UK (Cornwall): Holidaymaker dies after sea rescue at Newquay, 2 others in hospital – Published 15 Aug 2017 1455z (GMT/UTC)

A 27-year-old man has died after being rescued from the sea at Newquay last night [15 August 2017].

He was among a group of three males who got into difficulty after being caught in a rip tide and swept out to sea at Crantock Beach.

The HM Coastguard Search and Rescue helicopter (Rescue 924) along with two RNLI Lifeboats (@NewquayRNLI ) and the Coastguard Rescue Team from Newquay (@NewquayCRT ), police and ambulance, were sent to the incident around 7.30pm.

The three, who were holidaying in the area, were rescued from the water by two local surfers and then airlifted to Treliske Hospital by the Coastguard helicopter.

The 27-year-old man was pronounced deceased a short time later. His next of kin have been informed. The death is not being treated as suspicious and police will be carrying out enquiries on behalf of the coroner.

The other two swimmers, aged 17 and 18, remain at Treliske Hospital but are not believed to be seriously injured.

Only 5 days ago, there was a mass rescue at Crantock Beach, RNLI lifeguards had to rescue multiple body boarders from a strong current. Two lifeguards were deployed on rescue boards and performed 11 rescues and 15 assists in total. Click here for more details from RNLI

 

  • Crantock beach is patrolled by RNLI lifeguards between 10am-6pm until 1 October.
  • Wherever possible, you should swim at a lifeguarded beach. Always read and obey the safety signs, usually found at the entrance to the beach. This will help you avoid potential hazards on the beach and identify the safest areas for swimming.
  • In 2013 there were 738 RNLI lifeguard incidents involving body boarders. Between 2006 and 2011 53% of people rescued from rip currents at RNLI lifeguarded beaches were bodyboarding.

Rip current advice issued after tourist swept out to sea dies (link to video)

 

 

UK: Tynemouth lifeboat rescues world’s only engineless cargo ship, the Tres Hombres – Published 04 Jun 2017 2133z (GMT/UTC)

The world’s only Engineless Sailing Cargo Ship was towed to safety by Tynemouth RNLI lifeboat on Sunday morning (June 4th).

Tynemouth RNLI all weather lifeboat tows the Tres Hombres – the World’s only Engineless Sailing Cargo Ship – to safety at North Shields. (Image: RNLI/Adrian Don)

The lifeboat and volunteer crew members launched in response to a request for help by the skipper of the Brigantine-type sailing ship Tres Hombres.
Earlier in the morning a motor launch belonging to the 32m,128tonne sailing vessel had broken down and had been towed back to her mother ship by Cullercoats RNLI lifeboat.
The skipper of the Tres Hombres then asked for assistance in getting his vessel to a safe harbour because as she is powered only by sail and has no auxiliary engine, she relies on the now broken-down motor launch to maneuver in port. With very strong winds expected on Monday, the vessel could have been in a precarious situation so, after discussions with UK Coastguard, it was decided that the safest option for it was to tow her into the river Tyne.
Tynemouth RNLI’s all weather lifeboat was requested to launch at 10:44 and made best speed to the Tres Hombres which was anchored off Whitley Bay with Cullercoats RNLI lifeboat standing by her.
Once the lifeboat met the sailing ship the volunteer crew quickly got her under tow, while a crew member went on board to ensure the tow ropes remained secure.
The Tres Hombres and her crew of 15 were then taken to North Shields Western Quay without further incident, escorted by Cullercoats RNLI lifeboat who put two crew members ashore on the quay to assist with mooring.
Once the sailing vessel was made fast on the quay the lifeboats returned to their respective stations.
Adrian Don, the spokesman for Tynemouth RNLI lifeboat, said: ‘This is one of the most unusual services our volunteer crew members have carried out and the casualty vessel is unique as the world’s only engineless sailing cargo ship.
‘The Tres Hombres and her crew were in no immediate danger but having no engine and with her launch broken down, they had no means of safely getting into harbour and with very poor weather expected her skipper had no alternative but to ask for assistance.
‘Our volunteers were happy to help and quickly got the vessel into the shelter of the Tyne harbour’. – RNLI

bootje from De Beeldenkeuken on Vimeo.

UK (Wales): Criccieth lifeboat aids to grounded yacht on Harlech beach – Published 04 Apr 2017 1455z (GMT/UTC)

“At 10.30am, volunteer Crew Members from Criccieth’s RNLI Lifeboat Station were requested to launch following multiple reports of a yacht aground at the northern end of Harlech beach.

RNLI/Ifer Gwyn

The yacht, named Thimble and approximately 30ft in length, had gotten into difficulties near the mouth of the Porthmadog Estuary whilst attempting to navigate upriver.

Following initial calls, members of both Criccieth and Harlech HM Coastguard Teams had been deployed to assist, however with the yacht unable to refloat, it was decided to call Criccieth Lifeboat.

The Station’s Atlantic 85 Lifeboat, Doris Joan, was quickly on scene. However, the Crew were unable to attach a towline due to the ebbing tide and large waves at the foreshore. During this period, HM Coastguard had received further calls reporting a yacht in difficulty further south and requested that Barmouth RNLI launch their lifeboats. It quickly became apparent that these reports related to the same vessel; accordingly Barmouth Lifeboat’s inshore rescue boat was returned to Station whilst the all-weather Lifeboat continued towards Harlech in the hope that they could attach a rocket-line to tow the yacht. Once on-scene and following discussion with the Criccieth’s Lifeboat Crew it was decided that both vessels stood-by until high water, as the occupant was safely ashore.

After being afloat for 3 hours, the Crew of Criccieth Lifeboat were stood-down and returned to shore.” -RNLI

Do not use any information on this site for life or death decisions. All information is intended as supplementary to official sources. Kindly refer to your country’s official weather agency/government website for local warnings, advisories and bulletins.

UK: Five fishermen and two RNLI lifeboat crew were saved from the sea after a dramatic rescue off Shetland – Published 04 Mar 2017 1240z (GMT/UTC)

Five fishermen and two RNLI lifeboat crew were saved from the sea after a dramatic rescue when their trawler sank in bad weather.

(Image: RNLI)

(Image: RNLI)

The seven had to jump into the water just before the ship sank off Shetland as the sea was too rough to bring a lifeboat alongside. The alarm was raised at about 6.50am yesterday when the Lerwick-registered Ocean Way began taking on water. Lerwick RNLI lifeboat and the Coastguard search and rescue helicopter from Sumburgh both rushed to the scene. Two RNLI crew, one of whom often crews on Skerries-based Ocean Way, were transferred to the trawler with a salvage pump. But the skipper decided the trawler could not be saved. The five crew and two RNLI volunteers jumped into the water minutes before the trawler sank at 8.20am. They were picked up by the lifeboat, crewed by eight volunteers, and taken back to Lerwick. A Norwegian fish carrier, the Gerda Saele, had put a pump on board while the helicopter began winching a third pump on board, but Ocean Way’s skipper decided to abandon ship. The trawler crew were all wearing life jackets and had an Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon on board, pinpointing their position. Rescuers praised them for having the correct equipment. Lifeboat coxswain Alan Tarby said: “While the third pump was being winched on board the skipper decided to abandon ship and within minutes of him making that decision they got off and it sank, so it was a good call. “The rescue was made much easier because the Ocean Way’s crew were all wearing the correct safety equipment and had undergone safety training. “It was a good outcome even although the vessel was lost, all the crew were unharmed. The lifeboat crew performed very well, especially the two men who were in the water with the fishermen.” The fishermen were checked over by medics in Lerwick but did not need treatment. Mark Rodaway, commander for the UK Coastguard, said: “This was a difficult rescue in awful weather. In the conditions, the lifeboat had a difficult time trying to safely get alongside. “But I’m delighted to say that all five fishermen are safe and well and the fact they were all wearing life jackets ensured that they had the best chance of survival.”

RSOE March 04 2017 11:19 AM (UTC).

More here (inc video): http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-north-east-orkney-shetland-39151952

Wales: Aberystwyth Lifeboat rescues crashed paraglider from sea – Published 16 May 2016 1021Z (GMT/UTC)

At 4:15pm on Sunday (15 May) whilst returning from the rescue of an inflatable, the RNLI Arancia inshore rescue boat was tasked by the coastguard to go and assist a paraglider who was believed to have collided with the cliffs and crashed into the sea.

The paraglider was believed to have collided between Clarach and Constitution hill and crashed into the sea.

The volunteers on board the Arancia quickly headed back out to sea, whilst the stations larger RNLI Atlantic 85 lifeboat Spirit of Friendship was launched to assist in the search and rescue.

The paragliders flying partner had seen his friend disappear and quickly landed on top of the cliffs, raising the alarm by calling 999 when he could only see his friend’s paraglider in the sea.

Both lifeboats searched along the cliffs and soon spotted the casualty clinging onto the cliffs, whilst still attached to his paraglider. The canopy was filling with water in the sea and being dragged by the tide, pulling on the casualties body.

In quite a rocky area, the Arancia was able to make its way close to the casualty and took aboard the canopy allowing the casualty to remove himself from the equipment. A crewmember entered the water and carried out a first aid assessment of the casualty who had managed to land in the water and miss both the cliffs and surrounding rocks without injury but who was very cold after being in the sea.

The casualty was put into a lifejacket by the crewman who also provided protection against the waves and ensured the casualty was safe whilst the Arancia manoeuvred into position at the base of the cliffs to safely extract everyone. The casualty was transferred to the Atlantic 85, where he was given another first aid assessment and put into to equipment to keep him warm.

Both lifeboats returned to the RNLI station where the casualty was warmed up and able to get dry whilst being assessed by waiting Ambulance staff. Although cold and shaken he did not need to go to hospital and was picked up by friend who was relieved to see him safe and well. – RNLI

Credit: RNLI/Aberystwyth

Aberystwyth RNLI rescue crashed paraglider from sea

 

UK: Body of missing woman recovered by lifeboats from Filey and Flamborough – Published 180315 0915z (GMT/UTC)

The body of a woman has been recovered by RNLI volunteer crews from Filey and Flamborough in a prolonged and difficult combined operation in the early hours of Tuesday 17 March.

Shortly before 11pm on Monday 16 March, Humber Coastguard requested the launch of both Filey lifeboats to ascertain that an object spotted by a crew from Sea King helicopter Rescue 128 was indeed a missing person for whom numerous Coast Rescue Teams and Police Officers had been searching in the vicinity of the RSPB Bird Sanctuary about 4 miles south of Filey.

Filey’s Mersey class all-weather lifeboat, The Keep Fit Association, launched under the command of Coxswain/Mechanic, Barry Robson, to escort and provide some safety cover in the pitch darkness and heavy swell for Filey’s inshore lifeboat, Braund, with a crew comprising: Richard Johnson (helm), Paul Wilson and Tom Barkley.
It was necessary for a member of the inshore lifeboat crew to go ashore at high water in a heavy swell and darkness to check the condition of the casualty. This proved to be a very difficult and prolonged task and led to Flamborough’s Atlantic 85 Lifeboat, Elizabeth Jane Palmer, being asked to assist.
Eventually, the casualty was brought out to the all-weather lifeboat from where she was handed over to Flamborough inshore lifeboat to take back to South Landing, Flamborough.
Some 6 hours after the initial call-out both Filey’s lifeboats returned to the beach at Coble Landing and were recovered onto their respective carriages.
Barry Robson, Filey Lifeboat Coxswain / Mechanic said: “This incident tested both lifeboat crews as it turned out to be much more difficult and longer than expected. Both the Filey and Flamborough teams showed real professionalism dealing with the situation and for both volunteer crews their extensive training paid off. Thanks must also go to all the Coast Rescue Team members who were there.”
He added: “We are very sorry that we could do nothing for the lady and our thoughts are with the family at this time” –

John Ward
Lifeboat Press Officer at Filey Lifeboat Station.

UK: Searchers for missing trawler Z85 Morgenster in English Channel find bodies – Published 290115 1900z (GMT/UTC)

My Photo

Friday, 30 January 2015
UPDATE ON SEARCH FOR OVERDUE FISHING VESSEL
The Search and Rescue operation looking for the missing fishing vessel which had been fishing in the Dover Strait is being co-ordinated by the French coast guard as it is now in their territorial waters.

Dover Coastguard was initially alerted to the missing vessel on the afternoon of 28th January.

The search is now concentrated on an area four miles from the French coast. Any further involvement of the UK authorities will be at the request of the French coast guard.

Thursday, 29 January 2015
UPDATE ON SEARCH FOR OVERDUE FISHING VESSEL
The search continues this morning for a missing fishing vessel which had been fishing in the Dover Strait.
Dover Coastguard was alerted to the disappearance yesterday afternoon. Four crew were known to be onboard.
An RAF helicopter is searching the area along with a French maritime aircraft. Two all-weather lifeboats from Dungeness and Dover are on the scene.
A number of Belgian and Dutch fishing vessels remain on the scene in the area, looking out for any sign of their missing colleagues.
The weather conditions on scene remain challenging.

End

LifeboatsDungeness and Dover RNLI lifeboats search for missing Belgian fishing trawler

The volunteer lifeboat crews of two Kent RNLI lifeboat stations launched yesterday evening (Wednesday 28 January) to help search for a Belgian fishing trawler in the English Channel.

Dungeness all-weather lifeboat launched at 5.08pm after being tasked by Solent Coastguard to search for the 40m vessel which lost all communication earlier the same day at 1.30pm.

The Belgian-registered trawler, carrying a crew of four people, was situated 10 miles south of Dungeness when all contact was lost.

Hours after the Dungeness RNLI crew launched, Dover Coastguard requested the launch of Dover RNLI lifeboat to assist in the search. The crew launched their all-weather lifeboat just after 7pm.

Also involved in the search were coastguard helicopters Rescue 104 and Rescue 125. It is also understood several other fishing trawlers were assisting with the search.

Chris Ubee, Lifeboat Operations Manager at Dungeness RNLI, said the weather and sea conditions for his crew of five volunteers were challenging at first, but later subsided. He said: ‘In the afternoon there was some strong gusting winds and the sea was very lumpy. That did later calm slightly and by 10pm the crew were searching beneath clear skies, with a moderate breeze and moderate to rough seas.’

However, for the Dover lifeboat crew conditions were set to worsen through the night, with a warning of severe gales expected after 11pmon Wednesday. Billy Hollis, Deputy Launching Authority for Dover RNLI said: ‘Our crew of eight volunteers were tasked to search an area known as Varn Bank, south of Dover.

‘Throughout the evening we were operating approximately eight miles away from where Dungeness lifeboat were searching, which gives an idea of the sizeable search area

’Throughout the evening we were operating approximately eight miles away from where Dungeness lifeboat were searching, which gives an idea of the sizeable search area.’

At midnight, both Dungeness and DOver RNLI lifeboats were still searching for any sign of the missing trawler. The RNLI’s all-weather lifeboats are equipped to search up to 100 nautical miles out to sea. At the speeds they were travelling, it was estimated the lifeboats could search for several days without needing to refuel.

  • Update 7am, Thursday 29 January. Hastings RNLI lifeboat crew were asked to join he search at 12.15am today (Thursday). Dungeness RNLI lifeboat crew were stood down at 12.50am. And at 4.45am, both Dover and Hastings RNLI lifeboats returned to their stations when the search was suspended, possibly to recommence at first light

Press Report

BBC   29 January 2015 Last updated at 17:04

Missing trawler rescue teams find bodies in English Channel

The vessel believed to be missing off Dungeness

The vessel went missing in rough seas and strong winds

Rescuers searching for a Belgian trawler missing in the English Channel with four people on board have recovered two bodies from the sea.

The search for the fishing boat began on Wednesday afternoon when it vanished in rough seas and gale force winds.

The RNLI said the bodies, which were found in the sea off Boulogne, had been recovered back to the French port.

A life jacket and wooden debris were spotted by a French fixed wing aircraft north-west of Boulogne earlier.

Those on board the Z85 Morgenster are believed to be Dutch, Portuguese and Belgian.

A coastguard helicopter, two Kent lifeboats and a French search and rescue helicopter carried out the first search for the trawler, which had been fishing in the Dover Strait.

A number of Belgian and Dutch fishing vessels have also been in the area looking for any signs of the missing vessel.

UK: Man rescued after being thrown from out of control speedboat in Teignmouth, Devon – Published 160514 1645z

A mans had a lucky escape after being thrown from his speedboat in Teignmouth Quay.

Brixham Coastguard received a 999 call from a member of the public just after 10am this morning, reporting that a man had been hurled into the water from his speedboat. The boat was then going round in circles and the man was trying to swim away to safety.

The Teignmouth Coastguard Rescue Team and the Teignmouth RNLI inshore lifeboat were sent to the scene. The lifeboat crew managed to bring the boat under control by cutting the engine. The man had been picked up by another boat nearby and was brought ashore where he was met by Coastguard Rescue Officers. Hes since been taken to hospital to be checked over, but doesnt appear to have been badly hurt.

Andre Huber, Watch Manager at Brixham Coastguard, said:

It appears the man took off his kill cord as it was too short to allow him to tie up his boat. Unfortunately, he accidentally knocked the throttle, the boat jerked forward and he fell into the water. Without the kill cord, the boats engine didnt cut out and then locked into driving round and round in circles.

Luckily he did have a lifejacket on and was able to quickly swim away to safety and the boat was soonbrought under control.

We always recommend people wear their kill cord at all times when on the boat. Make sure its a suitable length so you can move around your vessel, particularly if youre on your own.

As were set for fine weather this weekend, wed just like to remind everyone to have fun but stay safe on our coastline. If you get into difficulty, call 999 and ask for the Coastguard, or get in touch with us via VHF channel 16.

Teignmouth lifeboat crew stop out of control speedboat


(Video credit: RNLI)

Published on May 16, 2014

A man who fell overboard from his speedboat knocked the throttle as he went, leaving the speedboat to spin out of control. He had been wearing a kill cord, but had taken it off to moor the boat when the accident happened. The volunteer crew of Teignmouth lifeboat raced to the scene and managed to stop the out of control boat. The man, who was wearing a lifejacket, was rescued and taken to hospital as a precaution.

UK: Exmouth RNLI’s New State Of The Art ‘Shannon Class’ Lifeboat Arrives – Published 090514 2047z

Exmouth first in the South West to receive the new advanced ‘Shannon’ class lifeboat today

The R and J Welburn arrived. She was welcome by locals and tourists. Also a flotilla of local boats and Exmouth lifeboats: Mersey class Margaret Jean and D class George Bearman; Torbay Severn class lifeboat, Alec and Christina Dykes and Teignmouth Atlantic 85 class lifeboat, The Two Annes.

Exmouth RNLI organised a special trip aboard the Pride of Exmouth (Stuart Line Cruises) view and join the flotilla. Fortunately the weather held up, bright sunshine but windy. Goaty was on board to witness events first hand. Here are some photos, sadly the camera had a fault, so these had to be taken with a mobile phone camera, with the resultant loss of quality.

 

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Special thanks to Tina from Exmouth RNLI for the welcome and assistance.

About the Shannon Class Lifeboat

Each new Shannon class lifeboat costs about 1.5 – 2M and is the first modern RNLI all-weather lifeboat to operate with water jets, not propellers. Capable of 25 knots, the Shannon is 50% faster than the classes it has been designed to replace, which have a lower maximum speed of 17 knots.

R and J Welburn replaces Exmouth RNLIs elderly Mersey-class vessel. She is the first Shannon to be derlivered to an RNLI station in the South West and only the second in the whole of the UK.

The Mersey class takes 25 minutes to launch. On average it will take just 10 minutes to launch the new Shannon, offering faster turn arounds and the chance to respond quickly to another call out.

The Shannon class will also improve safety for the charitys volunteer crews, thanks to its shock absorbing seats and on-board computer system, which allows the crews to operate and monitor the lifeboat from the safety of their seats.

Michael Vlasto, RNLI Operations Director says:

I have had the privilege of being involved with the RNLI for over 38 years. In that time I have witnessed great advances in the charitys lifeboats and seen many new vessels arrive on station. However, I have never seen our volunteer crews quite as excited as they are about the Shannon. This all-weather lifeboat is half as fast again as the lifeboats it has been designed to replace and using water jet propulsion, the manoeuvrability is exceptional. Most importantly though, the Shannon has been carefully developed with the safety of the volunteer crews at the very heart of the design, allowing them to shave life-saving moments off the time it takes to reach those in trouble at sea.

The Shannon has been developed by the RNLIs in-house team of naval architects, marine engineers and operators to replace the majority of Mersey and some remaining Tyne class lifeboats as they reach the end of their operational life (subject to the RNLIs 5yr-rolling review of lifesaving assets). Once the Shannon is rolled out across the UK and Ireland, this class of lifeboat will make up a third of the RNLI all-weather lifeboat fleet, at which point the RNLI will have reached its aim of operating a 25 knot all-weather lifeboat fleet.

The majority of the 50+ Shannon class lifeboats to be stationed throughout the UK and Ireland will be built at the RNLIs new All-weather Lifeboat Centre in Poole, which is currently under construction. Bringing all-weather lifeboat production in-house, will save the charity 3.7M annually.

The Shannon is designed to lie afloat or launched and recovered from a beach using a bespoke launch and recovery vehicle (L&RV), which has been designed in conjunction with Supacat Ltd. It operates in many different beach and sea conditions and allows a faster launch and recovery time compared with the Mersey system (10 and 25 minutes respectively on average) thanks to a turntable system which cradles and rotates the lifeboat ready for its next launch. Every L&RV costs 1.5M.

The naming of the Shannon class follows in a 45-year tradition of naming the charitys lifeboats after rivers or stretches of water, but it will be the first time that the name of an Irish river has been used, which reflects the fact that our volunteers save lives at sea around Ireland and the UK.

Replaced lifeboats are sold to other rescue organisations, private companies or individuals. The RNLI sells old lifeboats to fellow members of the International Lifeboat Federation around the world, including Iceland, Finland, Chile and Madeira. The money raised helps the RNLI to meet its aims.

Shannon class lifeboat arriving at Exmouth RNLI

(Video credit: Exmouth RNLI)

Published on May 9, 2014

A compliation of video clips taken throughout the memorable day on Exmouth beach.

It starts with the launching of the Mersey class lifeboat, ‘Margaret Jean’ with ex-Coxswain Tim Mock who retired earlier in 2014. Then follows the flotilla of Mersey class, Shannon class ‘R and J Welburn’ (decked out in bunting), followed by D class ‘George Bearman’ and Teignmouth RNLI’s Atlantic 85 class ‘The Two Annes’.

The lifeboats pass through the estuary and into the river Exe before returning and our new Shannon lands on the beach in front of the crowd. Members of the Exe sailing club join in on the celebration.

Following a 180 degree turn, R and J Welburn relaunches and shows off a few manoeuvres before landing on the beach again.

After recovery and another spin, she moves towards the boathouse where she finally comes home to Exmouth RNLI.

Related:

Shannon-class lifeboat

http://www.rnli.org/newlifeboatappeal

https://goatysnews.wordpress.com/?s=RNLI&submit=Search

Key facts about the RNLI

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution is the charity that saves lives at sea. Our volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland from 236 lifeboat stations, including four along the River Thames and inland lifeboat stations at Loch Ness, Lough Derg, Enniskillen and Lough Ree. Additionally the RNLI has more than 1,000 lifeguards on over 180 beaches around the UK and operates a specialist flood rescue team, which can respond anywhere across the UK and Ireland when inland flooding puts lives at risk.

The RNLI relies on public donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. As a charity it is separate from, but works alongside, government-controlled and funded coastguard services. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824 our lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved at least 140,000 lives. Volunteers make up 95% of the charity, including 4,600 volunteer lifeboat crew members and 3,000 volunteer shore crew. Additionally, tens of thousands of other dedicated volunteers raise funds and awareness, give safety advice, and help in our museums, shops and offices.

Learn more about the RNLI

For more information please visit the RNLI website or Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. News releases, videos and photos are available on the News Centre.

Contacting the RNLI public enquiries

Members of the public may contact the RNLI on 0845 122 6999 or by email.

The RNLI is a charity registered in England and Wales (209603) and Scotland (SC037736). Charity number CHY 2678 in the Republic of Ireland

 

Ireland: Skerries Inshore Lifeboat rescues 3 men from fishing vessel grounded on rocks off Balbriggan – Published 250414 1113z

Skerries RNLI rescued three men last night (Thursday 24 April) after their 30 foot fishing vessel ran aground on rocks north of Balbriggan harbour in extremely poor visibility.

The volunteer crew launched their inshore lifeboat shortly after 9pm with Rob Morgan as Helm and crew members Emma Wilson, Stephen Crowley and Laura Boylan also on board. Dublin Coast Guard requested the lifeboat to launch after receiving of reports that a vessel had struck rocks north of Balbriggan harbour.
The lifeboat proceeded directly to the area indicated by Dublin Coast Guard. Conditions on the night were calm with a force one Southerly wind. There was a thick sea fog in the area at the time and visibility was reduced to one to two metres.
Clogherhead RNLI all weather lifeboat also launched at 10pm after Skerries RNLI requested their assistance given the possibility that a long and difficult search may have been necessary. Coast guard helicopter R116 and Skerries coast guard ground unit were also tasked.

Communication with the vessel in distress was established through another fishing vessel. Along with the information relayed from the vessel, the volunteer crew used the radar and direction finder on board their Atlantic 85 inshore lifeboat to pinpoint the casualties location.

The three men were taken on board the lifeboat where they were assessed and did not require any medical attention. Clogherhead RNLI , Skerries coast guard and Rescue helicopter R116 were all stood down. Skerries RNLI returned the three men to the lifeboat station where they were reunited with waiting family members.

Speaking after the call out, Rob Morgan , Skerries RNLI Helm said: ’Visibility was extremely poor out there this evening. The volunteers training really paid off, particularly with the radar and VHF direction finding equipment . Thankfully we found them in time and it was a good result.’ –

  • Date:
    25/04/2014
  • Author: Gerry Canning/RNLI

RNLI VIDEO (link)

Scotland: Barra and Tobermory lifeboats assist stricken cargo ship 30 miles SW of Tiree (Video) – Published 140414 1548z

Tobermory RNLI lifeboat returned to its station this morning after a 17 hour, 180 mile rescue mission to assist a stricken cargo ship. Barra Island RNLI lifeboat will be returning to stand by later today (13 April 2013).

The Tobermory crew relieved the Barra Island lifeboat last night and stood by the 88 metre cargo ship (G: MV Wilson Gdynia) which is now drifting some 30 miles south west of Tiree in rough weather. Given that the cargo ship is drifting in a north westerly direction and is not in danger of encountering any hazards at present, Stornoway Coastguard stood down the Tobermory lifeboat at daybreak.

Having spent more than 14 hours on the ‘shout’ yesterday, Barra Island lifeboat will return to the cargo ship to provide assistance this evening until the arrival of an ocean going tug which is currently en route from Aberdeen and is expected to arrive in the early hours of Monday morning. The cargo ship has eight crew on board.

Tobermory RNLI Coxswain Andrew McHaffie said: ‘This was a long shout in difficult conditions with seas of up to ten metres at times.’


(Video credit: RNLI)

Published on Apr 14, 2014

A 88-metre cargo ship with steering problems battling gale force winds and seas of up to ten metres 15 miles west of the Skerryvore light house. Lifeboats from Barra and Tobermory stood by for over 24 hours.

Key facts about the RNLI

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution is the charity that saves lives at sea. Our volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland from 236 lifeboat stations, including four along the River Thames and inland lifeboat stations at Loch Ness, Lough Derg, Enniskillen and Lough Ree. Additionally the RNLI has more than 1,000 lifeguards on over 180 beaches around the UK and operates a specialist flood rescue team, which can respond anywhere across the UK and Ireland when inland flooding puts lives at risk.

The RNLI relies on public donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. As a charity it is separate from, but works alongside, government-controlled and funded coastguard services. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824 our lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved at least 140,000 lives. Volunteers make up 95% of the charity, including 4,600 volunteer lifeboat crew members and 3,000 volunteer shore crew. Additionally, tens of thousands of other dedicated volunteers raise funds and awareness, give safety advice, and help in our museums, shops and offices.

Wales: EXERCISE – Coastguard Rescue Teams, RNLI lifeboats, RAF search & rescue helicopter, Police, Fire & Ambulance attend major incident in Cardiff Bay – 020414 1100z

(Photo: Barry Coastguard)

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(Photo: )

EX DRAIG: INCIDENT IN CARDIFF BAY

EXERCISE: PLEASE NOTE THIS IS FOR AN  TESTING THE EMERGENCY RESPONSE IN CARDIFF BAY
Swansea Coastguard was first contacted just before 11am this morning to reports that two boats had collided in Cardiff Bay.
The Penarth, Barry and Chepstow Coastguard Rescue Teams have been sent to the scene, along with the Penarth and Barry RNLI lifeboats and the RAF search and rescue helicopter from RMB Chivenor. Police, fire and ambulance crews are also in attendance.
At this time, it is not clear how many people were on board and the extent of any injuries. A search and rescue mission is ongoing.” – MCA

“Barry Coastguard at Cardiff Bay with all emergency services, carrying out major incident training. With Penarth and Chepstow Coastguard . Air sea rescue have been tasked to assist in a mock rescue in the Bay” – Barry Coastguard



UK: 3 launches in 3 days for Lizard lifeboat – 191113 1605z

Falmouth Packet

The Lizard lifeboat has launched three times in as many days to assist yachts in difficulties off Lizard Point.

On Tuesday, November 12 at 8:30am The Lizard lifeboat was launched to a lone sailor onboard Yacht Quintess 2 on passage from Brixham to Ireland that required assistance after the yachts sails were blown out and the vessels engine stopped working.

The yachts occupant had broadcast a Mayday call the night before but was unable to broadcast his position before all the electrics failed. The yacht was left bobbing around overnight before being located by a fishing vessel three miles south west of Lizard Point.

Falmouth Coastguard was contacted and The Lizard lifeboat was launched to rescue the yacht. The yacht was then towed to Falmouth Harbour. The Lifeboat returned to station at 1:00pm.

(Video credit: RNLI) A yacht that had damaged its rigging and had problems with its engine was helped by The Lizard lifeboat. The yacht, with one person on board, was towed safely back to Falmouth.

At 5:30pm the same evening The Lizard lifeboat was again launched to assist a lone yachtsman onboard the Yacht Apsu, 20 miles southeast of Lizard Point that had suffered damaged rigging after being hit by a large wave.

The vessel was returning to the Helford River from Spain and its engine then failed and again the yacht was left bobbing around. Falmouth Coastguard requested The Lizard lifeboat launch and assist the vessel. The yacht was towed to Falmouth Harbour. The lifeboat returned to station at just after midnight.

On Thursday evening at 4:50pm The Lizard lifeboat was launched to assist in a search for a person thought to have fallen over the cliff at Old Lizard Head. The Coastguard rescue teams from Mullion and Porthoustock and a rescue helicopter from 771 Squadron RNAS Culdrose were also involved in the search. It very soon became apparent that the call was a false alarm and all the rescue units were stood down with the lifeboat returning to station at 6:15pm.” – Falmouth Packet

The Lizard lifeboat alongside Yacht Apsu. Credit Andrew Putt.

Related:

 

RNLI | Goaty’s News

UK: Oban and Tobermory Lifeboats in rescue of diver with suspected ‘bends’ or decompression sickness ashore on Mull – 270813 2035z

Tobermory RNLI’s volunteer crew went to the aid of a diver with suspected ‘bends’ or decompression sickness ashore on the same day that the RNLI has called on divers to help undertake research into diver safety.

Tobermory Lifeboat (Photo: RNLI)

 

The crew were preparing to attend the station for their weekly Tuesday night training session when their pagers went off shortly after 1830. The male diver, who had developed possible symptoms of decompression sickness having come ashore in Tobermory, was taken on to the Severn class lifeboat which launched at 1850. Tobermory lifeboat proceeded to rendezvous with Oban lifeboat in the Sound of Mull. The casualty was transferred onto Oban lifeboat which had a specialist dive doctor on board. The casualty was then taken to Oban to be transferred to the care of the Scottish Ambulance Service.

 

The ‘shout’ came on the same day that the RNLI called on divers the charity with research into participation and attitudes to safety in the sport by taking part in an online survey which launches today.

Last year alone, 314 diving incidents were reported to the British Sub-Aqua Club (BSAC). The RNLI, in partnership with the British Diving Safety Group (BDSG), is asking divers and dive instructors in the UK to take ten minutes to complete an online survey, which looks at their reasons for participating in diving, how often they take to the water, preferred methods and locations, experience and training, awareness of possible hazards and use of safety measures. The findings will be used to help the RNLI and BDSG develop tailored and relevant safety messages for the diving community, to help make the sport even safer.

Tobermory’s full time Coxswain Andrew McHaffie said: ‘This was a timely reminder that whilst diving is a popular sport, problems can and do arise. This year alone, Tobermory RNLI has gone to the assistance of six divers. Nationally, the RNLI’s volunteer lifeboat crews have rescued 96 divers and saved 13 divers’ lives in the past five years. The RNLI is hoping to hear from divers of all levels of experience, so we can then develop really targeted and relevant safety advice to help them enjoy their sport as safely as possible.’

The online survey will run for nine weeks, during which time anyone who dives in the UK – no matter how often or what level of experience – is invited to visit http://www.rnlidiving.substance.coop and complete the short survey. The research is being undertaken by Substance, on behalf of the RNLI. To supplement the online survey, face-to-face surveys will be conducted at dive sites, charter boat launch and departure points, and at the NEC Dive Show (Dive 2013) in October. In-depth interviews and focus groups will also be conducted. Divers wishing to take part in these are encouraged to contact Substance via the survey website.

This was Tobermory RNLI’s 33rd launch of 2013 and so far this year the volunteer crew has assisted 56 people.

Key facts about the RNLI

 

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution is the charity that saves lives at sea. Our volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland from 236 lifeboat stations, including four along the River Thames and inland lifeboat stations at Loch Ness, Lough Derg, Enniskillen and Lough Ree. Additionally the RNLI has more than 1,000 lifeguards on over 180 beaches around the UK and operates a specialist flood rescue team, which can respond anywhere across the UK and Ireland when inland flooding puts lives at risk.

 

The RNLI relies on public donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. As a charity it is separate from, but works alongside, government-controlled and funded coastguard services. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824 our lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved at least 140,000 lives. Volunteers make up 95% of the charity, including 4,600 volunteer lifeboat crew members and 3,000 volunteer shore crew. Additionally, tens of thousands of other dedicated volunteers raise funds and awareness, give safety advice, and help in our museums, shops and offices. – RNLI

 

A map from the Ordnance Survey of grid reference NM at a scale of 1:250.000 (Image: wikimedia.org)

RNLI reveals new stations earmarked for charity’s most advanced £2m lifeboat – 150413 1830z

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/3/3e/Royal_National_Lifeboat_Institution.svg/250px-Royal_National_Lifeboat_Institution.svg.png

Today (Monday 15 April), the RNLI is announcing five more RNLI lifeboat stations earmarked to receive the charity’s latest and most advanced class of lifeboat – the Shannon class – which is 50% faster than the lifeboats it will replace.

(Photo: maritimejournal.com) Shannon class Lifeboat

RNLI Lifeboat Stations Amble in Northumberland, Douglas on the Isle of Man, Workington in West Cumbria, Fleetwood in Lancashire and Wells in Norfolk have been earmarked to receive the Shannon, as their current all-weather lifeboats are reaching the end of their planned 25-year life span. Fleetwood will be in receipt of the Shannon in 2015, Douglas, Wells and Workington in 2016 and Amble in 2017.

(Photo: exmouthjournal.co.uk)

Each new Shannon class lifeboat costs £2M and the RNLI is currently working to identify whether the funding for the new lifeboats, their launch and recovery vehicles and associated shoreworks (if needed) can be raised from legacy gifts or whether fundraising activity is needed. The RNLI will make a local announcement once the funding strategy has been identified.

(Photo: theengineer.co.uk)

The Shannon is the first modern RNLI all-weather lifeboat to operate with water jets, not propellers. Capable of 25 knots, the Shannon is 50% faster than the classes it has been designed to replace, which have a lower maximum speed of 17 knots. The Shannon class will also improve safety for the charity’s volunteer crews, thanks to its shock absorbing seats and on-board computer system, which allows the crews to operate and monitor the lifeboat from the safety of their seats.

(Photo: exmouthjournal.co.uk)

Michael Vlasto, RNLI Operations Director says:

‘I have had the privilege of being involved with the RNLI for over 38 years. In that time I have witnessed great advances in the charity’s lifeboats and seen many new vessels arrive on station. However, I have never seen our volunteer crews quite as excited as they are about the Shannon. This all-weather lifeboat is half as fast again as the lifeboats it has been designed to replace and using water jet propulsion, the manoeuvrability is exceptional. Most importantly though, the Shannon has been carefully developed with the safety of the volunteer crews at the very heart of the design, allowing them to shave life-saving moments off the time it takes to reach those in trouble at sea.’

(Photo: RNLI)

The Shannon has been developed by the RNLI’s in-house team of naval architects, marine engineers and operators to replace the majority of Mersey and some remaining Tyne class lifeboats as they reach the end of their operational life (subject to the RNLI’s 5yr-rolling review of lifesaving assets). Once the Shannon is rolled out across the UK and Ireland, this class of lifeboat will make up a third of the RNLI all-weather lifeboat fleet, at which point the RNLI will have reached its aim of operating a 25 knot all-weather lifeboat fleet.

(Photo: RNLI)

The majority of the 50+ Shannon class lifeboats to be stationed throughout the UK and Ireland will be built at the RNLI’s new All-weather Lifeboat Centre in Poole, which is currently under construction. Bringing all-weather lifeboat production in-house, will save the charity £3.7M annually.

(Photo: iwitness24.co.uk)

• To date (April 2013) the RNLI can confirm that it plans to provide the following stations with a Shannon class lifeboat: Amble, Douglas, Dungeness, Exmouth, Fleetwood, Hoylake, Ilfracombe, Llandudno, Lowestoft, Montrose, Scarborough, Skegness, Selsey, St Ives, Swanage, Wells and Workington. All other stations are yet to be confirmed.
• The Shannon is designed to lie afloat or launched and recovered from a beach using a bespoke launch and recovery vehicle (L&RV), which has been designed in conjunction with Supacat Ltd. It operates in many different beach and sea conditions and allows a faster launch and recovery time compared with the Mersey system (10 and 25 minutes respectively on average) thanks to a turntable system which cradles and rotates the lifeboat ready for its next launch. Every L&RV costs £1.5M.
• The naming of the Shannon class follows in a 45-year tradition of naming the charity’s lifeboats after rivers or stretches of water, but it will be the first time that the name of an Irish river has been used, which reflects the fact that our volunteers save lives at sea around Ireland and the UK.
• Replaced lifeboats are sold to other rescue organisations, private companies or individuals. The RNLI sells old lifeboats to fellow members of the International Lifeboat Federation around the world, including Iceland, Finland, Chile and Madeira. The money raised helps the RNLI to meet its aims.
• More information on the new Shannon class lifeboat can be found online: http://www.rnli.org/newlifeboatappeal

Shannon – the next generation of RNLI lifeboat

Key facts about the RNLI

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution is the charity that saves lives at sea. Our volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland from 236 lifeboat stations, including four along the River Thames and inland lifeboat stations at Loch Ness, Lough Derg, Enniskillen and Lough Ree. Additionally the RNLI has more than 1,000 lifeguards on over 180 beaches around the UK and operates a specialist flood rescue team, which can respond anywhere across the UK and Ireland when inland flooding puts lives at risk.

The RNLI relies on public donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. As a charity it is separate from, but works alongside, government-controlled and funded coastguard services. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824 our lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved at least 140,000 lives. Volunteers make up 95% of the charity, including 4,600 volunteer lifeboat crew members and 3,000 volunteer shore crew. Additionally, tens of thousands of other dedicated volunteers raise funds and awareness, give safety advice, and help in our museums, shops and offices.

Learn more about the RNLI

For more information please visit the RNLI website or Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. News releases, videos and photos are available on the News Centre.

Contacting the RNLI – public enquiries

Members of the public may contact the RNLI on 0845 122 6999 or by email.

The RNLI is a charity registered in England and Wales (209603) and Scotland (SC037736). Charity number CHY 2678 in the Republic of Ireland

Related:

Shannon-class lifeboat

https://goatysnews.wordpress.com/?s=lifeboat&submit=Search

Scotland gets new permanent RNLI lifeboat station at Leverburgh in the Hebrides – 110413 1540z

The RNLIs lifeboat station in Leverburgh in the Hebrides is to become permanent following a successful trial, the charity announces today. (Thurs 11 April)

Leverburgh lifeboat (Photo credit: RNLI/Richard Smith)

Leverburgh lifeboat
(Photo credit: RNLI/Richard Smith)

The charitys trustees have given the go-ahead for the station at Leverburgh in the Hebrides to become Scotlands 46th station. This is the newest all-weather station in Scotland for more than 20 years.

The decision was taken after the lifeboat attended 16 incidents in less than a year, making it one of the busier boats in Scotland, and the dedication of the small community to train as the volunteer crew. The RNLI had estimated between five to 10 shouts annually at Leverburgh.

John MacLean, Leverburghs Lifeboat Operations Manager, says today, From an operational point of view, it is satisfying to know that Leverburgh has been granted permanent status. The central position in the islands, with access to east and west, made it an ideal location.

The number of “shouts” has been at least up to national average, crew numbers have been maintained in a sparsely populated area, and dedication shown by them for the RNLI cause has been outstanding. It is gratifying to know that the enthusiasm shown and the time dedicated from the start has now been rewarded.

The station was launched last May to fill a gap in the coastal cover provided by the charity. The nearest stations are at Stornoway, Portree and Barra and they had covered the Sound of Harris area where Leverburgh is situated.

In recent years the RNLI had received representations from the South Harris Community Council for a lifeboat. The growth of offshore fish farms and renewable energy projects, and an increase in leisure craft prompted the call for a new station.
Local fishing boats had been used to resolving mechanical problems amongst themselves, due to the distance from the RNLIs stations.
A trial station was established on 11 May and by the end of 2012 the volunteers had been called out on 13 occasions.

Leverburghs shouts have been varied. They include helping fishing boats, rescuing a family from an island, searching for a missing canoeist, being on standby when a young Minke whale was in the village harbour, rescuing a sheep stuck on a ledge, and being on standby when a body was found at the bottom of cliffs.
The average length of a service has been about 3.5 hours, with the longest taking up to nine hours. There are currently 17 enrolled crew, including one woman and a part-time mechanic. Training has included courses at the RNLIs Lifeboat College in Poole, visits to Leverburgh from other coxswains and mechanics, and trips to flank stations.

Neil Campbell, chairman of Leverburgh Lifeboat Management Group, says, The news of confirmation of a permanent RNLI station for Leverburgh will be warmly welcomed and a fitting reward for the dedication to training by the coxswains and crew.
Support for the Leverburgh lifeboat has been overwhelming , a sum approaching £30,000 has now been raised for the RNLI over the year since the lifeboat went on station in May 2012 by the local Branch with support from the wider community including the whole of Harris, Berneray and the Northern half of the Uists.

The lifeboat station is operated from a portable building and the RNLI has no immediate plans to replace this structure.

Hamish Taylor, honorary president at Leverburgh, says, In initially building our case for the establishment of a lifeboat at Leverburgh, we were very much aware that the successful operation of all stations depends very much on the support and goodwill of host communities. From the very beginning, the communities of Harris, Berneray and the northern half of the Uists have been supremely supportive of Leverburgh Lifeboat Station and this has had positive benefits not only for the successful operation of the station but also in connecting the communities more closely together in this common purpose.

As a wholly donation-dependent charity, the RNLI is wholly dependent on contributions from the public, and yet again the communities served by Leverburgh Lifeboat Station have in this first year of operation demonstrated that despite being one of the most economically challenged areas in the United Kingdom, they are also among the most generous.

Leverburgh has a Mersey class lifeboat, The Royal Thames. The RNLI is going to replace the Mersey class lifeboats with the new Shannon class and therefore Leverburgh may in due course receive a Shannon boat. It costs on average £4,100 a week to operate an RNLI all-weather lifeboat station.

3 May 2012

Tobermory lifeboat meets the Leverburgh lifeboat on passage to her new station on the Isle of Harris. The Leverburgh lifeboat carries out a towing exercise before being welcomed by the sound of bagpipes into Tobermory Bay.

Leverburgh’s lifeboat, ‘Lifetime Care’, arrived at the brand new trial lifeboat station on Wednesday 2 May

(Video credit: RNLI)

Video below: A compilation of rescue footage taken on board Scottish RNLI lifeboats throughout 2012 – featuring footage from Largs, Aberdeen, Anstruther, Tobermory, Kinghorn, Broughty Ferry, Loch Ness, Lerwick, Thurso, Stornoway, Lochinver, Peterhead, Leverburgh, Barra, Stromness, Longhope, Dunbar and Helensburgh.

(Video credit: RNLI)

UK: Dylan Cecil: Body found of 4-yr-old swept out to sea at Burnham-on-Sea – Updated 230812 1822Z

(Image: motorboatsmonthly)
Portland Coastguard Rescue Helicopter – soon to be axed

A search involving a helicopters, coastguard rescue teams and two lifeboats is ongoing near the jetty at

(Image: wikimedia.org)
Burnham-on-Sea shown within Somerset
(Click image for source)

Burnham-on-Sea for a missing 4-year-old that was seen entering the water.

The parents of the child have been treated on scene after they went in after the boy and required medical treatment for water ingestion.

A member of the public dialled 999 at 6.04 pm to inform Swansea Coastguard that they had seen two adults go in the water to attempt to rescue a small child and that they needed medical assistance.

Swansea Coastguard sent the Burnham-on-Sea Coastguard Rescue Team to the scene, along with the two Burnham-on-Sea RNLI lifeboats.

The Coastguard Rescue helicopter from Portland is also on scene, along with a Police helicopter and Avon Ambulance Service.  The search is currently still ongoing. – MCA

A search for a missing four year old boy has been underway this afternoon at the Esplanade at Burnham-on-Sea.

Police were called by the ambulance service at around 6pm to reports of a missing boy after his parents were pulled from the water.

All emergency services have been in attendance including the police and coast guard helicopters. A thorough search has been underway all afternoon and will continue.

The public are thanked for their assistance. – Avon & Somerset Police

2130BST: The search has just been called off due to a lack of light – it will resume tomorrow morning – Sky News.

2152: MCA (Coastguard Agency in UK) have just tweeted: “Just to confirm, search is still ongoing at Burnham on Sea. Three lifeboats, two Coastguard Rescue Teams and an RAF helicopter are on scene.”

2300: Lifeboats from Western Super Mare have been stood down in search at Burnham on Sea. Other resources still on scene.

2320:  @MCA_media: #RAF helicopter stood down in #Burnham on Sea search. 2 #Coastguard Rescue Teams & 2 lifeboats continue to search

See also: burnham-on-sea.com (They do state search suspended overnight which is incorrect, but some good photos of this unfolding sad event.

Monday 20 Aug 2012 0842 BST: Coastguard say the search for a 4-year-old boy missing in the water at Burnham-on-Sea is now a recovery operation (BBC Somerset)

Rescue teams are continuing to search for a four-year-old boy who went missing at Burnham-on-Sea in Somerset on Sunday evening.

Emergency services were called at about 18:00 BST after the boy’s parents were seen going into the sea to try to rescue him.

They were treated at the scene for water ingestion.

Emergency services searched for part of the night, with teams from Clevedon, Weston, Watchet and Portishead.

The call was made by someone who saw the boy’s parents jumping in at the jetty, which is about two metres deep.

‘Very sad’

Dave Hughes from the Maritime and Coastguard Agency, said: “At one point we had five coastguard rescue teams, three search-and-rescue aircraft and six inshore lifeboats all searching that area.”

He said that at the time of the rescue the water was at high tide, but once it ebbed overnight teams were able to expand their search along the exposed area of beach.

The tide is expected to come back in at about 09:30 BST. Teams will decide then whether to wait until the tide is lower so they can see more of the coastline again.

BBC reporter Clinton Rogers, speaking from the scene at Burnham, said: “As I look out I can see two lifeboats, they are searching quite a long stretch of coastline – about a five-mile stretch as far out as Bridgwater Bay.

“It’s very sad to see the family looking out over the wall, desperately clinging on to hope of good news, but everyone is now convinced this is an operation that will eventually recover a body – that’s the sadness of it – but they’re not giving up.” – BBC Somerset

Coastguards are continuing what they now call a “search and recovery operation” as they look for a four year old boy missing at Burnham-on-Sea.

It’s believed the boy from Kettering was with his family when he fell off a slipway into the sea. Emergency services were called when his parents were seen in the water trying to rescue him.

As the tide began to go out late last night, the search continued.

This morning, an operation involving helicopters, lifeboats and hovercrafts carried on looking for the boy who had been missing for more than twelve hours. – ITV News

UPDATE: 23 Aug 2012 14:50:

Statement from Supt Keith McCoubrey, Head of Operations, Somerset West policing district.

“I can confirm we were called at about 12.30pm today by a member of the public to the body of a young boy found on the water’s edge near to the yacht club at Burnham-on-Sea.

The body is still to be formally identified but I believe it to be that of Dylan Cecil who went missing last Sunday evening.

“An intensive search was launched on Sunday and continued throughout the night into Monday morning to try to find the missing boy from Kettering.

“Well-rehearsed plans were rolled out involving the emergency services and agency partners including the police, fire, ambulance, HM Coast Guard, RNLI and Burnham-on-Sea Area Rescue Boat.

“I would like to thank all of these agencies for determination and commitment they demonstrated in their efforts to find Dylan.

“Dylan’s parents have been made aware,” said Supt McCoubrey.

Statement from Dylan’s family…

“We would like to thank everyone for their help and support during this difficult time.

“We would like to express our gratitude for all the messages of sympathy and support from both the local community and wider public across the nation.

“In particular we would like to thank the people involved in the search – the police, RNLI, HM Coast Guard and the Burnham-on-Sea Area Rescue Boat (BARB).

“We are still extremely traumatised but very grateful that it appears Dylan has been returned to allow us to bury our son.”

The family have requested that the media and public respect their privacy and allow them to grieve the loss of their son.
Update 23 Aug 2012:

Police confirm body found off coast of Burnham-on-Sea is that of 4-year-old Dylan Cecil – Sky News

Touching interview by Clinton Rogers. Mother of Dylan Cecil pays tribute after 4yo slips off Burnham jetty and drowns (Credit @danielrmilligan)

The 4 year old boy has been named as Dylan Cecil

(Photo: nevard.com)
Jetty at Burnham-On-Sea

21 Aug 2012: Dylan Cecil Facebook page removed after post ‘from heaven’ http://t.co/fwiAqbF8

Two rescued, two missing, after two RAF Tornados crash in Moray Firth, Scotland – Published 3 July 2012 1942 GMT/UTC

(Image: RAF)
Tornado GR4
(Click for more on GR4)

“Two people have been picked up by helicopter after two RAF Tornado jets crashed in the Moray Firth.

The Ministry of Defence (MoD) said the Tornado GR4s, which each have a crew of two, were from RAF Lossiemouth, on the Moray coast.

The RNLI said Wick, Invergordon and Buckie lifeboats were searching for two missing crew south of Wick.

The MoD said one of the aircraft had been seen in the water and the other was classed as “missing”.

Aberdeen Coastguard was alerted to the incident at about 13:50.

An RAF helicopter picked up two people and flew them to Raigmore Hospital in Inverness.” – BBC

More from BBC News

3 July 2012 2250 GMT/UTC:

Search for missing RAF aircrew suspended

UK: Search for fishing boat and 3 crew off Dorset Coast called off – Updated 1820BST 19th May 2012

(Search called off see update below)

RNLI lifeboats have been searching for a missing fishing boat and its three-man crew off the coast of Dorset for over 36 hours and another volunteer crew are to join the search (As of Saturday May 19, 0800BST).

A body believed to be that of one of the three missing fishermen was recovered from the sea by the Coastguard at around 5:30pm on Friday, according to a statement issued by Dorset Police. The families of the men have been informed.

The fishing boat, the Purbeck Isle, which is from Weymouth, was reported missing around 6pm on Thursday May 17 after it failed to return to port at its expected time.

Weymouth all weather lifeboat, the Ernest and Mabel, launched at 7:15pm on Thursday to search, along with HM Coastguard helicopters and the Royal Navy Warship, the HMS York. The Lyme Regis inshore lifeboat, the Spirit of Loch Fyne, launched just after 11pm to carry out an additional shoreline search of the coast to the west of Weymouth, along Chesil Beach, towards Bridport.

(Photo: RNLI)

The Weymouth lifeboat returned to station at 3:40am on Friday and a new volunteer crew went onboard to replace those who had been out searching for nearly nine hours. The lifeboat then headed back out to sea at 4:20am. The Lyme Regis lifeboat returned to station at around 3am.

The Weymouth lifeboat returned to the lifeboat station for another change of crew at around 2pm Friday and continued to search until 10.15pm, when it once again returned to the station.

The Exmouth all weather lifeboat, the Margaret Jean, is due to join the search for the two other fishermen at first light, around 4am, on Saturday morning.

Related: https://goatysnews.wordpress.com/2012/05/18/uk-hunt-for-fishing-boat-and-3-crew-reveals-wreckage-off-dorset-coast/

Update 1820BST 19/05/2012

Search for 2 remaining fishermen from F/V Purbeck Isle which sank off the Dorset coast called off – Sky News

UK: Hunt for fishing boat and 3 crew reveals wreckage off Dorset Coast

The search for a fishing boat and three crew missing off the Dorset coast has revealed a vessel on the seabed.

(Photo: BBC)
RNLI lifeboats, the Coastguard helicopter and a Royal Navy warship are searching for the vessel
(Click on photo to see full story)

The Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) said an uncharted wreck of similar size to the missing fishing boat, Purbeck Isle had been located.

It was discovered by a survey ship with sonar equipment involved in the search for the Weymouth-based boat.

Coastguards began an extensive search overnight after the crabber was reported missing at about 18:00 BST.

The crew were named locally as David MacFarland, Robert Prowse and Jack Craig

The crew of the boat was rescued in January 2011 after the vessel began taking on water off Chesil Beach, west of Portland. – BBC

(Photo: BBC)
The crew was rescued last year after the fishing vessel took on water
(Click on photo to see full story 3 January 2011)

Related: Search for missing fishing boat crew off Dorset

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-dorset-18112828