHERE E OF LINE 31N59W TO 13N35W
WINDS 20 KT OR LESS. SEAS 8 TO 10 FT IN NE AND N SWELL.
.48 HOUR FORECAST NE OF LINE 31N54W TO 20N35W WINDS 20 KT OR
LESS. SEAS TO 9 FT IN N SWELL.

.REMAINDER OF AREA WINDS 20 KT OR LESS. SEAS LESS THAN 8 FT.

$$
.FORECASTER CHRISTENSEN. NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER.
================================================

PassageWeather is a FREE sailing weather website:

http://www.passageweather.com/

Do not use any information on this site for life or death decisions. All information is intended as supplementary to official sources. Kindly refer to your country’s official weather agency/government website for local warnings, advisories and bulletins.

UK SEVERE WEATHER and FLOOD WARNINGS – Updated 20 Aug 2014 1930z (GMT/UTC)

Updated here:

https://goatysnews.wordpress.com/2014/10/26/uk-severe-weather-and-flood-warnings-updated-26-oct-2014-0751z-gmtutc/

Do not use any information on this site for life or death decisions. All information is intended as supplementary to official sources. Kindly refer to your country’s official weather agency/government website for local warnings, advisories and bulletins.

UK SEVERE WEATHER and FLOOD WARNINGS – Updated 25 Aug 2014 1717z (GMT/UTC)

Updated here

http://wp.me/p2k2mU-3th

 

Do not use any information on this site for life or death decisions. All information is intended as supplementary to official sources. Kindly refer to your country’s official weather agency/government website for local warnings, advisories and bulletins.

Scotland: Barra and Tobermory lifeboats assist stricken cargo ship 30 miles SW of Tiree (Video) – Published 140414 1548z

Tobermory RNLI lifeboat returned to its station this morning after a 17 hour, 180 mile rescue mission to assist a stricken cargo ship. Barra Island RNLI lifeboat will be returning to stand by later today (13 April 2013).

The Tobermory crew relieved the Barra Island lifeboat last night and stood by the 88 metre cargo ship (G: MV Wilson Gdynia) which is now drifting some 30 miles south west of Tiree in rough weather. Given that the cargo ship is drifting in a north westerly direction and is not in danger of encountering any hazards at present, Stornoway Coastguard stood down the Tobermory lifeboat at daybreak.

Having spent more than 14 hours on the ‘shout’ yesterday, Barra Island lifeboat will return to the cargo ship to provide assistance this evening until the arrival of an ocean going tug which is currently en route from Aberdeen and is expected to arrive in the early hours of Monday morning. The cargo ship has eight crew on board.

Tobermory RNLI Coxswain Andrew McHaffie said: ‘This was a long shout in difficult conditions with seas of up to ten metres at times.’


(Video credit: RNLI)

Published on Apr 14, 2014

A 88-metre cargo ship with steering problems battling gale force winds and seas of up to ten metres 15 miles west of the Skerryvore light house. Lifeboats from Barra and Tobermory stood by for over 24 hours.

Key facts about the RNLI

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution is the charity that saves lives at sea. Our volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland from 236 lifeboat stations, including four along the River Thames and inland lifeboat stations at Loch Ness, Lough Derg, Enniskillen and Lough Ree. Additionally the RNLI has more than 1,000 lifeguards on over 180 beaches around the UK and operates a specialist flood rescue team, which can respond anywhere across the UK and Ireland when inland flooding puts lives at risk.

The RNLI relies on public donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. As a charity it is separate from, but works alongside, government-controlled and funded coastguard services. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824 our lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved at least 140,000 lives. Volunteers make up 95% of the charity, including 4,600 volunteer lifeboat crew members and 3,000 volunteer shore crew. Additionally, tens of thousands of other dedicated volunteers raise funds and awareness, give safety advice, and help in our museums, shops and offices.

Spring has sprung

Official blog of the Met Office news team

Warmer, drier weather is on the way for parts of the country.  As we move through the week a north–south divide develops across the UK with Scotland, Northern Ireland, northern England and parts of Wales being changeable and windy. However in the south high pressure will dominate  bringing dry weather for the weekend, with the best of the weather in the Southeast.

Temperatures are expected to reach mid to high teens in the South this weekend (8th – 9th March), while northwest England and Scotland are likely to see spells of strong winds and rain and there is a risk of overnight frosts.

This is in sharp contrast to the record breaking winter we have just experienced.  It was the wettest winter for the UK, England, Wales and Scotland, and the second wettest winter for Northern Ireland in the record series dating from 1910. It was the stormiest…

View original post 138 more words

The Order of St John and Mountain Rescue?

heavywhalley

I bet few who use the Outdoors know about the wonderful work of the Order Of St John and its incredible assistance to Mountain Rescue in Scotland? Hope fully after reading this you may have an idea of what work they have done.

Order of st John Logo

This is the copy of a letter I wrote to the Order when I retired from Mountain Rescue. Firstly please accept my sincere apologies for not writing before to thank you for all your great work for the Mountain Rescue Committee of Scotland over the year for the Mountain Rescue Committee of Scotland over the years. I was the Chairman of the Mountain Rescue Committee in the early nineties when we were first approached by the Order of St John who wanted to assist Mountain Rescue in Scotland.

I was at that time in the RAF and serving at RAF Kinloss in Morayshire. I was the Team…

View original post 835 more words

UK Weather: How stormy has it been and why?

Official blog of the Met Office news team

Since the start of December the UK has seen a prolonged period of particularly unsettled weather, with a series of storms tracking in off the Atlantic bringing strong winds and heavy rain.

The windiest month since 1993

In order to compare the recent spell with the numerous stormy periods of weather in the past the Met Office’s National Climate Information Centre has done an analysis of the number of weather stations in the UK which have registered winds over certain thresholds since the start of December.

This measure suggests that December 2013 is the stormiest December in records dating back to 1969 and is one of the windiest calendar months for the UK since January 1993.

December was also a very wet month across the UK, particularly in Scotland where it was the wettest December and wettest month overall in the records dating back to 1910.

But why has this…

View original post 447 more words

Our change in the weather and how the jet stream is driving it

Official blog of the Met Office news team

After a quiet spell of weather courtesy of a slow moving area of high pressure, we are now entering an unsettled period as a series of Atlantic depressions are expected to pass close to the northwest of Britain during the next week.

High pressure has now moved away and is settled over Europe and a powerful jet stream is developing over the Atlantic which will be the main driving force behind this spell of unsettled weather.

What is the jet stream?

The jet stream is a band of fast moving westerly winds high up in the atmosphere which circle around the pole in the northern hemisphere. It can feature winds of up to 200 knots (230 mph) or more, and these winds tend to guide wet and windy weather systems which come in off the Atlantic.

The jet moves around a fair bit and its position can have a big…

View original post 406 more words

UK: Two walkers flown to safety after Cairngorms rescue near Devil’s Point – 291013 1500z

Police Scotland can confirm that they were called to assist with a mountain rescue in the central Cairngorms on Monday, October 28, at around 6.45pm, after two male walkers reported they were lost in the Devils Point area, near Cairn Toul.

File:Cairngorms-sketch-map.jpg

A full mountain rescue deployment was immediately launched, building to eight mountain rescue teams, as well as the RAF Search and Rescue helicopter from RAF Lossiemouth.

The lost walkers were found by searchers in a very precarious location on the high plateau at around 8.15am, suffering the effects of hypothermia and exhaustion. They were then evacuated by helicopter to the Mountain Rescue Centre at Braemar.

Chief Inspector Andrew Todd, team leader of the Police Scotland (Grampian) Mountain Rescue Team, said:
This mountain rescue incident gave us grave cause for concern as the lives of these individuals were clearly in jeopardy.
Specially-trained and experienced mountain rescue officers worked through the night with volunteers from both the Braemar and Aberdeen mountain rescue teams. We brought in support from volunteer teams in both Tayside and the Highlands & Islands, as well as search and rescue dogs and the RAF, so that we could find the hill walkers before they succumbed to cold, wet and exhaustion.
It was very rewarding for all those involved when we found them. They were on very steep ground and unable to move, but we were able to evacuate them safely back to Braemar. Thankfully, they did not sustain any serious injuries and were able to return home after they were checked over at the Mountain Rescue Centre.” Lomond Mountain Rescue Team

Other reports

Two walkers flown to safety after Cairngorms rescue near Devil’s Point

BBC

Two walkers were flown to safety after a major overnight search in the Cairngorms.

Braemar and Aberdeen mountain rescue teams were among those assisted by a helicopter from RAF Lossiemouth during the operation.

They faced blizzard conditions in the Devil’s Point area, near Cairn Toul.

The alarm was raised on Monday night. The two men were found in a “precarious location” at about 08:15, suffering the effects of hypothermia and exhaustion.

‘Very rewarding’

Ch Insp Andrew Todd, team leader of the Police Scotland (Grampian) Mountain Rescue Team, said: “This mountain rescue incident gave us grave cause for concern as the lives of these individuals were clearly in jeopardy.

“Specially-trained and experienced mountain rescue officers worked through the night with volunteers from both the Braemar and Aberdeen mountain rescue teams.

“We brought in support from volunteer teams in both Tayside and the Highlands and Islands, as well as search and rescue dogs and the RAF, so that we could find the hill walkers before they succumbed to cold, wet and exhaustion.”

He added: “It was very rewarding for all those involved when we found them.

“Thankfully, they did not sustain any serious injuries and were able to return home after they were checked over.”

Related

Cairngorm John’s guide to staying safe in the mountains this winter

“For many people, the lure of tackling Scotlands mountains in winter is irresistible.

The prospect of walking, climbing or skiing on pristine-white slopes, amid a sun-drenched vista, carries understandable attractions for all those who enjoy outdoor pursuits.

Yet, as John Allen, the man who led the Cairngorm Mountain Rescue team from 1989 to 2007, is only too aware, there are few things more foolhardy than taking to the hills without adequate precautions to ensure a terrific day out isnt transformed into a terrifying white-out.

Allen penned his autobiography, Cairngorm John (Sandstone Publishing) last year and recounted his myriad experiences on the mountains, where the weather can close in on unsuspecting climbers in the space of a few moments.

And he has witnessed enough tragedies to realise that you can never tame Nature to the stage where you have eliminated risk altogether.

Indeed, the winter of 2012-13 was a pretty grim season on the slopes. In January, four climbers perished on Glencoe, a walker subsequently died in the Cairngorms, and three others lost their lives, following a devastating avalanche in February.

Allen knows as much as anybody about the ferocity of the conditions during these incidents.

He said: It is positively Arctic. The wind can pick you up and physically throw you in the air. The visibility can be reduced by blinding snow and cloud to one or two metres and the temperature is regularly well below -18C.

Your domestic freezer runs at that temperature. That will freeze beef or even horse meat. Most climbers simply cannot comprehend what these conditions are like.

So, when you go to the mountains, it will never be entirely risk-free. But it should be remembered that avalanche conditions can be recognised and steps taken to avoid them.

John Allen’s top eight tips for those on the mountains in winter.

via STV via STV
  • Do NOT go out unless you can comfortably navigate in mist or darkness using a Silva-type compass and Ordnance Survey map. Your map should be protected from the damp – a freezer bag will do nicely.
  • Never go out without consulting the avalanche forecast and the weather forecast. (There are plenty of good web sites, such as http://www.stv.tv).
  • Do NOT go out without your ice axe and crampons and head torch. Practice your ice axe braking techniques at the start of the winter. Replace the batteries on your head torch.
  • Be prepared to alter your route or turn back. There is no shame in making a retreat. In fact, it is often the mark of the experienced mountaineer that they can make the disciplined retreat.
  • Never rely only on your mobile phone. There are many areas where there is no signal. Keep your phone switched off to preserve batteries. Do NOT rely on an App map for your navigation or the compass on your phone. (One of our team members once said that if your phone was dead, the only way to attract the attention of the CMRT would be to throw the phone at them!)
  • Don’t rely on Global Positioning Satellite devices. They are not always correct and, in a deep corrie or valley, you may not get three satellites to give your position.
  • Good winter boots and outer shell clothing are, of course, a necessity.
  • Dialling 999 should be a last resort – only used after considering all the options.

One last thought….

At the end of the day, we can never eliminate all the risks of being in the hills.

There is the quote from many years ago which I often use: If you go into the mountains, if you want to see what beauty they offer, you have to accept that the mountains can take as well as give.

These words were spoken by a woman who had lost her father, nearly 50 years ago, while he was guiding on the Tour Ronde. They are worth remembering by everyone.

Mountain Weather Forecasts (Met Office)

Search & Rescue News (Goatys News)

 

Scotland: Helicopter ditches in North Sea off Shetland – 4 oil workers dead (named), 14 others rescued – 240813 1635z

Three people were missing after a helicopter carrying 18 people crashed into the sea off the coast of Scotland on Friday.

The Coastguard said 15 people had been rescued and were taken to hospital, but three are unaccounted for.

The incident happened near the Shetland Islands, northeast of Edinburgh, and involved a Super Puma helicopter taking 16 passengers and two crew members to and from oil and gas platforms.

The Department of Transport issued an statement on behalf on the Air Accidents Investigation Branch stating it was “aware of incident” and has deployed a team. An air and sea search is continuing, with three helicopters and two lifeboats involved.

“Our two lifeboats are searching for those three unaccounted for,” said Tim Ash, a spokesman for Royal National Lifeboat Institution. Wreckage from the crash has been spotted, said Ash, who added that rescue teams were dealing with strong tides and poor visibility. “Winds are not particularly strong but visibility is not good. Those are the circumstances that our volunteers are facing,” he said.

A spokeswoman for the Coastguard said two life rafts from the helicopter were located and found empty.

Saturday, 24 August, 2013 at 04:21 (04:21 AM) UTC RSOE

Other reports

Helicopter Crash: Four Dead In North Sea

SKY NEWS 2:46pm UK, Saturday 24 August 2013

The helicopter suffered a “catastrophic loss of power” and ended up upside down in the North Sea, triggering a massive rescue.

“Police have named the four oil workers who died after a helicopter ditched into the sea on its way to Shetland.

(Video credit:  turan utkan)

The victims are: Duncan Munro, 46, from Bishop Auckland; Sarah Darnley, 45, from Elgin; Gary McCrossan , 59, from Inverness; and George Allison, 57, from Winchester.

The Super Puma L2 went down at approximately 6.27pm on Friday, around two miles west of Sumburgh airport as it was returning to Shetland from the Borgsten Dolphin platform.

The helicopter was carrying 16 workers and two crew.

“The bodies of three people have been recovered and work is underway to recover the body of the fourth person,” Police Scotland said in a statement.

Shetland helicopter crash
At least three of the dead had trouble escaping the upturned helicopter

The body of the fourth victim is understood to be in the wreckage of the aircraft.

All the families have been informed.

A search operation involving coastguard, police, RAF and local lifeboats was able to rescue 14 people from the sea, including the two crew. They were taken to Gilbert Bain Hospital in Lerwick.

“Five were discharged and nine detained overnight either for observation or suffering from exposure,” the police statement said.

The helicopter is reported to be in several pieces but the wreckage has now been secured by the RNLI (Royal National Lifeboat Institution).

A victim is stretchered
One of the rescued workers is moved on a stretcher

Helicopter operator CHC, which operates in 30 countries, said on its website that it was temporarily suspending all Super Puma L2 flights worldwide as a precaution.

It has also suspended flights in Aberdeen “as a mark of respect”.

Amanda Smith, the mother of one of the workers, Sam Smith, said that her son had telephoned her from hospital after suffering cuts in the crash.

She told Sky News: “He said it seemed to lose power and there was no time to brace, they just dropped into the sea.

“He was by the window so he was able to escape that way as it rolled over.

“He said he had come off better than a lot of people. It didn’t seem real, I would say two hours later it’s just beginning to sink in.”

CHC said it was flying for French oil company Total and that the aircraft had lost communication as it approached the airport on the southern tip of Shetland’s main island.

Victims of the crash walking from the coastguard rescue helicopter
Some of those rescued were able to walk unaided after the rescue

The four people who died were working for Total through contractor organisations.

A CHC spokesman said: “The aircraft was on approach to Sumburgh Airport at approximately 6.20pm when contact was lost with air traffic control.”

Mark Abbey, regional director for CHC, expressed his “heartfelt sympathies to all those involved” but said the company would not be speculating about the cause of the crash.

Investigators from the Department for Transport’s Air Accidents Investigation Branch are looking into the incident.

The helicopter was upside down in the water when rescuers arrived, said Sky’s James Matthews in Aberdeen.

“At least three of the four who died had trouble getting out of the wreckage. One body remains in there this morning,” said Matthews.

The survivors were aided by waterproof immersion suits that helped keep them afloat and warm in the North Sea.

The tide – which was heading towards the land – also helped survivors.

Jim Nicholson, RNLI rescue co-ordinator, said: “There appears to have been a catastrophic loss of power which meant the helicopter suddenly dropped into the sea without any opportunity to make a controlled landing.”

Last year, two Super Puma helicopters ditched in the North Sea only six months apart.

All passengers and crew were rescued in both incidents, which were found to be caused by gearbox problems.

Helicopter crash off Shetland islands
Several helicopters have been involved in the search operation

However, the latest incident marks the fourth in four years involving Super Puma aircraft.

In April 2009, 16 people died when a helicopter returning from BP’s Miller platform crashed 11 miles from Peterhead after a “catastrophic failure” in part of its main gearbox.

The Unite union’s Scottish Secretary, Pat Rafferty, said the safety record was “unacceptable” and called on the oil and gas industry to use “every means at their disposal to demonstrate that its fleet is fit for purpose”.

Bob Crow, head of the RMT union, said he expected an “outpouring of  anger” after the latest incident.

“The entire Super Puma fleet must remain grounded until the causes of this latest event are established,” said Mr Crow.

 CHC has set up a helpline for concerned relatives on 01224 296 866.

” – SKY NEWS

Videos

Shetland Helicopter Crash: Four Fatalities

(Video credit: VIRALTV2013 )

Shetland Helicopter Crash Four Dead Named

(Video credit:  DailyNews779)

Published on Aug 24, 2013

They were Duncan Munro, 46, from Bishop Auckland, Sarah Darnley, 45, from Elgin, Gary McCrossan, 59, from Inverness, and George Allison, 57, from Winchester.

Three of the four bodies have been recovered. Police Scotland confirmed 14 others were rescued.

The Super Puma L2 helicopter crashed west of Sumburgh Airport at about 18:20 BST on Friday.

An investigation into the cause of the tragedy is under way.

RNLI rescue co-ordinator Jim Nicholson said the helicopter – carrying workers from an oil rig – apparently suffered a “catastrophic loss of power”.

He said it appeared the aircraft had “suddenly dropped into the sea without any opportunity to make a controlled landing”.
Amanda Smith, whose son Sam was on the helicopter, told Sky News it suddenly lost power and those on board had “no time to brace”.

“He was by the window so he was able to escape that way as it rolled over,” she said.

“He said he had come off better than a lot of people, [those] were his words.”

Tim Ripley, an aviation expert with Jane’s Defence Weekly, told the BBC there were “many possible scenarios” behind the helicopter crash.

He said: “The most common one at low level for aircraft and helicopters is bird strikes.

“If one of these helicopters ingested a bird it would cause a very, very nasty accident.

“But it doesn’t seem like that because we have no reports of collisions, which points towards a failure of the engine and the mechanical systems on the helicopter.”

A total of 18 people were on board the helicopter.The 14 survivors, including the two crew members, were taken to Gilbert Bain Hospital in Lerwick for treatment.

Police Scotland said five were discharged a short time later and nine were detained overnight either for observation or suffering from exposure.

The ditched helicopter was found broken into several pieces up against rocks.

Boats, including a ferry and a cargo ship, joined lifeboat crews from Lerwick and Aith and helicopters from the coastguard, RAF Lossiemouth and two Bond rescue helicopters to search for survivors.

The AS332 L2 helicopter, carrying passengers crew from the Borgsten Dolphin oil rig in the North Sea, was operated by CHC for Total, taking people to and from oil and gas installations.

Oil firm Total confirmed that the three men and one woman who died all worked for contract organisations.

‘Lost power’
Earlier, Mr Nicholson told the BBC the helicopter had been in a “fairly inaccessible position… near the cliffs”, with weather in the area not “particularly good”.
A CHC spokesman confirmed that an L2 aircraft landed in the water, approximately two miles west of Sumburgh on Friday.

“The aircraft was on approach to Sumburgh Airport at approximately 6.20pm when contact was lost with air traffic control,” he said.

In a later statement, the company said the cause of the incident was unknown but Super Puma L2 flights would be suspended worldwide.

“Also, in deference to the incident and the investigation, we are suspending all flights [on] Saturday by our UK operations,” the company added.

Bond Offshore Helicopters also said it would not be operating any of its Super Puma aircraft fleet, with the exception of its Jigsaw rescue aircraft which would be available for life at risk missions.

Michael Bull, whose son Samuel was rescued, said: “We understand he was on his way back from a rig and the helicopter lost power suddenly and immediately ditched into the water.

“He managed to escape straight away because he was right by an exit and I understand soon afterwards that the helicopter turned over.”

Aith RNLI Lifeboat crew retrieve helicopter wreckage in Shetland

(Video credit: officialrnli)

Published on Aug 24, 2013

Aith Lifeboat crew tow Super Puma helicopter which crashed into the sea off Sumburgh, Shetland, on the night of 23/24 August 2013. Four lives were lost from the helicopter.

 

UK: Coastguard warning to Bank Holiday walkers after 5th injured walker rescued – 260513 1615z

Coastguards from Rhum & Skye rescue injured walker on Rhum, 5th such incident on Saturday

(Photo: wikimedia.org) Harris, Isle of Rhum

At 9:30pm on Saturday, the coastguard rescue helicopter from Stornoway was sent to rescue a lady who had collapsed and was struggling to remain conscious on the Isle of Rhum.

 

 

Unfortunately, when the rescue helicopter reached the island, the weather had closed in and the cloud cover was too low to fly in to locate the casualty. The Rhum Coastguard Rescue Team started to walk in to the ladys position while the rescue helicopter returned to Skye to refuel and to collect the Portree Coastguard Rescue Team to help with the evacuation of the lady.

 

 

Rhum and Portree Coastguards made their way to the injured lady on foot and found her conscious but very cold and unable to walk. They made her comfortable and placed her in a stretcher ready for extraction. Carrying the stretcher through Harris Glen towards the coast, they were able to get the lady to a location suitable for the rescue helicopter to fly to meet them as the weather lifted. The casualty was then transported to Hospital in Broadford.

(Image: backpackingbongos.files.wordpress.com) Rhum

 

 

The coastguard rescue helicopter from Stornoway had already been to four different incidents involving injured walkers on Saturday in Skye, Kintail and Crianlarich.

 

 

Carol Collins, Stornoway Coastguard Watch Manager says,

 

With so many people enjoying a chance to get out walking over the bank holiday weekend our advice for walkers is to be prepared. Make sure you are properly equipped for walking along coastal paths. Wear sturdy shoes or boots and check the weather forecast before you set out. Do not attempt to climb up or down cliffs unless you are properly equipped and trained. Do not try to climb cliffs as a short cut back to the top. Do not attempt self rescue, if you get into difficulty, call 999 and ask for the coastguard.

UK: Snow ploughs in action after sandstorms in Scotland – 170413 1540z

Sandstorms have affected towns and roads along the north-east and Moray coasts. There have been reports of sandstorms in places including Fraserburgh, Forres, Banff and Elgin.

(Above video credit: Marek Laszczka)

(Video credit: whytewitch59632)

(Video credit: helen1434)
Erika Cartney, who works at the Tesco store in Fraserburgh which was hit by the sandstorm, said: “I’ve never seen anything like it. It’s like fog but it’s sand. “It’s still going on but on the other side of town it’s a beautiful sunny day. I had to pull my hood up and cover my eyes – it’s really gritty and was getting in my mouth. “It’s just getting everywhere. It’s just like thick fog. I’ve never seen anything like that before in Fraserburgh.”
Police Scotland are warning motorists to take care in the conditions. A spokesman said: “High winds causing sand storms in the area, several roads being affected by sand. Visibility very poor in places. Some routes also affected by fallen trees.”

The force is also advising motorists to avoid the A941 Elgin-Rothes road. He added: “High winds have caused zero visibility due to sand which has blown across road. The recommended diversion is via B9103 and B9015.” Flights were also delayed at Inverness airport due to the conditions. The Met Office currently has a yellow weather warning in place across Grampian for high winds. STV weatherman Sean Batty said: “After an exceptionally dry March, and for some areas the driest March on record, the soil has dried out on the farmlands and along with today’s winds this has allowed this to become airborne. “This has given us the blowing dust which has been reported at many Moray weather stations as well as at Inverness airport on Tuesday.
Tuesday, 16 April, 2013 at 16:54 (04:54 PM) UTC RSOE

News Reports

“Snow ploughs have been brought in to tackle the aftermath of sandstorms that hit the north-east and Moray coasts.

Moray Council said the clean-up operation could take several weeks and the local authority has dispatched its winter maintenance crews to clear sand drifts from some roads.

A spokesman for the local authority said a few routes had been closed by the conditions including the A941 Elgin-Rothes road was blocked at Fogwatt but has since reopened and the Mosstodloch-Garmouth road.

Among roads still currently closed are the Wester Alves road between Coltfield crossroads and the B9089 and the eastern end of the Auchtertyre road.

He said “thousands of tons of soil were blown off farmers’ fields by two days of gale force winds which also brought down about 20 trees.

He added: Our winter maintenance fleet is out including ploughs and diggers. There are a few three to four roads still closed and being worked on. We would hope to have those roads open today.

Main roads were also being given priority by crews and that some minor roads which had been affected were still open but had narrowed in places.

He said: It could be several weeks before the clean-up operation is complete. Some roads are passable with care.

“The rain forecast for later this morning could add to the difficulties because drainage gullies may be blocked and result in flooding. Wet, compacted sand is also more difficult to shift and may require to be dug out by excavators.

“Some roads are likely to be affected by sand for some time to come and we would urge motorists to take extra care.” – STV

Scotland: 80th anniversary of first Loch Ness monster sighting – 140413 1545z

One of the worlds greatest mysteries will be celebrated tomorrow when a special boat trip marks the 80th anniversary of the first modern sighting of the Loch Ness Monster.

On April 14 1933, Mrs Aldie Mackay, manageress of the Drumnadrochit Hotel, spoke of seeing a “whale-like fish” in the loch. Alex Campbell, a water bailiff and part-time journalist, recorded the sighting in the Inverness Courier, under the headline: “Strange Spectacle in Loch Ness”.

Exactly eight decades on since Mrs Mackay first saw something strange in the loch, a group of monster buffs will head out on to the water to raise a glass of whisky to the woman whose sighting sparked a phenomenon that continues to captivate the world.

Adrian Shine, leader of the Loch Ness Research Project and designer of the five-star Loch Ness Exhibition in Drumnadrochit, will lead the excursion, which also includes Edinburgh Fortean Society president Gordon Rutter, Loch Ness investigator Dick Raynor and a number of other noted Loch Ness specialists.

A single malt, “Superstition”, has been specially selected to mark the occasion, along with a blend of port and brandy named “Conviction”. Members of the boat party will also enjoy a slice of “Nessie at 80” birthday cake designed and made by Drumnadrochits own Cobbs Bakery.

Although Nessie herself has not yet confirmed her attendance, she will not be left out of the party, receiving her own beer liberation poured in the loch courtesy of local, Loch Ness Brewery.

Loch Ness expert MrShine, one of VisitScotlands Meet the Scots ambassadors, said: “Even without Nessie, Loch Ness is a place of great beauty and remarkable intrigue, but the first modern sighting by Mrs Mackay was a key date in history, not only for Loch Ness, but for Scotland as a whole.”

Malcolm Roughhead, chief executive of VisitScotland said: “It would be difficult to overstate the importance of Mrs Mackays sighting of the Loch Ness Monster to tourism in Scotland. There are few places in the world where people havent heard of the phenomenon and the 80th anniversary is sure to spark renewed interest and encourage even more visitors to come here and see if they can spot Nessie for themselves.”

Graeme Ambrose, executive director at Destination Loch Ness, said: “Clearly Mrs MacKays sighting has had a huge impact on the worldwide perception and tourism potential of Loch Ness. The icing on the cake is that there is even more to this fascinating area beyond the monster, and we know that visitors to Loch Ness are intrigued, inspired and impressed by what they do see.”

Meanwhile, today there will also be a gathering at The Loch Ness Centre and Exhibition in Drumnadrochit. The reception will include local experts and will meet in Mrs Mackays old dining room (now The Loch Ness Exhibition foyer).Mr Shine will welcome everyone and Mrs Mackay will make an appearance by way of her filmed interview from some 20 years.” - Jenna Conti highland-news.co.uk

Other Reports

The BBC asks……

Loch Ness Monster: Is Nessie just a tourist conspiracy?

BBC

The Goodies riding Nessie

Related Stories

It is 80 years since hotel manageress Mrs Aldie Mackay first reported seeing a “whale-like fish” in the waters of Loch Ness.

Now an academic at St Andrew’s University is trawling through 1,000 eye-witness accounts since to see what they can tell us.

He wryly notes more than a few hotel proprietors among typical spotters. So is “Nessie” just a conspiracy to boost tourism?

It was 14 April 1933 and Mrs Mackay, manageress of the Drumnadrochit Hotel, was driving with her husband along the road to Inverness.

As they drove, she glanced out across the still calm waters of Loch Ness towards Aldourie Castle. There, in the water, she saw something.

Mrs Aldie Mackay Mrs Aldie Mackay, manageress of the Drumnadrochit Hotel, said she saw a “beast” in the loch on 14 April, 1933

In a rare interview years later, she described the moment to marine biologist and founder of The Loch Ness Project, Adrian Shine.

“She said it was black, wet, with the water rolling off it,” he says.

“It went in a circle, round and down. She yelled at her husband “Stop! The beast!”

It is an interesting remark, Mr Shine says.

Start Quote

I suppose it is possible that people have an agenda. But I stress that I believe the vast majority of people are reporting the truth

Dr Charles Paxton University of St Andrew’s

Mrs Mackay’s sighting was reported in the Inverness Courier on 2 May 1933 by Alex Campbell, the water bailiff for Loch Ness and a part-time journalist.

It is widely regarded as the first “modern sighting” of a monster in the loch.

“But the fact that she said “the beast”… It’s as though she knew there was something strange in the loch,” Mr Shine says.

Local legend

There was already one account of a monster in the area dating back to the Middle Ages.

According to Adamnan’s account of the life of Saint Columba, believed to have been written in the 7th century, the Irish monk saw a “water beast” in the River Ness.

But Mrs Mackay’s sighting opened the floodgates.

Police inspectors, bank managers, students, town clerks, lorry drivers, clergymen, forestry workers, office workers, water bailiffs and fishermen were all among the people who claimed to have seen the monster.

Adrian Shine Marine biologist Adrian Shine says he has made a living out of being a sceptical Loch Ness investigator

Tourists and ‘Nessie hunters’ flocked to the area. There were traffic jams around the loch.

There were even a few celebrity spotters such as authors Gavin Maxwell and Sir Compton Mackenzie.

Dr Charles Paxton, a research fellow and statistical ecologist at St Andrew’s University, has so far sifted through 800 of the 1,000 recorded sightings.

And, he adds, a sizeable number came from cafe and hotel proprietors, including Mrs Mackay herself.

Certainly there was much to be gained from the legend.

According to Visit Scotland, Nessie tourism brings in more than Ł1m to the area per year.

Loch Ness facts and figures

  • Loch Ness holds by far the greatest volume of water of any loch in Scotland – measured at 263,162 million cubic feet
  • The maximum depth recorded is around 230m – twice the height of St Paul’s Cathedral
  • Loch Ness is the second longest loch in Scotland at 24.24 miles

So was Mrs Mackay motivated by cynical thoughts of her bank balance?

Mr Shine believes not.

“She was far from a self-publicist. It was her husband who told the water bailiff, and she stayed anonymous in the newspaper report.

“She didn’t say anything for two reasons. Firstly, because she thought she would be seen as self-advertising.

“But also because they used to say for people who had seen something in the loch “take more water with it”… suggesting they were drunks.”

But there are plenty of people who have made a living from Nessie, including Mr Shine himself, who now runs the Loch Ness Centre and Exhibition out of Mrs Mackay’s old hotel.

Fame and fortune

“I don’t conceal that I first came seeking fame and fortune, that there was a wildlife mystery and I was the one to solve it,” he says.

“I have become more sceptical over the years, but oddly enough I have made a living out of being a fairly sceptical investigator.

“But I do believe the vast majority of witnesses are sincere…and not drunk,” he adds.

Fake photo British surgeon Colonel Robert Wilson claimed he took this photograph on 19 April 1934

What does Dr Paxton – who is using the Loch Ness phenomenon to analyse how science handles anecdotal and low frequency data – think?

He has trawled through old newspaper clippings, reports, books and records from the Loch Ness Investigation Bureau of the 1960s and 1970s, for all recorded sightings that peaked especially after the infamous ‘surgeon’s photograph’ of 1934.

Highly respected British surgeon, Colonel Robert Wilson, claimed he took his photograph on 19 April 1934, while driving along the northern shore of Loch Ness. It was later revealed to be a toy submarine outfitted with a sea-serpent head.

“I suppose it is possible that people have an agenda,” Dr Paxton says.

“But I stress that I believe the vast majority of people are reporting the truth. They believe they have seen something strange.

“Now there might be a lot of people who are mistaken, but I think they are sincere.”

In fact, Dr Paxton says, analysing the eye-witness accounts may tell us more about ourselves than whether or not the Loch Ness monster exists. He is due to publish the results of his study later this year.

Drumnadrochit Hotel The Drumnadrochit Hotel, which is now the Loch Ness Centre

“I am carrying out a statistical analysis of Loch Ness monster accounts since 1933, specifically looking for clusters in terms of what is reported,” he says.

“In some cases there are multiple witnesses, or witnesses giving multiple accounts of the same event, which allow us to test eyewitness consistency.

“These cases are very interesting because they allow us to consider whether certain witnesses have a tendency to see Nessie more than might be expected by chance alone.”

He could have chosen another unexplained phenomenon to analyse – ghost sightings or Big Foot, for example – but as a former aquatic biologist, Nessie appealed to him.

On Sunday, a boat will set sail onto the still calm waters of Loch Ness.

Onboard will be Dr Paxton, Mr Shine, and a number of other ‘monster hunters’, Loch Ness experts, and Visit Scotland representatives.

They may not agree when it comes to Nessie, but there on the loch they will raise a glass of whisky to Mrs Mackay and 80 years of the legend of Loch Ness.

More on This Story

Related Stories

Related Internet links

The Beast of Loch Ness – PBS (1998)

Published on 16 Mar 2012

Is it just a fairy tale, or could a primeval beast lurk in the deep, dark waters of a Scottish lake?

Since it was first reported more than 60 years ago, hundreds claim to have witnessed the Loch Ness Monster, while one scientist after another has brought the latest technology to the loch to probe the phenomenon.

Twenty-five years after their first, groundbreaking expedition to Loch Ness, NOVA joins two American scientists as they return to Scotland for one last go at Nessie.

During a three-week expedition, they use state-of-the-art sonar and sensitive underwater cameras in an attempt to track down and identify the elusive beast. Biologists study the ecosystem of the loch to determine if it could support a large animal. Geologists study its history, looking for clues about what kind of creature might have colonized it, and when.

NOVA examines the photographic evidence in the case. And eyewitnesses vividly recount their sightings. Could this legendary creature be real, perhaps a relic from the time of dinosaurs? Or is it a shared illusiona product of myth, mirage and wishful thinking?
Original broadcast date: 01/12/99
Topic: animal biology/behavior, unexplained phenomena

(Video credit: documentarynetwork)

Scotland gets new permanent RNLI lifeboat station at Leverburgh in the Hebrides – 110413 1540z

The RNLIs lifeboat station in Leverburgh in the Hebrides is to become permanent following a successful trial, the charity announces today. (Thurs 11 April)

Leverburgh lifeboat (Photo credit: RNLI/Richard Smith)

Leverburgh lifeboat
(Photo credit: RNLI/Richard Smith)

The charitys trustees have given the go-ahead for the station at Leverburgh in the Hebrides to become Scotlands 46th station. This is the newest all-weather station in Scotland for more than 20 years.

The decision was taken after the lifeboat attended 16 incidents in less than a year, making it one of the busier boats in Scotland, and the dedication of the small community to train as the volunteer crew. The RNLI had estimated between five to 10 shouts annually at Leverburgh.

John MacLean, Leverburghs Lifeboat Operations Manager, says today, From an operational point of view, it is satisfying to know that Leverburgh has been granted permanent status. The central position in the islands, with access to east and west, made it an ideal location.

The number of “shouts” has been at least up to national average, crew numbers have been maintained in a sparsely populated area, and dedication shown by them for the RNLI cause has been outstanding. It is gratifying to know that the enthusiasm shown and the time dedicated from the start has now been rewarded.

The station was launched last May to fill a gap in the coastal cover provided by the charity. The nearest stations are at Stornoway, Portree and Barra and they had covered the Sound of Harris area where Leverburgh is situated.

In recent years the RNLI had received representations from the South Harris Community Council for a lifeboat. The growth of offshore fish farms and renewable energy projects, and an increase in leisure craft prompted the call for a new station.
Local fishing boats had been used to resolving mechanical problems amongst themselves, due to the distance from the RNLIs stations.
A trial station was established on 11 May and by the end of 2012 the volunteers had been called out on 13 occasions.

Leverburghs shouts have been varied. They include helping fishing boats, rescuing a family from an island, searching for a missing canoeist, being on standby when a young Minke whale was in the village harbour, rescuing a sheep stuck on a ledge, and being on standby when a body was found at the bottom of cliffs.
The average length of a service has been about 3.5 hours, with the longest taking up to nine hours. There are currently 17 enrolled crew, including one woman and a part-time mechanic. Training has included courses at the RNLIs Lifeboat College in Poole, visits to Leverburgh from other coxswains and mechanics, and trips to flank stations.

Neil Campbell, chairman of Leverburgh Lifeboat Management Group, says, The news of confirmation of a permanent RNLI station for Leverburgh will be warmly welcomed and a fitting reward for the dedication to training by the coxswains and crew.
Support for the Leverburgh lifeboat has been overwhelming , a sum approaching £30,000 has now been raised for the RNLI over the year since the lifeboat went on station in May 2012 by the local Branch with support from the wider community including the whole of Harris, Berneray and the Northern half of the Uists.

The lifeboat station is operated from a portable building and the RNLI has no immediate plans to replace this structure.

Hamish Taylor, honorary president at Leverburgh, says, In initially building our case for the establishment of a lifeboat at Leverburgh, we were very much aware that the successful operation of all stations depends very much on the support and goodwill of host communities. From the very beginning, the communities of Harris, Berneray and the northern half of the Uists have been supremely supportive of Leverburgh Lifeboat Station and this has had positive benefits not only for the successful operation of the station but also in connecting the communities more closely together in this common purpose.

As a wholly donation-dependent charity, the RNLI is wholly dependent on contributions from the public, and yet again the communities served by Leverburgh Lifeboat Station have in this first year of operation demonstrated that despite being one of the most economically challenged areas in the United Kingdom, they are also among the most generous.

Leverburgh has a Mersey class lifeboat, The Royal Thames. The RNLI is going to replace the Mersey class lifeboats with the new Shannon class and therefore Leverburgh may in due course receive a Shannon boat. It costs on average £4,100 a week to operate an RNLI all-weather lifeboat station.

3 May 2012

Tobermory lifeboat meets the Leverburgh lifeboat on passage to her new station on the Isle of Harris. The Leverburgh lifeboat carries out a towing exercise before being welcomed by the sound of bagpipes into Tobermory Bay.

Leverburgh’s lifeboat, ‘Lifetime Care’, arrived at the brand new trial lifeboat station on Wednesday 2 May

(Video credit: RNLI)

Video below: A compilation of rescue footage taken on board Scottish RNLI lifeboats throughout 2012 – featuring footage from Largs, Aberdeen, Anstruther, Tobermory, Kinghorn, Broughty Ferry, Loch Ness, Lerwick, Thurso, Stornoway, Lochinver, Peterhead, Leverburgh, Barra, Stromness, Longhope, Dunbar and Helensburgh.

(Video credit: RNLI)

Scotland: Two climbers rescued after becoming lost in poor weather conditions – 110413 1340z

Tayside MRT pictured here in Southern Cairngorms on 29 January 2012 (Photo: Tayside MRT)

“Two climbers have been rescued after becoming lost in poor weather conditions.

 

Police and mountain rescue teams were called to the Glen Doll area, north of Kirriemuir in the Angus Glens, at about 9pm on Wednesday.

 

A spokesman for Police Scotland said the pair had got into trouble after losing their way in “appalling” weather conditions.

 

He added that the men were experienced climbers and were found safe and well in the early hours of the morning.” – STV

Tayside Mountain Rescue Team:

“Some of the Team are just getting to bed after another successful rescue this evening/morning. A Full Team call out was initiated at about 10pm on Wednesday night for 2 missing persons in the Corrie Fee area of Glen Doll. Due to the weather conditions, Rescue 137 was not able to fly. The 2 casualties were located at 3.15am, very cold but unhurt, and were able to be walked off the Mountain by Team Members.
It’s still winter conditions out there, so please be careful whatever you are doing in the Mountains.”

 

(Photo: thecourier.co.uk)

RNLI For those in peril on the sea: Salcombe lifeboat veterans recall the day when they launched to aid divers in distress in horrendous conditions…100413 1730z

For those in peril on the sea….

The former Salcombe RNLI lifeboat The Baltic Exchange that capsized (Photo: RNLI)

The former Salcombe RNLI lifeboat The Baltic Exchange that capsized (Photo: RNLI)

THIRTY years ago today, the crew of the Salcombe RNLI all-weather lifeboat launched to assist divers in trouble

Little did they know that the day would take a dramatic turn with a crew volunteer going overboard and the Watson class lifeboat capsizing in enormous seas.

Former crew volunteer Roger Evans

Frank Smith

 Former crew volunteer Mike Hicks
Former crew volunteer David Lamble

All pictures RNLI/Nathan Williams

No-one lost their life despite the incident and last weekend the four crew who are still alive today, met for a special reunion at the charitys RNLI College in Poole, Dorset.

The Salcombe RNLI crew were called around lunchtime on 10 April 1983 to assist a group of divers who were reported to be in difficulties their inflatable dinghy had capsized on the Skerries Bank.

As the lifeboat left the harbour it became apparent to the seven lifeboat crew that the conditions were horrendous with ferocious force nine winds and big seas.

Among those who put to sea were Frank Smith, now 66 and at the time the Motor Mechanic at Salcombe lifeboat station and crew volunteers Mike Hicks, also 66, and then a local restaurateur, Roger Evans, 70 now and then an Audiologist and David Whale Lamble, the youngest crew member at the time aged just 24 and a fisherman.

 

The seas had built alarmingly on the day and in the midst of the passage Mike Hicks was washed overboard by a huge wave. Frank Smith takes up the story from his perspective;

 

As we turned to go back for Mike the lifeboat started to roll over to starboard. She just had the momentum to carry on. I thought to myself, I dont like this and then I thought shes going. I remember it all going black and then we were upside down and trapped below, everything was the wrong way round. I remember it went very still and I hadnt a clue where we were. Then I saw a clump of light the size of my fist on the door and that was her coming back up again.

 

When she was back up we turned round to collect Mike out of the water and that meant turning in to the very weather that had just capsized us.

 

For Mike Hicks it was a very different story as he recalls with emotion:

 

I unhooked my safety line to let someone go by and as I did that a wall of water appeared and I was gone. Then I was going down into the water and I could see two cameos of my sons and I thought what are you doing down here, lets go up. As I hit the surface I noticed my watch was undone. I fastened it and looked over and thats when I saw the lifeboat upside down and with the propellers still turning. I felt terrible emotion because all my mates were possibly lost. Then I saw the lifeboat come back over.

 

I was looking up at walls of water and then I saw the lifeboat coming towards me, but it got picked up on a wave and then it crashed down in to a trough. Theres a scramble net on the starboard side so on the next run they dropped it down and I came up on a wave and grabbed it and then my crew colleagues managed to pull me onboard.

 

David Whale Lamble who was the youngest crew volunteer that day, says their RNLI training paid off, it was they all agree a text book capsize, but he wouldnt want to experience it again;

 

People often ask me what it was like. I say it was a good experience but one that you would never wish on anyone else or yourself for that matter.

 

There were four divers in trouble that day. Two managed to get safely ashore in an inflatable dinghy, while the other two were airlifted from the sea by a search and rescue helicopter crew.

 

Following the incident a Framed Letter of Thanks signed by the then RNLI Chairman the Duke of Atholl was awarded to the Coxswain and crew in recognition of their fortitude and determination in the highest traditions of the Institution. The Salcombe RNLI team included Coxswain Graham Griffiths, Brian Horse Cater, Frank Smith, Stan Turns, Roger Evans, Mike Hicks and David Whale Lamble.

 

As designed, the emergency air bag fitted to the 47 foot Watson, had inflated as the lifeboat heeled over beyond the point of no return and initiated her righting. The Baltic Exchange suffered minimal damage but was taken off service for a complete survey and refit following the capsize. Frank Smith recalls that when he took her on trials after the overhaul he found signs attached to most bits of equipment reading this way up.

 

Frank Smith is retired and lives in Salcombe, David Lamble lives near Plymouth and is still a fisherman; Mike Hicks now lives in Brittany and Roger Evans in Scotland.” – http://www.thisissouthdevon.co.uk

Related:

It is 190 years since Sir William Hillary asked the nation to lend our utmost aid to those in trouble at sea.

It was an impassioned appeal to the nation, calling for a service dedicated to saving lives at sea, that ultimately led to the formation of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution.

Help those in peril on the sea: RNLI founder’s call still resonates

What drives postmen, engineers and teachers to put their own lives at risk to save those in peril on the sea?

RNLI: What drives these volunteers to put their own lives at risk?

An account of the incredible history of Irish lifeboats, and the even more incredible men and women who are respond in the case of disaster.

For Those In Peril on the Sea

 

Lifeboats

Key facts about the RNLI

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution is the charity that saves lives at sea. Our volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland from 236 lifeboat stations, including four along the River Thames and inland lifeboat stations at Loch Ness, Lough Derg, Enniskillen and Lough Ree. Additionally the RNLI has more than 1,000 lifeguards on over 180 beaches around the UK and operates a specialist flood rescue team, which can respond anywhere across the UK and Ireland when inland flooding puts lives at risk.

The RNLI relies on public donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. As a charity it is separate from, but works alongside, government-controlled and funded coastguard services. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824 our lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved at least 140,000 lives. Volunteers make up 95% of the charity, including 4,600 volunteer lifeboat crew members and 3,000 volunteer shore crew. Additionally, tens of thousands of other dedicated volunteers raise funds and awareness, give safety advice, and help in our museums, shops and offices.

Learn more about the RNLI

For more information please visit the RNLI website or Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. News releases, videos and photos are available on the News Centre.

Contacting the RNLI – public enquiries

Members of the public may contact the RNLI on 0845 122 6999 or by email.

The RNLI is a charity registered in England and Wales (209603) and Scotland (SC037736). Charity number CHY 2678 in the Republic of Ireland

UK: Coastguard warns of spring tide danger after at least 15 trapped. Rescues by lifeboat and helicopter – 010413 2230z

The rescue operation at Zacry’s Island, Newquay, on Saturday evening. Credit: Newquay RNLI

Nine people, including a three-year-old boy, were rescued by a lifeboat crew after becoming trapped on an island.

Queensferry RNLI volunteer lifeboat crew were called out Sunday after the group became trapped by the incoming tide at Cramond Island.

The Queensferry was launched at 3.20pm and arrived at Cramond Island six minutes later.

RNLI crew members took the group board the lifeboat and landed safely at Cramond harbour. No one was injured.

A RNLI spokesman said: “If anyone finds themselves trapped on Cramond Island by the incoming tide, dial 999 and ask for the coastguard.

“The coastguard will alert the lifeboat. Never attempt to wade or swim ashore. We advise to check the tide tables for safe crossing times before attempting to cross to Cramond Island.”“- stv.tv

Meanwhile,

Falmouth Coastguard is warning people to beware of fast, incoming tides after six people were trapped in two incidents in Cornwall on Saturday night (30 March).
Falmouth Coastguard has issued this statement:
We have spring tides at the moment that come in faster and further than usual. For this reason people out and about enjoying the Cornish coastline need to be especially careful to plan their trip.    Always check the weather and tide timetable before you set out on your walk and wear appropriate clothing for the unseasonably cold weather. If you do get cut off call 999 Coastguard.– Coastguard Watch Officer Richard Williams

BBC Weather : Tide Tables

Tide Times (from tidetimes.org.uk)

 

Scotland: Body of missing skier Daniel Maddox found after avalanche in Glencoe – 310313 1630z

Update 31 Mar 2013 160z:

Lochaber mountain rescue team have found the body of Daniel Maddox, 41 yrs old from Clackmannanshire in the search for a skier missing after avalanche yesterday near Glencoe

(Photo: Sky News)

A rescue operation has resumed on Sunday near Glencoe Ski Centre following an avalanche, but searchers say there is little chance a missing skier has survived.

One off-piste skier is feared buried in the avalanche and mountain rescue teams have so far been unable to find him.

Emergency services were alerted to the avalanche close to the Glencoe Ski Centre just after 1pm on Saturday.

Staff from the ski centre helped mountain rescue teams in the search in an off-piste skiing area in the Etive Glades, Glencoe Mountain Rescue Team said.

RAF Lossiemouth and Lochaber Mountain Rescue Team were also involved.

Glencoe Mountain Resort posted on its Facebook page: (We) regret to say that an experienced off-piste skier skiing out of the ski area was caught in a major avalanche this afternoon.

Four people killed in Glencoe Avalanche
The avalanche is the second serious incident at Glencoe this year

Off-piste skiing, also referred to as back country skiing, involves the use of unofficial slopes which are not patrolled or maintained.

A forecast on the sportscotland Avalanche Information Service website on Saturday placed Glencoe at considerable risk of an avalanche.

The snowpack is moderately to poorly bonded on many steep slopes, it said.

Triggering is possible, even from low additional loads, particularly on the indicated steep slopes. In some cases medium-sized, in isolated cases large-sized, natural avalanches are possible.

Rescuers said the snow is up to 40 feet deep and has hampered search efforts and admitted it was unlikely the man could have survived.

John Grieve, leader of Glencoe Mountain Team, said the avalanche travelled around 1,000ft down the rocky face of the slope.

He said: The avalanche has actually gone into a gully, and in some places the snow is about 40ft deep.

Glencoe map in Scotland
Some 30 people are involved in the search in an off-piste area of Glencoe

Its not like a normal ski slope where it is mainly smooth and straight. There are a lot of rocks around and it is more dangerous.

Mark Fulton, 25, from Gourock, Inverclyde, who was skiing all day with his family on the slopes at the Glencoe Ski Centre, said he saw the rescue mission unfolding.

I was up there from about 10am and at lunchtime we went in to get something to eat at the cafe and we saw an emergency helicopter hovering about, he said.

It looked as though it was coming in to land near the bottom of the hill. When we were leaving later I saw police and mountain rescue vans all gathered as well.

I didnt actually know there had been an avalanche until I was driving home and heard it on the radio.

Its just not something you think about when youre going out skiing, you never think something like that will happen to you its like when you get on a plane, you dont think its going to crash.

I just hope the person is found safe and well.

Glencoe Ski area, also known as Glencoe Mountain or the White Corries ski centre, is the oldest ski area in Scotland.

In January, four people died while descending the 3,658ft Bidean Nam Bian near Glencoe. An avalanche struck without warning and swept them 1,000ft down the mountainside.

In the same month, 22-year-old Ben St Joseph, from Essex, died after falling 100 metres from Tower Ridge on Ben Nevis.

In February, three men survived falling 150 metres (450ft) in an avalanche in the Coire an t-Sneachda area of the Cairngorm mountain range.

Lochaber MRT (on Facebook 13hrs ago): Lochaber MRT have been assisting Glencoe MRT in the search for a avalanched skier. Team members were flown in from Fort William team base to the scene by R137. Despite hours of digging and probing in a confined area, avalanche depth in excess of 6mtrs deep, the skier was not found. The search continues tomorrow. LMRT

Rescuers resume search for skier after avalanche in Glencoe

BBC NEWS 31 March 2013 Last updated at 10:31

(Photo: glencoemountainrescue.org.uk) Glencoe Mountain Rescue

The search for a skier missing after an avalanche near Glencoe Ski Centre in the west Highlands has resumed.

Emergency services were alerted to the incident at an off-piste skiing area in the Etive Glades on Saturday.

(Photo: ibtimes.com)

Glencoe Mountain Resort said an experienced off-piste skier had been caught in the major avalanche.

Northern Constabulary is co-ordinating the search, with members of Glencoe and Lochaber rescue teams.

Continue reading the main story

The avalanche has actually gone into a gully, and in some places the snow is about 40ft deep

John Grieve Mountain rescue leader

The search, which had been called off as darkness fell on Saturday, included an RAF Lossiemouth helicopter.

John Grieve, leader of Glencoe Mountain Team, said the avalanche travelled about 1,000ft down the slopes rocky face.

The avalanche has actually gone into a gully, and in some places the snow is about 40ft deep, he said.

He added that it was unlikely the skiier had survived in those circumstances.

There have been a number of serious incidents as a result of avalanches in Scotland this year.

In January four experienced climbers died on Bidean Nam Bianin Glencoe.

Three people also died after an avalanche in the Cairngorms in February.

Two of the climbers were off-duty members of the RAF Mountaineering Association. The third fatality was a student on a course at the Glenmore Lodge outdoor centre.

In the same week there was a second fatal avalanche involving a hillwalker.

========================================================

About 30 people from Glencoe and Lochaber mountain rescue teams, SARDA, police, the mountain resorts ski patrol and a helicopter from RAF Lossiemouth all helped with the operation in the Etive Glades.

Related:

Missing Skier in Avalanche in Glencoe heavywhalley

Update 31 Mar 2013 160z: Lochaber mountain rescue team have found the body of Daniel Maddox, 41 yrs old from Clackmannanshire in the search for a skier missing after avalanche yesterday near Glencoe

Avalanche Information for the Scottish Mountains (SAIS)

Avalanche Information Service publish the daily forecasts of the avalanche, snow, and mountain conditions at the 5 most popular areas of Scotland during the season.

Report an avalanche now

Scotland: Search of Knoydart area, where police found missing journalist Clive Dennier’s car – 310313 0000z

(Updates at bottom of page)

Inverness Police wish to renew their appeal for information and assistance from the public in relation to missing man Clive Dennier, 50.

Inverness Police renew appeal for missing journalist, Clive Dennier

Inverness Police renew appeal for missing journalist, Clive Dennier

Since Mr Dennier was reported missing after failing to arrive for work in Grantown On Spey on the morning of Monday 25 March 2013 members of the public have continued to call in to assist with information to help the police enquiry. Despite this and extensive police investigation, there is still no indication of the whereabouts of Mr Dennier or his car.

Chief Inspector Graeme Murdoch, Inverness Area Commander said: We are really anxious for Clives safety. Everything we know tells us that his disappearance is unexplained and totally out of character. Officers around the Highlands are actively involved in the search for Clive and we now have an enquiry team dedicated to the investigation.

We are extremely grateful for the ongoing assistance and interest, both from the public and from Clives colleagues in the media. Finding Clives car would be a real breakthrough and we would ask everyone out there to help us by looking out for it.

Have you seen this car?SX54 CXD

Have you seen this car?
SX54 CXD

Mr Dennier is believed to be in possession of a silver Volkswagen Polo motor car registration number SX54 CXD. The car is missing its wheel trims.

Any person with information, however insignificant it may seem, should contact the police by calling 101.

Police trace car in search for missing man Clive Dennier.

Fri, 29 Mar 2013 13:13:0 GMT
Police can now confirm that following extensive searches across the Highlands for missing man Clive Dennier, his car was located this morning in the Knoydart area west of Invergarry. The car was found by police as part our coordinated search strategy.As a result of this development, organised searches of the area have now commenced. At this time two mountain rescue teams, police search dogs are deployed to the search.

Mr Denniers family have been updated. This remains a very anxious time for them and they ask that their privacy is respected.

Source:
Lomond Mountain Rescue Team

Update 30 Mar 2013 2355z:

Search continues for missing man Clive Dennier

Sat, 30 Mar 2013 23:37:0 GMT

An extensive search continues for missing man Clive Dennier. Following the discovery of his car in the Kinlochourn area on Friday 29th March searching has been foccused on Friday and Saturday around Knoydart Peninsula, Kinlochourn, Barrisdale and Glen Quoich.
The search is being coordinated by Northern Constabulary with searches being carried out by Glenelg, Kintail and Royal Air Force mountain rescue teams, Coastguard and Police dog units. Skywatch have provided assistance with aerial searching.
This is an understandably anxious time for Mr Dennier’s family and they request that their privacy be respected.

Police search for Glasgow special needs school vandals

Caledonian Chronicle

By Lesley Roy

POLICE are searching for the cruel vandals who set fire to a Glasgow special needs school.

Six firefighters were called out to  Hollybrook Academy, in the Govanhill area of the city, at 10.30pm on Saturday night to tackle blazes in several areas of the two-storey building.

The school was closed Monday 25 and Tuesday 26 March to its 140 S1-S6 pupils, to allow council officers to assess the damage and for Strathclyde police and fire departments to conduct their investigations.

A Glasgow City Council spokesman said: “It’s despicable that vandals would set fire to any school.

“But this is particularly cruel as Hollybrook is a school for vulnerable young people with additional support for learning needs and they will now lose two valuable days of their education as a result.

“We would urge anyone who knows anything about this incident to contact the police.

“In the meantime…

View original post 29 more words

Death plunge: SAR crew may have mistakenly severed rope as they winched injured climber – claims widow – 280213 1920z

Police to probe claim that rescue helicopter crew accidentally cut rope sending climber plunging to his death

28 Feb 2013 09:00 Daily Record

(Photo: dailyrecord.co.uk) Mark Phillips died after sustaining fatal injuries whilst climbing Ben Nevis.

 

“WITNESSES say the search and rescue crew may have mistakenly severed a rope as they winched injured Mark Phillips aboard.

CLAIMS a rescue helicopter crew mistakenly severed a rope and sent a climber tumbling to his death were being probed by police last night.

Yesterday, 51-year-old Mark Phillipss widow Caroline told the Record: I want the truth and Mark deserves the truth.

Mark was climbing with a friend on the north face of Ben Nevis when he fell 160ft in the Raeburns Buttress area on Monday.

His fall was broken by the safety rope he was attached to and he was left lying on a steep slope.

Mark had suffered massive head injuries but was still alive when an operation began to winch him on board an RAF Lossiemouth search-and-rescue chopper.

Its understood that in the operation to winch him on board, the climbers rope was cut before he was secured to the lifting device.

Tragically, Mark then fell hundreds of feet.

His body was later recovered by a second rescue helicopter from HMS Gannet at Prestwick.

Lochaber Mountain Rescue Team leader John Stevenson said: This lad must have fallen 160ft at least. It was a bad fall. We think he was the lead climber because his mate was on the rope.

He saw him fall as did two other climbers in the area and he abseiled down and raised the alarm.

Accidents happen. The lad was almost at the summit and he put his axe into soft snow and fell. He was unlucky.

John Allen, a former leader of the Cairngorm Mountain Rescue Team, said that the safety rope may have been damaged in the first fall.

He said: It could already have been half-sawn through. If its been damaged, theres no way the winchman or rescue team would have been aware of that. Last night, former RAF Mountain Rescue Team leader Dave Whalley
insisted that the death was a terrible accident.

He said: These crews are incredible. It is a tragedy if it has been an accident but these guys are saving so many lives every day.

Caroline, 51, who lived with her environmental health officer husband and their son Ruaraidh in Spean Bridge, five miles north of Ben Nevis, said: We dont know thats the thing.

We have to wait and see.The thing is if people jump to conclusions, were not going to get the truth.

Its important to me to get to the bottom of it because everyones done the best
they could.

Police confirmed they were investigating Marks death.

He is the 11th person to die in the Scottish hills this winter.” – Daily Record

Scotland: Fisherman dies, 2 others survive after fishing vessel sank off Western Isles – 220213 1930z

Three fishermen from the Isle of Lewis were rescued from a liferaft by the Coastguard rescue helicopter based in Stornoway after their ten-metre fishing vessel Achieve sank.

“At just after 3pm today Stornoway Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre heard a spoken Mayday call asking for urgent assistance. Because no location was given Stornoway Coastguard calculated the likely location of the fishing vessel by triangulating the strength of the radio signal through their cluster of radio aerials and checked with local ports and harbours for a vessel of the same name.

Falmouth Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre reported that a distress alert had been received from a RNLI Man Overboard Beacon and so the Leverburgh RNLI Lifeboat was asked to go to this position along with the Coastguard rescue helicopter based at Stornoway. When the helicopter arrived on scene they saw a red flare launched by the liferaft.

 

All three crew members were winched from the liferaft in to the helicopter and taken to hospital for medical attention. The liferaft was recovered by the lifeboat who also checked the scene for debris and pollution.

 

Ed Thompson Stornoway Coastguard Watch Manager said:
It would appear that the fishermens vessel sank very quickly, and although they were unable to give us their position during their Mayday call for help they had flares in the liferaft and so were able to quickly attract the attention of the helicopter when it arrived on scene.” – MCA
Press Reports

Fisherman dies in hospital after his boat sank off Western Isles

Dailyrecord.co.uk 22 Feb 2013 11:52

STORNOWAY Coastguard managed to locate and airlift the fisherman and his two colleagues from a liferaft after their boat sank on Thursday afternoon.

Coastguard helicopter
Coastguard helicopter

A FISHERMAN has died after he and two crewmates were rescued from a liferaft after their boat sank.

The three crew were rescued from waters west of Harris after the emergency services were alerted at 3pm on Thursday.

The men, from Lewis, raised a Mayday call requesting urgent assistance after their 10m fishing vessel Achieve got into trouble.

No location was given but the Stornoway Coastguard were able to calculate a likely position of the boat by triangulating radio signals and checking with local ports and harbours for a vessel of the same name.

A distress alert had been received from an RNLI “Man Overboard Beacon” by Falmouth maritime rescue co-ordination centre and the Leverburgh RNLI lifeboat was sent to that location along with the Coastguard rescue helicopter based at Stornoway.

A red flare was launched from the liferaft at the scene when the helicopter arrived.

The three fishermen were winched from the liferaft to the helicopter and taken to the Western Isles hospital for treatment.

Stornoway coastguard watch manager Ed Thompson said: “It would appear that the fishermen’s vessel sank very quickly and although they were unable to give us their position during their Mayday call for help, they had flares in the liferaft and so were able to quickly attract the attention of the helicopter when it arrived on scene.”

A spokesman for Northern Constabulary said: “Leverburgh RNLI lifeboat and the Coastguard rescue helicopter, based at Stornoway, attended the scene, and all three crew members who had been in the water were winched from a liferaft to the helicopter and were taken to Western Isles hospital for treatment.

“Two men were discharged from hospital. The third man later died in hospital. Next of kin have been informed.”

Death of Achieve fisherman

stornowaygazette.co.uk Published on Friday 22 February 2013 10:17

A FORTY-three year old crew man from the fishing vessel Achieve tragically passed away at Western Isles Hospital late last night (Thursday, February 21st).

The fishing boat which had three crew aboard sank yesterday afternoon as Stornoway Coastguard search and rescue helicopter plucked the men from a life-raft.

It is believed that the 10m Achieve which was situated about six miles west of the Isle of Taransay in the Sound of Harris had completed hauling creels and was making way to Leverburgh in reasonable weather when tragedy struck.

Just after 3pm Stornoway Coastguard Station received a spoken Mayday call asking for urgent assistance.

Stornoway and Leverburgh RNLI lifeboats were launched and Stornoway Coastguard search and rescue helicopter took off at 3.55pm to attend the scene.

For reasons yet unknown, the vessel had began to quickly take on water and listed almost immediately.

The crew abandoned the boat by launching the vessels life-raft, although its believed that initially the life-raft was caught on the boats wheel-housing.

Two crew successfully entered and freed the raft, however the third crew member was still in the water and some distance from them. The two crew men was forced to deflate the life-rafts canopy to enable them to row to their fellow fisherman and get him on board.

All three were air-lifted by Stornoway Coastguard chopper and transferred to Western Isles Hospital for medical examination.

It is understood that the fishing vessel the Achieve sank very quickly.

The 43 year old crew man who died had entered the water wearing a life-jacket, but had been in the water for a considerable time with very low sea temperatures at this time of year.

Supporting the crew and families, Superintendent Finlay MacLeod of Stornoway Fishermens Mission, said: Once again we are reminded, if ever proof needed, that fishing is the most dangerous occupation in the UK with the tragic death of this fisherman.

On behalf of the fishing community throughout the Western Isles, and the Royal Mission Deep Sea Fishermen, I would like to express our deep sympathy to the families concerned; and also to the two surviving crewmen and to assure them of our prayers and thoughts at this distressing time.