UK: RAF Search & Rescue Role Ends After 74 Years – Published 04 Oct 2015 1925z (GMT/UTC)

RAF Search & Rescue Role Ends After 74 Years

PROUD RECORD: 34,025 Call-outs completed and 26,853 lives saved

The RAF's final operational search and rescue sortie comes to an end at RMB Chivenor at 12.07 on 4 October 2015. (Image: RAF)

The RAF’s final operational search and rescue sortie comes to an end at RMB Chivenor at 12.07 on 4 October 2015. (Image: RAF)

More than 74 years of continuous life-saving operations by the Royal Air Force in the UK came to an end at 1.00pm today, when the Chivenor duty search and rescue crew was formally relieved from its standby commitment by the United Kingdom Aeronautical Rescue Coordination Centre. The finale for RAF Search and Rescue in the UK was ‘business as usual’ with a final search and rescue operation taking place in the early hours of this morning.

The crew of the RAF's final operational UK search and rescue sortie: (left to right) Wing Commander 'Sparky' Dunlop (captain and Officer Commanding 22 Squadron), Sergeant Dan Allanson, Sergeant Russ Jenkins and Flight Lieutenant 'PJ' Howard. (Image: RAF)

The crew of the RAF’s final operational UK search and rescue sortie: (left to right) Wing Commander ‘Sparky’ Dunlop (captain and Officer Commanding 22 Squadron), Sergeant Dan Allanson, Sergeant Russ Jenkins and Flight Lieutenant ‘PJ’ Howard. (Image: RAF)

Chivenor is the last of the RAF’s 6 search and rescue bases to hand over responsibility for helicopter search and rescue provision to Bristow Helicopters Ltd.

Official search and rescue statistics show that since 1983 the RAF’s 6 units completed 34,025 callouts and rescued 26,853 persons in distress.

The final RAF crew to hold operational search and rescue standby commitment in the UK: (left to right) Sergeant Doug Bowden, Flight Lieutenant Ayla Holdom, Flight Lieutenant Christian 'Taff' Wilkins and Flight Sergeant Chris Scurr.(Image: RAF)

The final RAF crew to hold operational search and rescue standby commitment in the UK: (left to right) Sergeant Doug Bowden, Flight Lieutenant Ayla Holdom, Flight Lieutenant Christian ‘Taff’ Wilkins and Flight Sergeant Chris Scurr.(Image: RAF)

Other Reports

BBC

Chivenor hands over air rescue services to private firm

AgustaWestland AW189 in Coastguard livery operated by Bristow

AgustaWestland AW189 in Coastguard livery operated by Bristow

An RAF air rescue team based at Chivenor in north Devon has handed over its role to a private firm.

Bristow took over from the military at RMB Chivenor at 13:00 BST and will fly out of St Athan in south Wales.

The handover was delayed by four days because Bristow said it needed extra time.

Aberdeen-based Bristow won a 10-year contract to take over the service, which is being privatised around the UK.

The £1.6bn search and rescue deal with Bristow ends 70 years of search and rescue from the RAF and Royal Navy.

END

Well done RAF! – Goaty 🙂

Related:

UK Search & Rescue helicopters to be cut by nearly 50% – 300313 1650z

UK Government plan to close 50% of UK Coastguard Maritime Rescue Co-ordination Centres – Updated 07 Feb 2013 0001Z: https://goatysnews.wordpress.com/2012/12/19/uk-government-plan-to-close-50-of-uk-coastguard-maritime-rescue-co-ordination-centres-published-23-aug-2012-2310z/

Privatising Search and Rescue: https://goatysnews.wordpress.com/2013/02/07/5765/

Could this be the coalition government’s biggest cock-up yet?: https://goatysnews.wordpress.com/2012/09/29/3435/

Support flaring for Clyde Coastguard, Scotland – Published 03 Sept 2012 1440Z: https://goatysnews.wordpress.com/2012/09/03/support-flaring-for-clyde-coastguard-scotland-published-03-sept-2012-1440z/

UK: Man rescued after being thrown from out of control speedboat in Teignmouth, Devon – Published 160514 1645z

A mans had a lucky escape after being thrown from his speedboat in Teignmouth Quay.

Brixham Coastguard received a 999 call from a member of the public just after 10am this morning, reporting that a man had been hurled into the water from his speedboat. The boat was then going round in circles and the man was trying to swim away to safety.

The Teignmouth Coastguard Rescue Team and the Teignmouth RNLI inshore lifeboat were sent to the scene. The lifeboat crew managed to bring the boat under control by cutting the engine. The man had been picked up by another boat nearby and was brought ashore where he was met by Coastguard Rescue Officers. Hes since been taken to hospital to be checked over, but doesnt appear to have been badly hurt.

Andre Huber, Watch Manager at Brixham Coastguard, said:

It appears the man took off his kill cord as it was too short to allow him to tie up his boat. Unfortunately, he accidentally knocked the throttle, the boat jerked forward and he fell into the water. Without the kill cord, the boats engine didnt cut out and then locked into driving round and round in circles.

Luckily he did have a lifejacket on and was able to quickly swim away to safety and the boat was soonbrought under control.

We always recommend people wear their kill cord at all times when on the boat. Make sure its a suitable length so you can move around your vessel, particularly if youre on your own.

As were set for fine weather this weekend, wed just like to remind everyone to have fun but stay safe on our coastline. If you get into difficulty, call 999 and ask for the Coastguard, or get in touch with us via VHF channel 16.

Teignmouth lifeboat crew stop out of control speedboat


(Video credit: RNLI)

Published on May 16, 2014

A man who fell overboard from his speedboat knocked the throttle as he went, leaving the speedboat to spin out of control. He had been wearing a kill cord, but had taken it off to moor the boat when the accident happened. The volunteer crew of Teignmouth lifeboat raced to the scene and managed to stop the out of control boat. The man, who was wearing a lifejacket, was rescued and taken to hospital as a precaution.

UK: Exmouth RNLI’s New State Of The Art ‘Shannon Class’ Lifeboat Arrives – Published 090514 2047z

Exmouth first in the South West to receive the new advanced ‘Shannon’ class lifeboat today

The R and J Welburn arrived. She was welcome by locals and tourists. Also a flotilla of local boats and Exmouth lifeboats: Mersey class Margaret Jean and D class George Bearman; Torbay Severn class lifeboat, Alec and Christina Dykes and Teignmouth Atlantic 85 class lifeboat, The Two Annes.

Exmouth RNLI organised a special trip aboard the Pride of Exmouth (Stuart Line Cruises) view and join the flotilla. Fortunately the weather held up, bright sunshine but windy. Goaty was on board to witness events first hand. Here are some photos, sadly the camera had a fault, so these had to be taken with a mobile phone camera, with the resultant loss of quality.

 

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Special thanks to Tina from Exmouth RNLI for the welcome and assistance.

About the Shannon Class Lifeboat

Each new Shannon class lifeboat costs about 1.5 – 2M and is the first modern RNLI all-weather lifeboat to operate with water jets, not propellers. Capable of 25 knots, the Shannon is 50% faster than the classes it has been designed to replace, which have a lower maximum speed of 17 knots.

R and J Welburn replaces Exmouth RNLIs elderly Mersey-class vessel. She is the first Shannon to be derlivered to an RNLI station in the South West and only the second in the whole of the UK.

The Mersey class takes 25 minutes to launch. On average it will take just 10 minutes to launch the new Shannon, offering faster turn arounds and the chance to respond quickly to another call out.

The Shannon class will also improve safety for the charitys volunteer crews, thanks to its shock absorbing seats and on-board computer system, which allows the crews to operate and monitor the lifeboat from the safety of their seats.

Michael Vlasto, RNLI Operations Director says:

I have had the privilege of being involved with the RNLI for over 38 years. In that time I have witnessed great advances in the charitys lifeboats and seen many new vessels arrive on station. However, I have never seen our volunteer crews quite as excited as they are about the Shannon. This all-weather lifeboat is half as fast again as the lifeboats it has been designed to replace and using water jet propulsion, the manoeuvrability is exceptional. Most importantly though, the Shannon has been carefully developed with the safety of the volunteer crews at the very heart of the design, allowing them to shave life-saving moments off the time it takes to reach those in trouble at sea.

The Shannon has been developed by the RNLIs in-house team of naval architects, marine engineers and operators to replace the majority of Mersey and some remaining Tyne class lifeboats as they reach the end of their operational life (subject to the RNLIs 5yr-rolling review of lifesaving assets). Once the Shannon is rolled out across the UK and Ireland, this class of lifeboat will make up a third of the RNLI all-weather lifeboat fleet, at which point the RNLI will have reached its aim of operating a 25 knot all-weather lifeboat fleet.

The majority of the 50+ Shannon class lifeboats to be stationed throughout the UK and Ireland will be built at the RNLIs new All-weather Lifeboat Centre in Poole, which is currently under construction. Bringing all-weather lifeboat production in-house, will save the charity 3.7M annually.

The Shannon is designed to lie afloat or launched and recovered from a beach using a bespoke launch and recovery vehicle (L&RV), which has been designed in conjunction with Supacat Ltd. It operates in many different beach and sea conditions and allows a faster launch and recovery time compared with the Mersey system (10 and 25 minutes respectively on average) thanks to a turntable system which cradles and rotates the lifeboat ready for its next launch. Every L&RV costs 1.5M.

The naming of the Shannon class follows in a 45-year tradition of naming the charitys lifeboats after rivers or stretches of water, but it will be the first time that the name of an Irish river has been used, which reflects the fact that our volunteers save lives at sea around Ireland and the UK.

Replaced lifeboats are sold to other rescue organisations, private companies or individuals. The RNLI sells old lifeboats to fellow members of the International Lifeboat Federation around the world, including Iceland, Finland, Chile and Madeira. The money raised helps the RNLI to meet its aims.

Shannon class lifeboat arriving at Exmouth RNLI

(Video credit: Exmouth RNLI)

Published on May 9, 2014

A compliation of video clips taken throughout the memorable day on Exmouth beach.

It starts with the launching of the Mersey class lifeboat, ‘Margaret Jean’ with ex-Coxswain Tim Mock who retired earlier in 2014. Then follows the flotilla of Mersey class, Shannon class ‘R and J Welburn’ (decked out in bunting), followed by D class ‘George Bearman’ and Teignmouth RNLI’s Atlantic 85 class ‘The Two Annes’.

The lifeboats pass through the estuary and into the river Exe before returning and our new Shannon lands on the beach in front of the crowd. Members of the Exe sailing club join in on the celebration.

Following a 180 degree turn, R and J Welburn relaunches and shows off a few manoeuvres before landing on the beach again.

After recovery and another spin, she moves towards the boathouse where she finally comes home to Exmouth RNLI.

Related:

Shannon-class lifeboat

http://www.rnli.org/newlifeboatappeal

https://goatysnews.wordpress.com/?s=RNLI&submit=Search

Key facts about the RNLI

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution is the charity that saves lives at sea. Our volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland from 236 lifeboat stations, including four along the River Thames and inland lifeboat stations at Loch Ness, Lough Derg, Enniskillen and Lough Ree. Additionally the RNLI has more than 1,000 lifeguards on over 180 beaches around the UK and operates a specialist flood rescue team, which can respond anywhere across the UK and Ireland when inland flooding puts lives at risk.

The RNLI relies on public donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. As a charity it is separate from, but works alongside, government-controlled and funded coastguard services. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824 our lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved at least 140,000 lives. Volunteers make up 95% of the charity, including 4,600 volunteer lifeboat crew members and 3,000 volunteer shore crew. Additionally, tens of thousands of other dedicated volunteers raise funds and awareness, give safety advice, and help in our museums, shops and offices.

Learn more about the RNLI

For more information please visit the RNLI website or Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. News releases, videos and photos are available on the News Centre.

Contacting the RNLI public enquiries

Members of the public may contact the RNLI on 0845 122 6999 or by email.

The RNLI is a charity registered in England and Wales (209603) and Scotland (SC037736). Charity number CHY 2678 in the Republic of Ireland

 

UK: 2,400 teens prepare for annual 2-day Ten Tors Challenge/Jubilee Challenge across Dartmoor – Published 050514 1720z

Image from Ten Tors website

UK: Have you seen 78 year old Joan Russell still missing from Exeter, Devon – 191113 1640z

Police in Exeter are continuing to search for a 78-year-old woman who has not been seen since 9.30pm on Friday 15 November.


Joan Russell was last seen at her home address in the Emmanuel Close area of Exeter. Because of her age and her condition she is considered vulnerable and police are concerned for her welfare.

Joan has limited mobility and walks with the aid of a walking stick. The stick was left behind as well as her money, medication, bus pass and other personal belongings.

She is believed to be wearing a grey skirt and a green light weight jacket. She is about 5ft 4ins and has grey wavy hair to her ears.

It is believed she may be in the St Thomas or Exwick area of the city.

If anyone believes they have seen her or has any information that could assist, please call police on 101 quoting log 261 of 16/11/13.

UK: Start Bay Search – 2 men rescued off Devon coast after their motor vessel broke down and they began drifting out to sea – 051013 1830z

SEARCH FOR MOTOR VESSEL IN START BAY

Saturday, 5 October 2013

(Image: torquayheraldexpress)

 

 

 

Two men have been rescued off the Devon coast after their motor vessel broke down and they began drifting out to sea.

 

 

At 1.18pm Brixham Coastguard was alerted to a faint VHF radio broadcast from the motor vessel Flying Fox calling Hello Hello. Brixham Coastguard spoke with the caller who said they had broken down and were drifting out to sea and believed they were in a position one or two nautical miles off Blackpool Sands, Devon but the vessel was finally located some five miles from this location.

 

 

Brixham Coastguard was contacted by the skipper of a nearby vessel called Shiraz who agreed to go the position and locate the motor boat but was unable to find it. Dartmouth Coastguard Rescue Team was called out to search from the shore for the boat. The VHF radio contact had been lost and a PAN PAN message was broadcast to all vessels in the area to keep a look out.

 

 

The casualty used a mobile phone to call Brixham Coastguard who asked them to use red flares which were not spotted. Brixham Coastguard asked the casualty to use their buoyant orange smoke floatand requested that the merchant vessel NCC Najem, which was transiting the area, look for the smoke ahead of them on their port side but in fact the crew of the tanker NCC Najem spotted the smoke five miles in the opposite direction and to their stern.

 

 

Once located, the motor vessel was towed to Dartmouth by the fishing vessel William Harvey.

 

 

Deputy Watch Manager at Brixham Coastguard, Matt Thornhill says,

 

 

Be well prepared when you set out to sea and make sure you have the right communications equipment and know what to do in an emergency. Knowledge of emergency radio procedures are important to ensure your broadcast is recognised as a call for help.

 

The two men on this boat could not give an accurate location to the Coastguard when they got into difficulty and this hampered efforts to find them. The Maritime and Coastguard Agency recommend using a VHF DSC radio linked to a GPS on your boat which can quickly give an accurate position in an emergency. – MCA

UK: Plymouth search for missing Desmond White (45yrs) continues – 140913 1010z

Police are growing increasingly concerned for the welfare of Desmond White.

 

(Photo: Devon & Cornwall.Police)

 

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Desmond is described as male, white, aged 45years, 5f8h tall, slim build, usually wears jeans and a T shirt.
Desmond was last seen in the Ernesettle Lane area, Ernesettle, Plymouth, near to the Vi-Spring factory on the morning of Thursday 12th September 2013.
Any person with any information regarding the whereabouts of Desmond are asked to contact Devon & Cornwall Police on 101 quoting log number 0470 120913.

 

Dartmoor Search and Rescue Team ( were called out to search the Ernesettle Lane area of Plymouth for   Desmond. 1730 last night. The search is currently on-going.

 

(Photo: Plymouth Herald) Dartmoor Search and Rescue Team)

 

(Photo: DSRT Plymouth) Dartmoor Search and Rescue Team on day two of callout)

 

Other Reports

 

Police concern for missing man, extensive search operation ongoing

 

gPolice are growing increasingly concerned for the safety of a missing Plymouth man, Desmond White.

 

Desmond is described as male, white, aged 45, 5f8h tall, of slim build, usually wearing jeans and a T-shirt.

 

Desmond was last seen in the Ernesettle Lane area, Ernesettle, Plymouth, near to the Vi-Spring factory yesterday morning, Thursday.

 

An extensive search operation for Desmond was carried out late into the night and resumed this morning.

 

(Photo: Plymouth Herald) Police at the search scene

 

Police searching for Desmond White have appealed to a ggood Samaritanh who hooked a carrier bag of snack bars on a tree branch in Ernesettle.

 

Missing person search manager, Sergeant Ryan Canning said he was hoping the member of the public could assist the police with the exact location in which the bag was found.

 

He said: gAt the time he was reported missing a carrier bag with some snack bars in it was found hooked onto a tree in the area he was last seen by the water treatment works on a footpath along Ernesettle Lane.

 

gWe believe it was probably hooked on the tree by a member of the public who thought somebody had lost the bag and has then done the good Samaritan thing picked it up and put it on a branch. We are asking for that person to come forward so we can identify exactly where the bag was found.h

 

If you know anything about the carrier bag with the snack bars in it, please contact the police by calling 101 quoting log number 0470 120913.h h – Plymouth Herald

 

See Plymouth Herald video (link)

Saturday 14 Sept 2013

Update: Search for missing Plymouth man Desmond White continues

 

“Concerns were growing last night for a missing man who has not been seen since Thursday morning.

The search for Desmond White was due to resume this morning. He disappeared after being dropped off for work on Ernesettle Lane at 7.05am on Thursday.

(Photo: Plymouth Herald) Volunteers from Dartmoor Rescue, Plymouth continue the search

Police are hoping a carrier bag with snack bars in it found hooked on to a tree could help the investigation into his disappearance, which is said to be “completely out of character”.

 

A multi-agency search began on Thursday and continued throughout yesterday until darkness fell.

(Photo: Plymouth Herald) Desmond White

 

Despite the best efforts of teams from Devon and Cornwall Police, Dartmoor Search and Rescue Plymouth, the MOD Police and assistance from the police force helicopter, Mr White remained missing last night.

 

Police searching for the 45-year-old have appealed to a “good Samaritan” who it is believed hooked a carrier bag of snack bars on to a tree branch.

 

Sergeant Ryan Canning said he was hoping the member of the public could assist the police with the exact location in which the bag was found.

 

He said: “At the time he was reported missing a carrier bag with some snack bars in it was found hooked onto a tree in the area he was last seen by the water treatment works on a footpath along Ernesettle Lane.

 

“We believe it was probably hooked on the tree by a member of the public who thought somebody had lost the bag and has then done the good Samaritan thing picked it up and put it on a branch.” – Plymouth Herald

END

Dartmoor Rescue Group


The Dartmoor Rescue Group was started in 1968 in the Tavistock area when a small group of local moorland enthusiasts started helping the police with search and rescue on Dartmoor. 

In due course a recognised official rescue team was formed which became affiliated to the Mountain Rescue Council. Currently the Group consists of four Search and Rescue Teams (SART) based in Ashburton, Okehampton, Tavistock and Plymouth. Each team is a separate charity and is capable of functioning independently. However the teams frequently operate together and so each team is part of the Dartmoor Rescue Group which is a separate charity and which co-ordinates common training, equipment and communications issues and is the main contact point for outside organisations. 

Each team will tend to work in its own geographical area but may need to work anywhere on Dartmoor to support other Dartmoor Search and Rescue teams. Depending on the number of people who require rescuing or the area to be searched, a callout may consist of one, two or three teams and usually at least one team is kept as a back up in case of an extended operation. DRG teams provide a search and rescue service in the rest of Devon and Cornwall and may be used to support the Cornwall and the Exmoor Search and Rescue teams.

UK: Peter Tatchell to be guest of honour at first ever Totnes Gay Pride (Sat, Sept 14) – 090813 1940z

By , on Wednesday, July 24, 2013

“Human rights campaigner Peter Tatchell will be the guest of honour at the first ever Totnes Pride event, which will bring south Devon’s Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual and Transgender community (LGBT) together with their friends and families for a full day and night of celebration in the town.

Devon-based LGBT organisation Proud2Be is laying on a whole host of events in the town on Saturday, September 14 in what will be the UK’s largest rural Pride event.

(Photo: crewmagazine.com) Peter Tatchell

The day kicks off at 11.30am at Totnes Civic Hall, where visitors can take part in a panel debate, workshops and talks from some leading LGBT figures from across the country, including Peter and Elly Barnes, who topped the Independent newspaper’s Pink List, the rundown of the 250 most influential people in the LGBT community.

Then the fun really kicks off at the spectacular Totnes Pride After Party from 8pm at the South Devon Arts Centre. A huge night of entertainment, dance and music features the UK’s top Burlesque group Kinky & Quirky, live music from Sound of the Sirens and Rebecca Maze, and top DJs.

Entry to the daytime events at Totnes Civic Hall is just £1 for adults, 50p for 11-18 year olds, and is free to those under 11s. Tickets to the Totnes Pride After Party are £12.50 and available from the South Devon Arts Box Office on 0844 888 0435 or online at www.southdevonarts.co.uk.

Mr Tatchell said Proud2Be’s founder Mat and Jon Price had created something really special.

“I am proud to support Proud2Be Totnes Pride 2013,” said Peter. “I’ll be there and I hope you will join me for a fabulous celebration. LGBT community makes an important, positive contribution to Totnes and Devon. Proud2Be Totnes Pride is the recognition that LGBT people are part of south Devon. We’re here, we’re queer and we love Totnes.

“There have long been LGBT Pride events in big cities like London and Bristol, but it is really important that Pride celebrations also happen in smaller towns and cities too. LGBT people are often invisible in more rural parts of the country. Their input into local communities is frequently overlooked.

“It is important to keep campaigning for LGBT acceptance and human rights in Devon and all across the UK. The battle for marriage equality is almost won but not quite. We are still campaigning for equal love rights. Our efforts are part of a worldwide movement for LGBT equality. We are part of an unstoppable global trend.”

Totnes-based Proud2Be was launched two years when gay identical twin brothers, Mat and Jon Price sat in front of their web cam and recorded a short video. In the video they explained how they are both proud to be gay.

“In truth we had been ashamed to be gay before that moment,” said Mat. “After years of messages from our school, church, the media and certain members of our family, that being gay was wrong, we had internalised those messages and started to believe them. When a friend asked us if we were proud to be gay we both said no. But that was the catalyst for our change in attitude and three years later the Proud2Be Project was born.

“Our mission is to encourage and support all lesbian, gay, bisexual & trans (LGBT) people to be proud of who they are.”

Since its launch, Proud2Be has grown hugely and now holds monthly get togethers and other events across Totnes. The organisation has also received the backing of some famous names among the LGBT community including Stephen Fry, and the twins also host there own radio show on local community station Soundart.

“Totnes Pride is going to be a wonderful day for Totnes and south Devon,” said Jon. “It will be a day when the LGBT community, as well as our friends and families, can celebrate and show everyone they’re proud of who they are. We’re delighted to have the support of so many people and organisations and just can’t wait for the day itself to come.

“We’ll have some great talks, debates and events for all ages during the day at the Civic Hall, and then we’ll really let our hair down with a huge party at the South Devon Arts Centre. It’s going to be spectacular. (from a press release) ” – peoplesrepublicofsouthdevon

VIDEO: Click if you’re glad to be gay – Stephen Fry backs Westcountry pride campaign

Exeter Express and Echo Monday, July 29, 2013

“Comedian Stephen Fry has backed a gay pride campaign based in Devon with a video message which has now gone viral.

The actor and author recorded a YouTube clip in support for the Totnes campaign Proud2Be LGBT, which has received 60,000 hits in two days.

  1. fry

    fry

He candidly tells the world how he really feels about being gay, encouraging anyone unsure of their sexuality to follow their hearts and their “glands”

“It seems funny to me to have to say that I’m proud to be gay but goodness I am…and I won’t ever apologise for being born the way I was and feeling the way I do,” he adds.

The campaign was launched two years when gay identical twin brothers, Mat and Jon Price sat in front of their web cam and recorded a short video explaining their pride. “In truth we had been ashamed to be gay before that moment,” said Mat.

“After years of messages from our school, church, the media and certain members of our family, that being gay was wrong, we had internalised those messages and started to believe them.

“When a friend asked us if we were proud to be gay we both said no. But that was the catalyst for our change in attitude and three years later the Proud2Be Project was born.” – thisisexeter.co.uk

“Proud2Be Project is set to launch it’s first rural pride event in Totnes, Devon for all local lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people and their friends, family members and supporters.

The yearly event will be held at The Civic Centre on Saturday 14th September at 11.30am and will include a live panel debate, live music, food & drinks, workshops & stalls for local community organisations and the Devon & Cornwall Police.

Sgt. Ryan Doyle from the Devon Diverse Communities Team said: “Devon and Cornwall Police are proud to support Totnes Pride as part of our commitment to the LGB&T communities in the area. We would also like to congratulate Mat and Jon Price and the Totnes Pride team for organising the day and hope that this can be established as a successful annual event”

Founded and directed by identical twin brothers Mat and Jon Price, Proud2Be has already been put forward for a Princes Trust award and a National Diversity award.

The whole thing started as the gay brothers sat in front of their web cam and told the world they are proud to be gay.

Since then a number of high profile figures have come forward and recorded similar messages, including Peter Tatchell, Deputy Speaker Nigel Evans MP, Michael Cashman MEP and of course the wonderful Stephen Fry.

Through the project, Mat and Jon will not only host the yearly pride event and run the campaign but also facilitate social groups and residentials.

With a strong and positive vision driving the project the founders said: “As gay children growing up in a small rural village we both know how isolating it can feel to be LGBT identified and have little access to those of the same community. We felt it was time to bring Pride into rural areas where LGBT people are at most risk of feeling isolated and invisible”.

The Proud2Be Project invites everyone to attend. Whether LGB or T or their friend, family member or supporter.

The Proud2Be Project is looking for volunteers to help out on the day. To find out how to get involved and to learn more about Totnes Pride or other Proud2Be services head to http://proud2beproject.org/ or email info@proud2beproject.org” – mag.bent.com

WATCH #Proud2Be founders Mat & Jon Price talk about #TotnesPride and more on @BBCSpotlight (link)

UK: Polish worker Magda Krawiec found and saved by policeman’s teenage daughter – 310513 1320z

Further appeal for Magdalena Krawiec, missing from Paignton

(Photo: thisisdevon.co.uk) Magdalena Krawiec, missing from Paignton

Police and family members are growing increasingly concerned for her welfare after she didnt turn up for work.

Police are appealing for the publics help in tracing a 20-year-old Polish woman missing from Paignton.

Magdalena Krawiec was last seen on CCTV leaving the place she was staying in Paignton at 8pm on Tuesday 14 May 2013.

Magdalena is described as 5ft 10, white European, slim build with short brown hair. She was last seen wearing a black, PVC or leather coat, dark top, grey leggings or tight fitting jeans and a black top. She was carrying a shoulder bag, which may have been green, and wearing black shoes with white socks.

Police are carrying out searches in Paignton for Magdalena and are being assisted by Dartmoor Search and Rescue and the Coastguard.

Anyone who sees her or knows of her whereabouts is asked to call police on 101, quoting log 232 of 15 May 2013. Devon & Cornwall Police

New CCTV image of Magdalena Krawiec, missing from Paignton

Associated Image

Police have released a new CCTV image showing the last known sighting of Magdalena Krawiec, the Polish woman who went missing from Paignton last week. The picture shows the 20-year-old walking along Marine Drive near the Redcliffe Hotel in Paignton in the direction of Torquay on Monday 13 May at 8.17pm.

Torquay Herald ExpressCCTV appeal in search for missing Paignton woman

DETECTIVES investigating the mysterious disappearance of Polish worker Magda Krawiec are making an urgent appeal to the community.

They are asking that any CCTV taken in the Preston and Paignton area be checked carefully for sightings of the young woman who mysteriously vanished from her guest house more than a week ago.

  1. magda2

    Magda Krawiec

The last sightings of the 20-year-old were at just after 8pm on Monday, May 13. She is recorded on the guest house CCTV at 8.01pm.

After that there was a possible sighting of her in Marine Parade.

This week divers from the police specialist search unit trawled a murky pond in the grounds of Parkfield.

Area where police divers search centred today (Photo: torquayheraldexpress)

Magdas mother, who had already planned to travel to Torbay this week, spoke to detectives on Tuesday morning. (21)

Now Det Insp Chris Yarwood has asked for businesses or private individuals who have CCTV to make sure that the equipment does not auto-delete the images.

She has been missing a long time and I dont want to speculate, Det Insp Yarwood said.

We dont think she has got a phone or any money with her and she only has the clothes she was wearing.

We are appealing for anyone with CCTV that covers the street not to allow it to self-delete.

Shops in the Preston and Paington area and even private houses that have CCTV which might have captured people walking past should save it to disc.

We are still trying to patch together her route. She went into Paignton and she just vanished. We believe we have a sighting of her very shortly after she left the guest house in Marine Parade.

Officers working on Operation Seeker carried out house-to-house inquiries around the town over the weekend, and were helped in their search by Coastguard teams and volunteers from the Dartmoor Search and Rescue organisation. ( )

The police diving team was led by Sgt Andrew Joyner. PC Lee Roberts went into the murky pond at Parkfield and systematically searched the filthy waters for more than an hour on Tuesday morning.

Police specialist search unit (Photo: torquayheraldexpress)

At a briefing at Torquay police station on Monday afternoon, Acting Superintendent Nikki Leaper said Magda arrived in Paignton during the evening of Sunday May 12, preparing to start a seasonal job at the Blue Sea Food fish processing plant in the town.

Acting Superintendent Nikki Leaper (Photo: torquayheraldexpress)

She had worked there last summer and autumn.

Magda has family and friends in Torbay, and they had made arrangements for her to stay at a local guest house.

She went to work on Monday and moved into her accommodation the same day.

However, she did not turn up for work on Tuesday morning.

At the Blue Sea Food Company, factory manager Conrad Luck said that Magda was one of the seasonal production staff.

We are concerned. Thats why it was reported last Tuesday.

For us not to hear from her is obviously distressing.

She is a very reliable person we wouldnt have called her back to work for us this season if that wasnt the case

We are quite a small company and we all know each other on first name terms.

From a work point of view Magda was very good. She always turns up on time. Shes a good worker and she is reliable.

One of her friends in Paignton who used to work here with us last summer came in to see us with another friend on Tuesday morning to ask if we had heard anything.

We advised them to report it.

The police are keeping an open-mind and throwing a lot of resources towards finding her.

But despite that we are all none the wiser.

Every day we think hopefully she will turn up but as each day goes by and still there is no news, we are getting more concerned.

Acting Superintendent Leaper said: Magda is a high-risk missing person.

We are treating her as vulnerable, largely because she is new to the country.

Officers said there had been no contact with Magda, and said her disappearance was completely out of character.

She is described as 5ft 10ins, white European, slim build with short brown hair.

She was last seen wearing grey tight-fitting leggings or jeans, a black top or T-shirt, a black PVC or leather coat and dark trousers and black shoes. She was carrying a green bag.

Anyone who sees her or knows of her whereabouts is asked to call police on 101, quoting log 232 of 15 May 2013.

Det Insp Yarwood added: We are very concerned about her and are appealing for anybody with information about her to let us know.

This is still a missing person investigation and there could be an explanation why shes gone but every day we are a bit more concerned. torquayheraldexpress

Update 31 May 2013:

Teenager “How we saved missing Magda”

EXCLUSIVE by Colleen Smith torquayheraldexpress

“The daughter of a Torbay policeman has revealed how she found and saved missing Polish worker Magda Krawiec.

The 20-year-old had been missing for 12 days when she was spotted by Megan Foster.

  1. FOUND:  Magda Krawiec and, right, Megan Foster from Paignton

    FOUND: Magda Krawiec and, right, Megan Foster from Paignton

The 18-year-old, from Preston, Paignton, recognised Magda because of her distinctive black beanie hat.

Magda remains seriously ill in hospital after apparently sleeping rough in a disused garage near Scadson Woods.

Mystery still surrounds the missing 12 days because she has been too ill to speak to police. Detectives waiting to interview Magda say it is not a criminal investigation.

Police say Magda may not have survived another night had she not been found that day. Her condition in hospital has been described as serious following 12 days sleeping rough in which she appears not to have eaten or drunk anything.

Teenager Megan revealed she recognised Magda’s photograph from Facebook. Megan, who works at Next at The Willows in Torquay, is the daughter of Des Foster, a detective with the Major Crime Investigation Team.

She said: “I keep thinking if we hadn’t found her that could have been her last day. She was so ill when we found her. She couldn’t really talk.”

She said she found Magda at about 7pm on Saturday in the All Hallows area of Preston, near Scadson Woods.

She said: “My friend was dropping me home and as we came up the hill she was just sitting on the pavement on the corner which was a bit unusual.

“I glanced down at her as we drove past and she had the black woolly hat on which she was wearing in the photo I had seen on Facebook. As she looked at me I said to my friend ‘I think it’s the Polish woman’.

“Straight away I called my dad to see if he was at home and he came out and walked over to her and showed her his police badge. She took my dad’s hand and walked up to our house. I asked her if she wanted a hand and she took my hand and I took her into the house.

“We sat her down and gave her some drink and she had a glass of water.

“She didn’t really want to be left on her own and I went and sat with her in the bathroom while mum made her a cup of tea. She looked totally puzzled and not with it. She didn’t really talk. She was absolutely freezing

“When the ambulance and police were here she was sat on the sofa with her head resting on my shoulder.

“Every now and then she gave me a slight smile and I felt so sorry for her.

“She did ask what day it was. She said ‘I have been missing a long time’. But she said she thought it was May 15, only two days after she went missing. We told her it was May 25.”

Dc Sarah Briggs said: “Des Foster’s daughter told him that she thought it was Magda. She was sitting on a towel on the pavement.

“It’s amazing that she was found.”

Supt Nikki Leaper and Det Insp Chris Yarwood both thanked the public for their response in the search for Magda, who disappeared the day after arriving in Paignton.

On the day of her disappearance she had been to her first day’s work at the Sea Food Company, where she had also worked the previous summer and autumn.

Her prolonged disappearance sparked major air and sea searches throughout the Bay.

Det Con Foster said: “I was out in the back garden when my youngest daughter drove into our close and saw the girl sitting on the pavement and saw things weren’t right.

“She looked very ill. It was quite apparent she was dehydrated and was certainly hypothermic.

“She couldn’t talk but she wrote down her name.

“If Megan hadn’t realised who she was she could easily have wandered back off into Scadson Woods and may not have been found.” ” – thisisdevon.co.uk

UK: Thousands enjoy mock medieval battle at Lostfest, Cornwall – 140513 2335z

(Photo: thisiscornwall.co.uk) Kernow Levy Medieval Battle Reenactment At Lost Fest 2013

Not even a day of rain managed to dissuade more than 3,000 people from attending a popular arts festival in Cornwall on Sunday which included a Medieval battle re-enactment for the first time.

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(Photo: thisiscornwall.co.uk) Kernow Levy Medieval Battle Reenactment At Lost Fest 2013

The seventh edition of Lostfest, which took place in Lostwithiel, also featured more than 200 bands, arts and craft stalls and was timed to coincide with the first reopening of the Duchy Palace since its 15-month refurbishment was complete in January.

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(Photo: thisiscornwall.co.uk) Kernow Levy Medieval Battle Reenactment At Lost Fest 2013

But the highlight for organisers was the inclusion for the first time of a Medieval battle by reenactment group Kernow Levy, which took place throughout the town.

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(Photo: thisiscornwall.co.uk) Kernow Levy Medieval Battle Reenactment At Lost Fest 2013

The group set up camp in the church yard and were present throughout the day, culminating in the battle, which was won by the army from Lostwithiel. Mike Dobbie, who is part of the festival’s organising committee said: “I would say the Medieval battle was the highlight.

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(Photo: thisiscornwall.co.uk) Kernow Levy Medieval Battle Reenactment At Lost Fest 2013

“It went down really, really well and it proved really popular.

“People were following them around the town, they set up in the church and put on a fantastic display.

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(Photo: thisiscornwall.co.uk) Kernow Levy Medieval Battle Reenactment At Lost Fest 2013

“But the whole festival was just great, it’s a bit of a mix, something for everyone. I would say there was something between 3,000 and 5,000 people and the Duchy Palace had something in the region of 1,000 visitors throughout the day.”

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(Photo: thisiscornwall.co.uk) Kernow Levy Medieval Battle Reenactment At Lost Fest 2013

The Duchy Palace is said to be one of the oldest non-ecclesiastical buildings in Cornwall, and was bought by the Prince’s Regeneration Trust in 2009.

About Kernow Levy

Kernow Levy is a Medieval re-enactment group, based in Cornwall, focusing primarily on the period between the years 900 to 1500.

They are a group of people who are interested in understanding history through the re-enactment of it.
They have a lot of fun not only fighting at shows all over the country with authentic weapons, but making and wearing authentic clothing, discovering what it was really like to live the lives of medieval Knights to Viking peasants.
Membership comes from all over Cornwall and Devon. “Basically we are a friendly bunch of people who love to dress up!

We are always looking for new members and some basic kit can be made available to borrow for first timers.”

To find out more go to: kernowlevy.co.uk

A flavour….

Kernow Levy – Skirmish 2, 23rd July 2011

(Video credit:incognitoworks)

UK: 2,400+ teens complete annual 2-day Ten Tors Challenge/Jubilee Challenge across Dartmoor – 120513 1700z

https://i2.wp.com/www.legendarydartmoor.co.uk/images/Tento.gif

Ten Tors and the Weather Ten Tors and the Weather (PDF,96 kB)

To view PDF documents you will need Adobe Reader.
Adobe Acrobat Reader

Good luck to all those taking part in this years event. – metoffice.gov.uk

Dartmoor Search & Rescue Team Ashburton:

Its the 53rd Ten Tors (#TenTors) challenge this weekend. 2400 teenagers aged between 14 and 19 in teams of 6 will walk a route of Ten Tors over a distance of 35, 45, or 55 miles staring at 7am on Saturday morning and finishing by 5pm on the Sunday. There are also a further 300 youngsters with physical or educational needs taking part in the Jubilee Challenge that takes place on the Saturday. Theyve been training hard and we wish all participants the very best of luck.

Its a fabulous event with a lot of hard work by the army and other organisations, including us, who help to make it happen and run smoothly.

Our volunteers look forward to it every year and will be camping out on the moor for the duration providing assistance for any participants who need our specialist help.

Our blog has some articles and videos to give you an idea of what we get involved with.

http://www.dsrtashburton.org.uk/tag/ten-tors/

You can keep up to date with the event and the progress of the teams on their respective routes via the event website.

http://events.exeter.ac.uk/tentors/

Calling the emergency services from a mobile phone (Advice from Dartmoor Rescue)

The short video gives important information about dialing the emergency services from a mobile phone in the event of an accident. It answers important questions such as:

  • whats the difference between 999 and 112?
  • How can you call when your mobile phone is showing no signal?
  • Or if somebody in your party is unconscious and theirs is the only mobile, how can you bypass the phone security to make that important call and potentially save their life?

All this and more is explained simply and clearly.

So be prepared and watch the video as it could save the life or a family member of friend.

Help Me The Secrets of using 112 on a mobile phone in an emergency/accident

You need to register your mobile phone before being able to alert the emergency services, including mountain and cave rescue, via SMS text message. This is best donebeforeyou need help. You can register by sending an SMS text message from your mobile phone as follows:

(Goaty: Suggest better to register with 112 rather than 999 why? see video, but why not both)

sms999.001 - Version 2

More information can be found at the following website:http://www.emergencysms.org.uk/

https://lh3.ggpht.com/_D_E5598eI3o/TSm5QDx_3vI/AAAAAAAACCk/aym4dYflxxg/s1600/mountainrescue.jpgGeneral Mountain/Moorland Advice from Mountain Rescue England & Wales:

Mountains and moorlands can be treacherous places without proper care and there are many, many ways to enjoy the mountain environment, be it walking, climbing, running, cycling or skiing. Theres no subsititute for experience, but there are steps you can take to minimise the chances of getting lost or hurt.

Prepare and plan

  • Develop the mountain skills you need to judge potential hazard, including the ability to read a map.
  • Think about the equipment, experience, capabilities and enthusiasm of your party members, taking into account the time of year, the terrain and the nature of the trip and choose your routes accordingly.
  • Learn the basic principles of first aid airway, breathing, circulation and the recovery position. It could make the difference between life and death.

Wear suitable clothing and footwear

  • Wear suitable footwear with a treaded sole, and which provides support for ankles.
  • Clothing should be colourful, warm, windproof and waterproof and always carry spare, including hat and gloves (even in summer the tops and open moorland can still be bitingly cold, and its always colder the higher you climb).

Carry food and drink

  • Take ample food and drink for each member of the party. High energy food such as chocolate and dried fruit are ideal for a quick hit.
  • In cold, wet weather a warm drink is advisable, and always carry water even in cool weather its easy to become dehydrated.
  • Of course, large quantities of water can weight heavy in the rucksack, so take a smaller water bottle and top up when you can streams on hills are drinkable if fast-running over stony beds.

and the right equipment

  • A map and compass are essential kit and should be easily accessible not buried in the rucksack!
  • A mobile phone and GPS are useful tools but dont rely on your mobile to get you out of trouble in may areas of the mountains there is no signal coverage.
  • Take a whistle and learn the signal for rescue. Six good long blasts. Stop for one minute. Repeat. Carry on the whistle blasts until someone reaches you and dont stop because youve heard a reply rescuers may be using your blasts as a direction finder.
  • A torch (plus spare batteries and bulbs) is a must. Use it for signalling in the same pattern as for whistle blasts.
  • At least one reliable watch in the party.
  • Cllimbers and mountain bikers should wear a helmet. In winter conditions, an ice-axe, crampons and survival bag are essential.
  • Emergency survival kit comprising spare clothing and a bivvi bag.

Before you set out

  • Charge your phone battery! Many accidents occur towards the end of the day when both you and your phone may be low on energy.
  • Check the weather forecast and local conditions. Mountains can be major undertakings and, in the winter months, night falls early.
  • Eat well before you start out.
  • Leave your route plan including start and finish points, estimated time of return and contact details with an appropriate party.

On the hill

  • Keep an eye on the weather and be prepared to turn back if conditions turn against you, even if this upsets a long planned adventure.
  • Make sure party leaders are experienced. Keep together, allow the slowest member of the party to determine the pace, and take special care of the youngest and weakest in dangerous places.
  • Watch for signs of hypothermia, particularly in bad weather disorientation, shivering, tiredness, pale complexion and loss of circulation in hands or toes, discarding of vital clothing. Children and older people are especially susceptible.
  • If you prefer to go alone, be aware of the additional risk. Let people know your route before you start, stick to it as far as you can and notify them of any changes.
  • If you think you need mountain rescue, get a message to the Police (999/112) as soon as possible and keep injured/exhausted people safe and warm until help reaches you.

Dangers you can avoid

  • Precipices and unstable boulder.
  • Slopes of ice or steep snow, and snow cornices on ridges or gully tops.
  • Very steep grass slopes, especially if frozen or wet.
  • Gullies, gorges and stream beds, and streams in spate.
  • Exceeding your experience and abilities and loss of concentration.

Dangers you need to monitor

  • Weather changes mist gale, rain and snow may be sudden and more extreme than forecast.
  • Ice on path (know how to use an ice-axe and crampons).
  • Excessive cold or heat (dress appropriately and carry spare clothing!).
  • Exhaustion (know the signs, rest and keep warm).
  • Passage of time especially true when under pressure allow extra time in winter or night time conditions.

Check out the new Safe in the Hills website pioneered by the Kirkby Stephen MRT, for more information about how you can keep safe whilst walking in the hills.

More about Ten Tors from wikipedia.org

Look after your feet, you dont want this sort of fun..

How to take care of your feet when hiking. The key recommendations are:

  • Choose the right hiking boots
  • Trim your toenails
  • Soften any tough skin (which are subject to hard to treat deep blisters)
  • Rest feet when walking

Avoiding and treating foot blisters for hikers, as well as giving some useful advice on how to treat blisters, highlights the importance of changing your (decent walking) socks when they get wet

  1. Make sure you have a decent pair of boots
  2. Take plenty of decent hiking socks
  3. Change your socks when they get damp (if you do this as early as possible you have a fighting chance to dry them in your sleeping bag)
  4. Regularly let your feet rest and breath
  5. Regularly apply talc to your feet
  6. If it is raining or very damp, wear gaiters to stop water getting into your boots

Do this and your feet, the most important hiking equipment you have, will thank you!

(Stolen from http://philsorrell.com/2010/03/01/importance-of-foot-care-whilst-hiking/)

Friday 1oth 1530BST:

High above Okehampton camp, Dartmoor the Police helicopter hovered, a birds eye view of teams starting to arrive and setting up

(Photo: @DCP_Helicopter) Okehampton camp, Dartmoor 10 May 2013

Antony Astbury, Deputy Chief Forecaster at the Met Office said yesterday: Its an unsettled picture for Dartmoor this weekend. For the Ten Tors participants the main feature will be the strong winds which will make it feel very cold. During the day on Sunday visibility will be reduced as cloud lowers over the hills

The latest forecast for Dartmoor can be found on the Met Office events page.

Latest BBC Weather forecast here:

Latest news can be found on the Event website. and mobile.tentors.org.uk (WAP)

Ten Tors Facebook page

Copied from the event website:

Fri 10-May-2013 at 14:39:44 Updated:
The camp-site is a hive of activity now. The tent-pegs are being hammered in-deep and the guy-ropes are essential against the blustery and strong wind. Although the weather forecast is for rain this evening, there is a greatsense of anticipation and the teams pass through scrutineering in their team colours.
Fri 10-May-2013 at 12:59:54 Updated:

Weather report: its blustery and overcast here at Okehampton Camp, but so far the predicted rain hasnt arrived its due this evening and overnight we could be in for a damp start tomorrowMany organisations are involved, but these are the SAR related ones:

Devon and Cornwall Constabulary work closely with the Ten Tors organisers throughout the training period and the Event. Anyone who has been lost or injured on Dartmoor will tell you of their expert coordination of rescue from Dartmoors wild country.

Dartmoor Search and Rescue Group provides twelve teams based around the Moor and controlled from Okehampton Camp during the Event; their first-hand knowledge of the Moor is a crucial part of the Ten Tors safety-net.

British Red Cross works with the Army Medical Service to provide medical cover for the participants in the Challenges, supporters and spectators. Their volunteers man the first aid point in Okehampton Camp and are ready to assess, treat and evacuate casualties. 50 volunteers are providing first aid cover

Devon and Cornwall 44 Response we never close & we always respond. The volunteers provide over thirty 44 vehicles with drivers to carry the EUOTC, Scrutineers and DRG teams together with Army fall out units for transporting participants who need to leave the route early. Snow, floods and difficult tracks are where we usually operate and in recent years our members covered over 10,000 miles carrying police, nurses, doctors, carers, and essential medical supplies.

Good luck to everyone taking part!

Goatys News can also be found onFacebook and Twitter

Goatys News May 10, 2013 at 19:25 (Edit)

10 May 2013 2020BST: Check out Jerseys upgraded doppler radar, which covers Dartmoor: http://www.jerseymet.gov.je/Radar/Radar.html

Goatys News May 10, 2013 at 20:14 (Edit)

10 May 2013 2110BST: Latest update on event website:

Fri 10-May-2013 at 19:21:17 Updated:

From the Ten Tors controllers: The event is proceeding given the assessment of the weather. We are expecting overnight rain to continue into the morning if you plan to attend the start of Ten Tors or Jubilee Challenge please wear waterproofs!

Updates will continue but the timestamp on the front page will not change overnight in preparation for the start of Ten Tors 2013 at 07:00 tomorrow. Well be here to say farewell and good luck to the four hundred Teams and to get a few photos. We wish them well!!

https://events.exeter.ac.uk/tentors/

Update 11 May 2013 1050 BST:

Latest updates copied from https://events.exeter.ac.uk/tentors/

Sat 11-May-2013 at 06:39:32 Updated:

Good Morning World Welcome to Ten Tors 2013!

After a very short night the 400 Teams are wide awake(!), breakfasted, kitted up and beginning to make their way to their assembly points at Anthony Stile for the start of Ten Tors 2013 thats exactly where were heading, to get some photos of them setting off on their journey!

Every Team will have trained throughout the winter and early spring, building up their endurance, and their knowledge of the moor for this one weekend. Each individual will carry wet and dry weather changes of kit, a sleeping bag, roll mat, food for two days, two litres of water, a map and compass As a Team of six they will carry between them at least two tents, two stoves, cooking gear and two first aid kits Armed with this they are about to take on Dartmoor, and whatever weather it might choose to bless them with over the next thirty-six hours.

This is Ten Tors weekend. Theyre ready!

Sat 11-May-2013 at 07:59:22 Updated:

It was a wet start for all the teams this morning but spirits were high as the teams set off. Despite the weather a big crowd cheered them on their way. Compass skills will be important as the teams head for their first tors because the cloud is low making visibility poor. This is when all that training comes into its own. Some teams should start to reach their first tors from 8 oclock but much depends on the route they are on. Photos of the start will be posted shortly.

(Photo: ArmyMediaCommSW ‏@ArmyMediaCommSW 11 May) And they’re off! 393 Ten Tors teams take to the hills watched over by the Army-led multi-agency Ten Tors Ops Room

Sat 11-May-2013 at 08:29:25 Updated:

Some teams have now reached their first tor so if you want to follow their progress the following will be helpful How to Find Your Team a quick guide to Team Codes: The best place to start is the all the Teams page. This has every Team listed in alphabetic order, so finding the one(s) youre interested in should be straightforward. This site doesnt have access to the names of team members, so Im afraid we cant help there. The all Teams list has, at the start of each line, the Teams unique identifier throughout the Event (this is the entry in the Code column and is completely different from the three-character identifier they used during training consisting of one alphabetic and four numeric characters, eg C0312) each Team member literally wears these numbers for two days click on the alphabetic character to see the Route card which will detail the Teams times at each of their Tor checkpoints as the weekend progresses. If youll be using the Team Status tracking page to follow your Team across the Moor, this code will save you typing their full name. The web site is now in full Event mode the Route cards are also accessible from The Routes link on the index frame opposite; click there, select the distance your Team is walking, then your Teams alphabetic Route letter (A to Z). The Route cards, together with the all Teams and Team Update lists will be updated every ten minutes or so throughout the weekend, and theyre all time-stamped so youll know how recently they were updated but bear in mind that even on the shorter 35-mile routes theres on average 5 Km between Tor checkpoints, and on Dartmoor that could take a couple of hours to walk If youll be using your mobile phone, the data there will be derived as you request it from the All Teams page youll get the latest information available.

(Photo: ArmyMediaCommSW @ArmyMediaCommSW/Andy Reddy ) The teenagers were in teams of six and trekked up to 55 miles (89km)

The View From Here: Ten Tors, One Spirit

(Video credit: James Littlejohns)

Published on 3 May 2013

Westcountry TV documentary following 4 Ten Tors teams. Circa 1998/1999.

Hundreds of teenagers start Dartmoors Ten Tors Challenge

BBC

Related Stories

More than 2,400 teenagers have set off on the annual two-day Ten Tors Challenge across Dartmoor.

The event involves young people aged between 14 and 19, in teams of six, trekking up to 55 miles (89km).

Camping overnight, the teams complete the challenge without adult guidance and set off at 07:00 BST.

Organisers said the teenagers would arrive back at base from 09:00 BST on Sunday.

Almost 300 youngsters with special physical or educational needs will also take part in the Jubilee Challenge, completing routes of up to 15 miles (24km).

Troops involved in the event include members of the Army, the Territorial Army and the Royal Navy.

The majority of the teams who enter are from schools and youth groups from across the south-west of England.

Update 12 May 2013 1050 BST:

Dartmoor’s Ten Tors: Teenagers complete challenge

BBC

Teenagers starting the challenge Hundreds of teenagers started the challenge on Saturday morning

Related Stories

Teenagers taking part in the annual two-day Ten Tors challenge across Dartmoor in Devon have started to cross the finish line.

The event involves young people aged between 14 and 19, in teams of six, trekking up to 55 miles (89km).

Camping overnight, the teams complete the challenge without adult guidance.

The first team to cross the finish line at about 09:30 BST was the Queen Elizabeth’s Hospital School for Boys, from Bristol.

Msg from Dir Ten Tors Brigadier Piers Hankinson. ‘Soundbite’ here:

(Photo: ArmyMediaCommSW @ArmyMediaCommSW/Andy Reddy ) The first team to cross the finish line at about 09:30 BST was the Queen Elizabeth’s Hospital School for Boys, from Bristol.

Troops involved in the event include members of the Army, the Territorial Army and the Royal Navy.

More than 2,400 teenagers are taking part in the challenge, with the majority from schools and youth groups in the south-west of England.

END

(Photo: ArmyMediaCommSW @ArmyMediaCommSW ) @RoyalNavy Lynx Mark 8 from 815 Naval Air Sqdn

Commando Helicopter Force Sea King (yes, it is Lynx above) Pilot from RNAS Yeovilton on working @ Army ‘soundbite’:
The first Team was spotted walking down the final slope to the Finish at 09:34:37

The Director of Ten Tors wishes to clarify the situation regarding the delays experienced by some teams yesterday.

As the weather deteriorated over the moor during the course of the morning, there was a noticeable rise in river levels which, in places, became potentially dangerous. This situation was particularly evident on the crossing points over the Amicombe Brook, East Dart River and Sandy Hole Pass.

Therefore, the Dartmoor Rescue Group on site made a decision to offer teams an alternative, less hazardous route which involved a 4km detour. Delays were also experienced due to the congestion which then built up at these crossing points. This decision was a pragmatic suggestion by DRG leaving team leaders to decide on their choice of route. As it was not directed in advance by the Ten Tors Committee, no time allowances will be made. As much as the Ten Tors Director would like to keep the challenge open for longer, the context of the delay represents part of the challenge. Consideration must also be given to the deteriorating weather conditions expected later today and the safety implications this may bring. Here’s a ‘soundbite’ from the Director via the Army:

Chairman explains working with the at and the vital role they play. ‘Soundbite’ here:

Due the weather car parking was reduced at Okehampton Camp.

(Photo: ArmyMediaCommSW ‏@ArmyMediaCommSW) Army working hard to manage traffic in & out of muddy car parks at Okehampton Camp. Devon 4×4 & Reservists helping supporters

(Photo: ArmyMediaCommSW ‏@ArmyMediaCommSW) @BritishArmy Reservists help free Ten Tors spectators from car parks at Okehampton Camp. Thanks for your patience

About an hour ago BBC’s Matt Woodley ‏tweeted that there was a queue for ten tors supporters picking up down station road, through Okehampton town centre and backed up Exeter Rd towards the A30. He estimated 2 miles.

About 1340 BST The Army said that 89 of 393 teams which started have now finished. There were 411 fall outs.

Dartmoor’s Ten Tors: Teenagers complete challenge

BBC

(Photo: BBC News)

Teenagers taking part in the annual two-day Ten Tors challenge across Dartmoor in Devon have crossed the finish line.

The event involves young people aged between 14 and 19, in teams of six, trekking up to 55 miles (89km).

Camping overnight, the teams complete the challenge without adult guidance.

The first team to cross the finish line at about 09:30 BST was the Queen Elizabeth’s Hospital School for Boys, from Bristol.

BlistersHector Leach-Clay, 16, who was the leader of the team, said: “It feels absolutely incredible. I feel very, very sore but very, very happy.

“My feet are the worst. I think I must have at least eight or nine blisters.

“It was really, really hard, especially at the beginning of the first tor in driving rain – persistent for about two hours with the side winds – it was awful.”

Fen Eastaugh, from Devon, was a member of Dartmoor Plodders, the first all-girls team to finish.

‘Tough conditions’The 15-year-old, who walked a 35-mile route, said: “I cannot even explain the emotions that you go through.

“There’s happiness and then you want to cry…there’s everything, it’s amazing.

“To be the first girl team…that’s what I was aiming for yesterday but I am so glad we did it, it’s just incredible.”

Brigadier Piers Hankinson, director of Ten Tors, said: “It’s been really tough conditions this year.

“A lot of teams got disorientated early on.

“It’s not a race, it’s a challenge and the conditions out there have been very challenging.”

Event organisers said more than 400 teenagers had dropped out of the event after starting on Saturday.

Troops involved in the challenge include members of the Army, the Territorial Army and the Royal Navy.

More than 2,400 teenagers took part in the challenge, with the majority from schools and youth groups in the south-west of England.

END

109 of 393 teams have now made it safely back to Okehampton camp (2 hrs ago) – Army

1736 BST: Total fallouts 526. Well done to everyone. Very hard conditions for past few hours. – Army 

2nd International Space Apps Challenge at Exeter

Official blog of the Met Office news team

Over the weekend, the Met Office hosted the NASA led International Space Apps Challenge. Months of planning and challenge selection culminated in a global event with over 480 organisations and more than 9,000 people taking part in 83 cities.The Met Office hosted events at the Met Office headquarters in Exeter and Google Campus in London, which saw over 150 participants work on challenges using open data.

Teams at the event in Exeter participated in a number of challenges including the Arduhack challenge which looked at extending the functionality of the ArduSat with a Raspberry Pi computer and steerable web camera to send images of the Earth to mobile phones.

The judges were extremely impressed by the collaboration of the teams and the progress made on all of the challenges. The two winning solutions, decided by a panel of judges from, Mubaloo, Dundee University and Tangerine Bee, were WebRover1 and Arduhack. These will now be judged…

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UK: Missing teenager Caitlin Andrew is found safe and well – 160413 1205z

 

The family of a missing 14-year-old girl from Weston are continuing to appeal for information about her whereabouts. – See below FOUND

Caitlin Andrew was last seen at her home address in Pembroke Close, Bournville at 7.30am on Sunday.

Her family are continuing to appeal for information via a Facebook page Help Find Caitlin Andrew.

The page has received more than 5,000 Likes since being set up yesterday.

An Avon and Somerset Constabulary spokesperson said: We are continuing to conduct enquiries to identify a missing 14-year-old girl from Weston-super-Mare. Anyone who has seen her since she went missing should contact police on 101.

Caitlin, who is 5ft 1ins tall and has long dyed black hair, was last seen wearing grey jogging bottoms.

Her mother said she has not taken her phone, purse, handbag or clothes. She is believed to have been alone.

Her family says she could be anywhere in the Cornwall, Devon, Bristol or Exeter areas.

Members of Caitlins family have posted messages on the Facebook page: Still no news unfortunately everyone. Still concentrating on the Exeter and surrounding areas so please keep an eye out let hope today is the day again many thanks for your support but please help myself and Claire Andrew keep our inboxes for information only many many thank with your continued support xxxxxx.

A message posted yesterday read: Caitlin,Please Come Home,You Are Not In Any Trouble,Everyone Is Worried SickPlease Contact Someone Just To Let Them Know You Are Ok xxxx.

Anyone with information is urged to contact the police on 101.

Update 17 April 2013:

“A 14-year-old girl who went missing from Weston earlier this week – prompting an appeal for people in the Burnham area to look out for her – has been found safe and well.

Caitlin Andrew had not been seen at her home address in Bournville, Weston since early on Sunday, leaving her family worried about her welfare.

But she was found safe and well on Tuesday, police said.

A member of her family posted on Facebook: “Just like to say Caitlin is back with her family now. Thank you so much for your support. Our families cannot thanks you enough for your support time and effort for bring her home.” “- burnham-on-sea.com

RNLI For those in peril on the sea: Salcombe lifeboat veterans recall the day when they launched to aid divers in distress in horrendous conditions…100413 1730z

For those in peril on the sea….

The former Salcombe RNLI lifeboat The Baltic Exchange that capsized (Photo: RNLI)

The former Salcombe RNLI lifeboat The Baltic Exchange that capsized (Photo: RNLI)

THIRTY years ago today, the crew of the Salcombe RNLI all-weather lifeboat launched to assist divers in trouble

Little did they know that the day would take a dramatic turn with a crew volunteer going overboard and the Watson class lifeboat capsizing in enormous seas.

Former crew volunteer Roger Evans

Frank Smith

 Former crew volunteer Mike Hicks
Former crew volunteer David Lamble

All pictures RNLI/Nathan Williams

No-one lost their life despite the incident and last weekend the four crew who are still alive today, met for a special reunion at the charitys RNLI College in Poole, Dorset.

The Salcombe RNLI crew were called around lunchtime on 10 April 1983 to assist a group of divers who were reported to be in difficulties their inflatable dinghy had capsized on the Skerries Bank.

As the lifeboat left the harbour it became apparent to the seven lifeboat crew that the conditions were horrendous with ferocious force nine winds and big seas.

Among those who put to sea were Frank Smith, now 66 and at the time the Motor Mechanic at Salcombe lifeboat station and crew volunteers Mike Hicks, also 66, and then a local restaurateur, Roger Evans, 70 now and then an Audiologist and David Whale Lamble, the youngest crew member at the time aged just 24 and a fisherman.

 

The seas had built alarmingly on the day and in the midst of the passage Mike Hicks was washed overboard by a huge wave. Frank Smith takes up the story from his perspective;

 

As we turned to go back for Mike the lifeboat started to roll over to starboard. She just had the momentum to carry on. I thought to myself, I dont like this and then I thought shes going. I remember it all going black and then we were upside down and trapped below, everything was the wrong way round. I remember it went very still and I hadnt a clue where we were. Then I saw a clump of light the size of my fist on the door and that was her coming back up again.

 

When she was back up we turned round to collect Mike out of the water and that meant turning in to the very weather that had just capsized us.

 

For Mike Hicks it was a very different story as he recalls with emotion:

 

I unhooked my safety line to let someone go by and as I did that a wall of water appeared and I was gone. Then I was going down into the water and I could see two cameos of my sons and I thought what are you doing down here, lets go up. As I hit the surface I noticed my watch was undone. I fastened it and looked over and thats when I saw the lifeboat upside down and with the propellers still turning. I felt terrible emotion because all my mates were possibly lost. Then I saw the lifeboat come back over.

 

I was looking up at walls of water and then I saw the lifeboat coming towards me, but it got picked up on a wave and then it crashed down in to a trough. Theres a scramble net on the starboard side so on the next run they dropped it down and I came up on a wave and grabbed it and then my crew colleagues managed to pull me onboard.

 

David Whale Lamble who was the youngest crew volunteer that day, says their RNLI training paid off, it was they all agree a text book capsize, but he wouldnt want to experience it again;

 

People often ask me what it was like. I say it was a good experience but one that you would never wish on anyone else or yourself for that matter.

 

There were four divers in trouble that day. Two managed to get safely ashore in an inflatable dinghy, while the other two were airlifted from the sea by a search and rescue helicopter crew.

 

Following the incident a Framed Letter of Thanks signed by the then RNLI Chairman the Duke of Atholl was awarded to the Coxswain and crew in recognition of their fortitude and determination in the highest traditions of the Institution. The Salcombe RNLI team included Coxswain Graham Griffiths, Brian Horse Cater, Frank Smith, Stan Turns, Roger Evans, Mike Hicks and David Whale Lamble.

 

As designed, the emergency air bag fitted to the 47 foot Watson, had inflated as the lifeboat heeled over beyond the point of no return and initiated her righting. The Baltic Exchange suffered minimal damage but was taken off service for a complete survey and refit following the capsize. Frank Smith recalls that when he took her on trials after the overhaul he found signs attached to most bits of equipment reading this way up.

 

Frank Smith is retired and lives in Salcombe, David Lamble lives near Plymouth and is still a fisherman; Mike Hicks now lives in Brittany and Roger Evans in Scotland.” – http://www.thisissouthdevon.co.uk

Related:

It is 190 years since Sir William Hillary asked the nation to lend our utmost aid to those in trouble at sea.

It was an impassioned appeal to the nation, calling for a service dedicated to saving lives at sea, that ultimately led to the formation of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution.

Help those in peril on the sea: RNLI founder’s call still resonates

What drives postmen, engineers and teachers to put their own lives at risk to save those in peril on the sea?

RNLI: What drives these volunteers to put their own lives at risk?

An account of the incredible history of Irish lifeboats, and the even more incredible men and women who are respond in the case of disaster.

For Those In Peril on the Sea

 

Lifeboats

Key facts about the RNLI

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution is the charity that saves lives at sea. Our volunteers provide a 24-hour search and rescue service in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland from 236 lifeboat stations, including four along the River Thames and inland lifeboat stations at Loch Ness, Lough Derg, Enniskillen and Lough Ree. Additionally the RNLI has more than 1,000 lifeguards on over 180 beaches around the UK and operates a specialist flood rescue team, which can respond anywhere across the UK and Ireland when inland flooding puts lives at risk.

The RNLI relies on public donations and legacies to maintain its rescue service. As a charity it is separate from, but works alongside, government-controlled and funded coastguard services. Since the RNLI was founded in 1824 our lifeboat crews and lifeguards have saved at least 140,000 lives. Volunteers make up 95% of the charity, including 4,600 volunteer lifeboat crew members and 3,000 volunteer shore crew. Additionally, tens of thousands of other dedicated volunteers raise funds and awareness, give safety advice, and help in our museums, shops and offices.

Learn more about the RNLI

For more information please visit the RNLI website or Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. News releases, videos and photos are available on the News Centre.

Contacting the RNLI – public enquiries

Members of the public may contact the RNLI on 0845 122 6999 or by email.

The RNLI is a charity registered in England and Wales (209603) and Scotland (SC037736). Charity number CHY 2678 in the Republic of Ireland

On the BBC – Thrilling real-life drama is business as usual for RAF Search and Rescue

Update 08 Mar 2013:

BBC One Wales Today 20:30 BST

Helicopter Rescue

Series profiling the work of Wales’s RAF Search and Rescue crews

Image for Helicopter Rescue

This programme is not currently available on BBC iPlayer

Next on

Series 2 Episode 1

1/4 Flt Lt Wales flies a Sea King to rescue a boy injured in a quarry in Blaenau Ffestiniog.

Today 20:30 BBC One Wales, Wales HD only

See all upcoming broadcasts of Helicopter Rescue

RAF Families Federation

WILLIAMA new series of Helicopter Rescue lands on BBC One Wales on 8 April and viewers will be able to experience the drama and suspense of thrilling rescue footage featuring… More information

View original post

Devon: Dartmouth lifeboat in night search after man followed dog into River Dart – 020413 1645z

(Video credit: officialrnli)

“A man who went to rescue his dog from the River Dart had to be rescued himself tonight after he followed his dog in to the water.

At just before 9pm Brixham Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre received a 999 call from a member of the public at Noss Marina near Kingswear. They reported that they could hear someone shouting for help.

Brixham Coastguard sent Berry Head and Dartmouth Coastguard Rescue Teams and the RNLI lifeboat from Dartmouth to the scene. Whilst they were on their way another sailor, who had also heard the calls for help, pulled the man from the water.

It transpired that a couple had been travelling to their moored converted trawler in a small boat from a trip ashore. During the journey back to the boat the couple’s dog had jumped in to the water and he went in to the water after it.

Unfortunately the small boat was then out of control and the woman was swept to the shoreline were she was found by the lifeboat.

The calls for help had come from the woman on board the small boat. The man has been taken to hospital for treatment. The woman and dog are both safe and well.

Brixham Coastguard Watch Officer Matthew Thornhill said:
“Dogs are much better swimmers than humans. If your dog jumps in to the sea do not attempt to rescue it. This is because, like tonight, you are likely to get in to difficulty. If you do call 999 and ask for the coastguard.

“The water temperature is very cold at the moment so this man was lucky that the calls for help were heard and he was quickly pulled from the water. The cold can put your body in to shock. To give yourself the best possible chance of rescue recreational sailors and motorboaters should wear lifejackets at all times whilst on deck. These should be well maintained and should have a sprayhood, light and whistle if possible. Your lifejacket should have a crotch strap and you should use it.

“We believe that the man had been enjoying the Bank Holiday. The sea and alcohol do not mix. We advise against setting to sea if you have been or are drinking alcohol. If you have been drinking, your judgement will be impaired and you will be more likely to make mistakes, which at sea could be life threatening. Alcohol plays a contributory factor in a significant number of maritime deaths every year. “” – MCA

Devon: Paddle steamer ‘Kingswear Castle’ (Built 1924) back in Dartmouth to provide service for tourists on River Dart – 300313 2215z

(Video above: Paddle steamer Kingswear Castle on pre running trials on the river Dart early February 2013 Credit rawfish111AOR)

(Video above: Kingswear Castle paddle steamer in Totnes. Credit 0668ant)

(Photo: dartmouthrailriver.co.uk) Kingswear Castle back on the Dart 13 Mar 2013

“The paddle steamer Kingswear Castle has come back to Dartmouth to provide a service for tourists on the River Dart. She returned in December last year and from Easter will be used to provide river cruises between Dartmouth and Exeter.during weekends.

Kingswear Castle previously provided a service between Totnes, Kingswear and Dartmouth from the mid-1920s to the 1960s. She then became a tourist boat on the Thames and Medway.

The vessel was originally built in 1924 by Philip & Son’s of Dartmouth, using engines from a ship of the same name which had been constructed in 1904. She was acquired by the Paddle Steamer Preservation Society (PSPS) in 1967.” – thisisdevon.co.uk

(Photo: theviewfromthedartmouthoffice.com) 29 March 2013 10:53 AM The rivers new baby – nearly 100 years old. Well much of her engine is 100 years old – and the rest is heading for a very youthful 90 years old. A wonderful sight here on the River Dart. So you have no excuses now – get on down to Dartmouth and Kingswear and see the beautiful old girl in action. This is her very first fare paying outing raising fund for the Paddle Steamer Preservation Society.

Paddle Steamer Preservation Society

Steamtube

From the company’s website:

PADDLE STEAMER KINGSWEAR CASTLE

History

The coal-fired paddle steamer KINGSWEAR CASTLE was built in 1924 by Philip & Son of Dartmouth and sailed up and down the River Dart with her virtually identical sister ships TOTNES CASTLE and COMPTON CASTLE until the 1960s. When built, her steam engine, built by Cox and Co of Falmouth, and many fixtures and fitting were taken from her predecessor of the same name.

 

Compton Castle

Totnes Castle with larger foredeck gates for loading five cars

During the Second World War, Kingswear Castle was chartered to the American Navy for use carrying stores and personnel at Dartmouth and was one of the few British ships to retain her bright peacetime colour scheme amongst the drab uniformity of wartime grey.

Kingswear Castle in Old Mill Creek with Totnes Castle alongside

Withdrawn from service in 1965, Kingswear Castle was laid up in Old Mill Creek at Dartmouth until bought by the Paddle Steamer Preservation Society in 1967. She was moved to Binfield on the Isle of Wight where she steamed on a couple of occasions for a BBC film with John Betjeman and then, in 1971, was towed to the River Medway in Kent where restoration commenced. Many companies, individuals and other organisations donated money, equipment and expertise until finally, in 1985, she was returned to service on the River Medway with full Department of Transport (later MCA) Passenger Certificates.

 

In 1986 Kingswear Castle won the National Steam Heritage Award and in 1995 won first prize in the Scania Transport Trust Awards. In 1999 she was included on the National Historic Ships Committee Core Collection list of ships of “Pre-eminent National Significance”.

Since her return to service, Kingswear Castle has carried more than 200,000 passengers on a variety of different excursions from her base at Chatham and Rochester and on the Thames. She has also been in much demand for television and other filming and has recently starred in the BBC production of Charles Dickens’ Great Expectations and an entertaining programme about deck chairs with Vanessa Feltz.

Other distinguished passengers carried over the years include:

Sir Harry Secombe

Eric Idle and Pierce Brosnan

Prince Edward

There are two saloons below deck

as well as distinctive lavatories

So, why not join Kingwear Castle for a cruise on the River Dart and sail back into history aboard a real and historic paddle steamer from another age.

Enquiries & Bookings for 2013 on the River Dart

Thatched cottage fire at Horns Cross, near Bideford, N Devon – Couple woke by cat – 070213 1655z

In the early hours of this morning a couple lost their home to fire. The property was a thatched cottage in North Devon. Maxine Wilcox, 68, was awoken by her cat at about 4.00am when she noticed that their thatched roof was alight. The couple immediately left the property and called Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue Service.

(Photo: northdevongazette.co.uk) Up to 80 firefighters from all over North, East and West Devon have been battling a fire at a thatched cottage at Horns Cross, near Bideford, this morning (Thursday).

Mr and Mrs Wilcox waited outside while firefighters tackled the blaze and salvaged as much of their belongings as they could. A total of 15 fire appliances attended the incident.

The roof was completely destroyed by fire, with the first floor being severely damaged and the ground floor slightly damaged by fire. All the property is now water damaged. Working smoke alarms were fitted in the property. The fire was accidental, and further investigation of the chimney needs to take place along with the insurance investigators.

Jeff Harding, Incident Commander, said: The fire was in the roof, over two houses with a shared roof space. We knew it was in the roof and we knew we could not tackle it at that point because if we tried we would have lost the building.

Our focus was on moving the personal belongings of the occupier while trying to stop the fire spreading into the extensions either side of the thatched property.

I am really proud of what the crews here have done and how hard they have worked to save the extensions and as many belongings as possible.

The British Red Cross were wonderful as before they arrived the couple just had to sit in their car watching their home burning. We were looking after them, but with the arrival of the British Red Cross they were moved away from the scene to be in the warm with a cup of tea and be supported.

Volunteers from the British Red Cross fire and emergency support service were requested by the fire service to look after the welfare of Mr and Mrs Wilcox while they focused on tackling the blaze.

Maxine said: It has been such a shock this morning. As soon as we realised what was happening we got out of the cottage and called the fire brigade. Im just glad the cat woke me up.

It was absolutely freezing outside so it was nice to be able to get into the Red Cross vehicle said Maxine. It was lovely and warm and the chaps made us a cup of coffee. Both Keith and Nathan are very friendly and chatty and they have been able to put us at ease. I really appreciate and admire them very much. The Red Cross do such a brilliant job they really are wonderful.

Keith, who has been a volunteer with the Red Cross FESS service since it launched ten years ago, said: The fire service have done a fantastic job here this morning. They have been able to salvage probably 95% of the couples belonging. Obviously Mr and Mrs Wilcox are very upset and shocked, but they are both safe and well, which is the most important thing.

Thatch roofs
Devon & Somerset Fire & Rescue Service remind owners of thatched properties to regularly check their chimneys. Fire in thatch is not an inevitable occurrence but it is an organic material, subject to different behaviour patterns depending on its surroundings, treatments and choice of materials or styles. It has a finite life span, measured in tens rather than hundreds of years. And above all it is combustible

Fire in a thatched roof is difficult to detect and once started is almost impossible to control as it will spread rapidly, due to the very nature of how thatch burns and detection is often too late and invariably devastating!

A thatched home can be ruined not only by the fire but by the amount of water needed to put it out, within an ancient cottage water can dissolve old cobb walls as well as causing serious water damage throughout.

Sweep your chimney
It is vital that chimneys are regularly swept. Regular inspection and cleaning of chimney flues will help prevent fires, we recommend the following:
¢solid fuel appliances – once a year for smokeless fuel and twice a year for coal
¢wood burning appliances – every three months when in use, note that soot builds up rapidly from wood fires; avoid using wet or unseasoned wood
¢gas appliances – once a year if designed for sweeping
¢oil appliances – once a year

Smoke alarms
Smoke alarms are the easiest way to alert you to the danger of fire, giving you precious time to escape. They are cheap, easy to get hold of and easy to fit.

In a thatched property smoke alarms need be fitted in the roof space and linked to the others in your home. A fire in the roof space will be detected and the warning will be given throughout the house, not having sufficient fire alarms means you are more than twice as likely to die in a fire at home.

How do you look after smoke alarms?
Devon & Somerset Fire & Rescue Service advises you to:
¢Once a year Change your battery or consider buying a ten-year alarm which will not require frequent battery changes.
¢Regularly Check the alarm by pressing the button
¢Once a year - Vacuum and wipe the smoke alarm casing to ensure dust isnt blocking the sensor chamber (For mains wired alarms, switch off first).

Contacts

National Society of Master Thatchers contact details
www.nsmtltd.co.uk telephone 01844 281208

To find a certified Chimney Sweep, or for more information on chimney fire safety, please visit www.guild-of-master-sweeps.co.uk or www.nacs.org.uk.

News Reports

Horns Cross blaze couple ‘awoken by cat’

North Devon Gazette Thursday, February 7, 2013
11:52 AM

Up to 80 firefighters from all over North, East and West Devon have been battling a fire at a thatched cottage at Horns Cross, near Bideford, this morning (Thursday).Up to 80 firefighters from all over North, East and West Devon have been battling a fire at a thatched cottage at Horns Cross, near Bideford, this morning (Thursday).

“A COUPLE have escaped a fire at a thatched cottage after being woken up by their cat.

Maxine Wilcox, 68, said she was awoken by the animal at about 4am when she noticed flames engulfing the roof of her thatched cottage at Horns Cross, near Bideford, earlier this morning (Thursday).

Mrs Wilcox and husband Jim managed to flee the property and raise the alarm, sparking a response from 15 fire crews from as far afield as Ilfracombe and Honiton.

Around 80 firefighters from all over the county have spent hours fighting the fire on the A39, around a mile from The Hoops Inn and Country House Hotel. The fire is now under control and crews say ‘steady progress’ is being made.

Up to 80 firefighters from all over North, East and West Devon have been battling a fire at a thatched cottage at Horns Cross, near Bideford, this morning (Thursday).Up to 80 firefighters from all over North, East and West Devon have been battling a fire at a thatched cottage at Horns Cross, near Bideford, this morning (Thursday).

Mrs Wilcox said: “It has been such a shock this morning. As soon as we realised what was happening we got out of the cottage and called the fire brigade. I’m just glad the cat woke me up.”

The couple are currently being supported by volunteers from the British Red Cross fire and emergency support service (FESS), who were among the first on the scene after being called on by fire crews.

Mr and Mrs Wilcox waited outside while firefighters tackled the blaze and salvaged as much of their belongings as they could.

“It was absolutely freezing outside so it was nice to be able to get into the Red Cross vehicle” said Mrs Wilcox.

Up to 80 firefighters from all over North, East and West Devon have been battling a fire at a thatched cottage at Horns Cross, near Bideford, this morning (Thursday).Up to 80 firefighters from all over North, East and West Devon have been battling a fire at a thatched cottage at Horns Cross, near Bideford, this morning (Thursday).

“It was lovely and warm and the chaps made us a cup of coffee. Both Keith and Nathan are very friendly and chatty and they have been able to put us at ease.

“I really appreciate and admire them very much. The Red Cross do such a brilliant job – they really are wonderful.”

Volunteers, Keith Finch and Nathan Dale responded to the call in a customised Red Cross vehicle complete with a shower, cooker, kettle and emergency supplies, to provide immediate care, refreshments, advice and a sympathetic ear to the couple.

Keith, who has been a volunteer with the Red Cross FESS service since it launched ten years ago, said: “The fire service are doing a fantastic job here this morning.

“They have been able to salvage probably 95 per cent of the couple’s belonging. Obviously Mr and Mrs Wilcox are very upset and shocked, but they are both safe and well, which is the important thing.”

Mike Burroughs, fire protection support officer from Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue Service, said:

“The Red Cross volunteers provide an invaluable service to people at a time of great emotional need and stress.

When they are looking after the families, it means the firefighters have one less factor to consider.”

The 24 hour, 365 day a year service, which operates from Plymouth, covers the whole of Devon.

Red Cross FESS co-ordinator Malcolm Cook said:

“Our volunteers make a real difference to people who may have lost everything at the moment they are needed the most.

We are always looking for new volunteers based in the Plymouth area, so if anyone is interested in learning more about the service please contact the Red Cross.”

For people who want to find out more about the role and the training provided, contact Malcolm Cook on 07710 733229 or email mcook@redcross.org.uk” – Andy Keeble North Devon Gazette

Dartmoor Rescue Group rescue teen trapped in snow for 3 hours after sledging accident at Yartor Down near Dartmeet – 240113 0830z

side view of landrover with control vehicle behind

(Photo: Dartmoor Rescue Group)

Dartmoor Rescue were called to assist Westcountry Ambulance Trust with a lower leg injury on the moor at Yartor Down near Dartmeet at 6:30pm yesterday evening (23rd January).
The team arrived through some very snowy country to assist with a young female sledger with a suspected fractured leg. It had been snowing on and off during the day and when our volunteers arrived the moor was covered in a thick carpet of snow with more falling and a dense hill fog.

Once the casualtys location was ascertained she was attended to by team doctor and nurse as well as the paramedic. Her injury was stabilised and then she was transferred on to our stretcher and transported back to the waiting ambulance.

A successful result and DRG wish the young lady a speedy recovery.

Source: http://www.dsrtashburton.org.uk/callout20130123/

https://i2.wp.com/www.dartmoorcam.co.uk/CAM/previouswalks/2009-2-18_Dartmeet/dartmeet-map.jpg

(Image: dartmoorcam.co.uk)

Press Reports:

Dartmoor sledge crash teenager trapped in snow

BBC NEWS 24 January 2013 Last updated at 07:44

Rescue of teenager from Dartmoor The teenage girl was located on a steep slope and taken to hospital for treatment

A teenager became trapped in snow for three hours after injuring herself in a sledging accident in Devon.

The 18-year-old, from Paignton, was with friends near Poundsgate, Dartmoor when she hurt her ankle on Wednesday. She is recovering in hospital.

Dartmoor Rescue Group who rescued her said she was “Okay, very cold and a little hypothermic”.

The Met Office has issued a yellow warning for ice in the county which will be reviewed at 11:00 GMT.

Dave Tutty, from the rescue group, said: “The situation was getting worse, the snow was getting bad but eventually we found the girl on a steep slope.

“We were able to get her on a stretcher back up to the control vehicle.”

Devon and Somerset Fire Authority to decide on proposals to meet Government grant cut of £8m by 2015 – 020713 1750z

 

Devon & Somerset Fire & Rescue Authority members will consider a consultation report and vote on proposals to meet a significant Government grant reduction, on 10 July at the Service Headquarters in Exeter.

The Service is looking atmanaging significant on-going budget cuts, now anticipated to be around 8m by 2015, following the Spending Review announcement last week.

 

Proposals aimed at providing an affordable and effective service, without removing fire stations, fire engines or making compulsory redundancies, were developed for public consultation earlier this year. The consultation closed in April.

 

Proposals included:

 

Increasing the Services work in the community to prevent fires
Changing the way some fire engines are crewed, by providing 24 hour emergency response with on- call Firefighters

 

The Service is also reducing support staff numbers and this year alone plans to reduce numbers by around 40 posts (13% of the total) through a combination of deleting vacancies, ending some fixed term contracts and voluntary redundancy.

 

In addition, senior posts have also been reduced. From 2010, the Chief Fire Officer has reduced the Senior Management Board from nine Directors to four.

 

Chief Fire Officer Lee Howell said:

 

The savings we need to make are significant, and following the Spending Review announcement last week and Sir Ken Knights review of efficiencies in Fire and Rescue Services, we are clearer about the level of further reductions in the near future. We have made savings already by looking at how we do things more efficiently as an organisation. We dont have the option of staying as we are – we need to make changes in order to maintain a sustainable and effective service to the community.

 

The proposals being considered do not require closure of fire stations, removal of fire engines or at this stage compulsory redundancies. We do however need to live within our means and whilst I would rather not be taking out this amount of money from the Service, in reality we dont have any control over the funding allocated to us by Government. I, and the Chairman, will continue to lobby Government to ensure a fairer settlement for the future but we have to face the reality of today.

 

The meeting will be held on the 10 July 2013 from 10.00am at the Service Headquarters in Clyst St. George, Exeter, and is open to the press and public. The meeting agenda and papers, including the consultation report, can be found on the website; www.dsfire.gov.uk.

 

Additional information

 

Link to the agenda papers:

 

http://www.dsfire.gov.uk/FireAuthority/CalendarOfMeetings/documents/DSFRA10July13Agendaandpapers.pdf

 

Proposals in brief:

 

The proposed changes are:

 

Proposal 1

 

Extend the roll out of light rescue pumps which was consulted on, and agreed, last year. These vehicles reduce cost and improve performance.

 

Proposal 2

 

Implement the changes in how we will respond to automatic fire alarms (98% of which are false alarms) so that we only respond to high risk buildings automatically. This was consulted on and received public support last year. We now plan to further implement this change.

 

Proposal 3

 

Mobilise one co-responder directly from home/work rather than mobilise a crew and fire engine from a station. This will improve attendance times, save more lives and reduce costs.

 

Proposal 4

 

Reduce the number of middle/senior managers. As a result of our business changes, we will be able to reduce officer numbers without compromising performance.

 

Proposal 5

 

Invest more time and money in additional prevention activity in 2013. Our analysis shows that for every 145,000 spent on targeted prevention activity, we significantly reduce the likelihood of a fire death. This will directly support our targeted approach and make people safer.

 

Proposal 6

 

Change the crewing of three fire engines in Plymouth to on call rather than whole time:
Plympton and Plymstock fire engines to become ‘on call’
Camelshead keeps one fire engine crewed by wholetime firefighters but one pump is moved to Crownhill.
Crownhill receives the fire engine moved from Camelshead and will have two fire engines, one crewed by wholetime and one crewed by on call firefighters
All On call cover is 24 cover. There will still be seven front line fire engines in Plymouth. Response times are largely unaffected and may be further improved by the introduction of additional light rescue pumps.

 

Proposal 7

 

Crew the aerial appliance at Crownhill with on call staff. No other aerial ladder platform is permanently crewed so this harmonises Plymouth with the arrangements elsewhere within the Service.

 

Proposal 8

 

Cancel the pilot scheme at Yeovil fire station where an additional four firefighters are provided for non-operational activity (this standardises crewing so that Yeovil is crewed the same as other similar fire stations).

 

Proposal 9

 

Change the crewing arrangements of the second fire appliances at Taunton from wholetime to on call. Many firefighters already operate as on call firefighters on these stations. The same number of fire engines will remain available and will be crewed as and when needed and during busy times.

 

Proposal 10

 

Change the crewing arrangements of the second fire appliances at Torquay from wholetime to on call. Many firefighters already operate as on call firefighters on these stations. The same number of fire engines will remain available and will be crewed as and when needed and during busy times.

 

Proposal 11

 

Change the crewing arrangements of the fire engine at Ilfracombe from day crewed (wholetime, day-time only) to on call.

 

In addition, the Service will:

 

Reduce support staff by at least 5% by not renewing some fixed term contracts
Save more than 1m through greater efficiencies in our back office support functions, improving procurement and how we manage our spending.

 

 

BBC News Report:

Devon and Somerset Fire Service facing 5m budget cuts

Reducing the number of fire engines and closing stations would be a last resort, a source has said

Devon and Somerset Fire Service is facing millions of pounds of budget cuts, according to a leaked document.

DevonAerial Ladder Platform DSFRS Source (Photo: sam mitchell, wikipedia)

The internal email was written by Chief Fire Officer Lee Howell.

Referring to a cut in the government grant settlement for 2013/14 and 2014/15, Mr Howell said the service will have to save 5.5m.

The service has declined to comment, but the Fire Brigades Union (FBU) fears stations may close and the number of fire engines could be reduced.

Under the proposals three Plymouth fire engines, at Plympton, Plymstock, and Camels Head, would be crewed on call rather than full-time.

The citys aerial ladder platform would also be crewed on an on-call basis.

Ilfracombes fire station faces being cut from day-crewed to on call.

Torquays second fire engine would also be cut from full time to on call, as would the second fire engine in Taunton.

The proposals are going out to public consultation before a decision in February.

Politically difficult
The email, obtained by the BBC, outlines how the money the service receives from the government will be reduced by 10.3% in 2013/14 and by a further 7.3% in 2014/15.

This means that we will need to save 3.4m in the next financial year and 2.1m in the following year, Mr Howells email said.

It does not outline how the savings will be found, but the BBC understands managers are working on a series of proposals.

The FBU said it feared services would inevitably suffer and has promised to fight the cuts.

A senior source at Devon and Somerset Fire Service said everything had to be on the agenda when it was facing such a difficult financial situation.

However, it would be a last resort to close fire stations and cut the number of fire engines.

That would be extremely unpopular with the public, and politically very difficult to deal with, managers told the BBC, adding nothing would be implemented which could in any way endanger public safety.

Devon and Somerset Fire Authority will decide how it believes the savings should be made at its meeting on Friday 18th January and a 12-week public consultation will follow. (below)

By Simon Hall

BBC South West Home Affairs Correspondent

Devon & Somerset Fire & Rescue Press Release 18 Jan 2013:

Devon & Somerset Fire & Rescue Authority members have agreed a range of proposals to save 5.5 million which will now go to public consultation.

The Service�s Government grant has been reduced by 10.3% in 2013 and a further 7.3% in 2014, which means the Service will lose 3.4m in the next financial year and a further 2.1m the following year.

Cllr Mark Healey, Chairman of the Devon & Somerset Fire & Rescue Authority, said �The Chief Fire Officer and I have lobbied Government and will continue to do so to ensure we get a better Grant settlement next time. In addition, we have specifically asked for a meeting with the Minister to outline our concerns.

�We will now be keen to listen to staff and the public but whatever the outcome of the consultation, we still will need to save 5.5m. Closing fire stations is not where we want to be.�

Chief Fire Officer Lee Howell said: �These are difficult times and difficult decisions need to be made. The proposals that have been agreed for public consultation today do not require closure of fire stations, removal of fire engines or compulsory redundancies.

�We aim to maintain or improve public safety by changing the way we do business and by crewing some fire engines differently but like many other public and private organisations, we do have to operate with less money�.

The consultation period will start on 28 January 2013 and end on 22 April 2013.

Additional information

The proposed changes are:

Proposal 1

Extend the roll out of light rescue pumps which was consulted on, and agreed, last year. These vehicles reduce cost and improve performance.

Proposal 2

Implement the changes in how we will respond to automatic fire alarms (98% of which are false alarms) so that we only respond to high risk buildings automatically. This was consulted on and received public support last year. We now plan to further implement this change.

Proposal 3

Mobilise one co-responder directly from home/work rather than mobilise a crew and fire engine from a station. This will improve attendance times, save more lives and reduce costs.

Proposal 4

Reduce the number of middle/senior managers. As a result of our business changes, we will be able to reduce officer numbers without compromising performance.

Proposal 5

Invest more time and money in additional prevention activity in 2013. Our analysis shows that for every 145,000 spent on targeted prevention activity, we significantly reduce the likelihood of a fire death. This will directly support our targeted approach and make people safer.

Proposal 6

Change the crewing of three fire engines in Plymouth to �on call� rather than whole time:
� Plympton and Plymstock fire engines to become on call
� Camelshead keeps one fire engine crewed by wholetime firefighters but one pump is moved to Crownhill.
� Crownhill receives the fire engine moved from Camelshead and will have two fire engines, one crewed by wholetime and one crewed by on call firefighters

There will still be seven front line fire engines in Plymouth. Response times are largely unaffected and may be further improved by the introduction of additional light rescue pumps.

Proposal 7

Crew the aerial appliance at Crownhill with �on call� staff. No other aerial ladder platform is permanently crewed so this harmonises Plymouth with the arrangements elsewhere within the Service.

Proposal 8

Cancel the pilot scheme at Yeovil fire station where an additional four firefighters are provided for non-operational activity (this standardises crewing so that Yeovil is crewed the same as other similar fire stations).

Proposal 9

Change the crewing arrangements of the second fire appliances at Taunton from wholetime to �on call�.� Many firefighters already operate as �on call� firefighters on these stations. The same number of fire engines will remain available and will be crewed as and when needed and during busy times.

Proposal 10

Change the crewing arrangements of the second fire appliances at Torquay from wholetime to �on call�.� Many firefighters already operate as �on call� firefighters on these stations. The same number of fire engines will remain available and will be crewed as and when needed and during busy times.

Proposal 11

Change the crewing arrangements of the fire engine at Ilfracombe from day crewed (wholetime, day-time only) to �on call�.

In addition, the Service will:

Reduce support staff by at least 5% by not renewing some fixed term contracts

Save more than 1m through greater efficiencies in our back office support functions, improving procurement and how we manage our spending.

Meanwhile, FBU is urging the public in Devon and Somerset to protest against the most savage cuts ever to their local fire and rescue service.

The government has reduced its grant to the Devon and Somerset fire and rescue service by 10.3% for the year 2013/14 and 7.3% for the year 2014/15. This means a loss of 3.4m in the next financial year and 2.1m the following, cuts three times more savage than any ever imposed on the service before, by any previous government, and gives the lie to Minister Eric Pickles� claim that the fire and rescue service is somehow being protected.

On January 18th, the fire authority and fire service senior managers will put forward proposals for public consultation, to include a set of cuts that would see fire appliances removed from local communities.

Devon and Somerset FBU secretary Trevor French said: �Rather than just accept these enormous cuts forced upon us by central government, the fire authority along with chief fire officer Lee Howell should tell the coalition government that this scale of cuts is unacceptable, risks destroying the fabric of this important service, and ultimately puts more lives at risk.�

As a rural service and one of the biggest in the country, Devon and Somerset have long argued that a �sparsity� factor should be included in any grant settlement received. This would take into account the lack of neighbouring services for support and the sheer scale of area that has to be covered by one fire and rescue service.

FBU brigade chair Bob Walker said: �If the cuts proposed go through, there will be fewer firefighters, fewer fire stations and fewer fire engines. After the recent floods and fires firefighters have dealt with so professionally, the cuts would be a real kick in the teeth for both the public and the service. The FBU is asking people in our communities to stand up against damaging proposals for the fire and rescue service before it is too late.�

About Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue Service (Wikipedia)

BBC News Report

18 January 2013 Last updated at 17:14

Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue faces 5.5m budget cut

Proposals aiming to save the fire service 5.5m have been approved by Devon and Somerset Fire and Rescue Authority.

Eleven measures needed to cut costs were passed at a meeting earlier in response to a drop in funding from central government.

The package will now be subject to a 12-week public consultation.

These are difficult times and difficult decisions need to be made, said chief fire officer Lee Howell.

Sense of angerThe proposals that have been agreed for public consultation today do not require closure of fire stations, removal of fire engines or compulsory redundancies.

We aim to maintain or improve public safety by changing the way we do business and by crewing some fire engines differently.

But Tam McFarlane, from the Fire Brigades Union, said there was a very real sense of anger among members over the decision.

Rather than just accepting enormous budget cuts the fire authority should be telling the government that they are totally unacceptable, he said.

It was only a few weeks ago that firefighters were working day and night performing rescues during the biggest floods in living memory.

It should have been obvious then that we were stretched to the limit but now, just a few weeks later we are facing massive frontline cuts.

Closures not wantedCost-cutting measures include implementing changes in how the service responds to automatic fire alarms, reducing the number of middle/senior managers and reducing support staff by at least 5% by not renewing some fixed-term contracts.

Conservative councillor Mark Healey, authority chairman, said he will lobby government to get a better grant settlement next time.

We will now be keen to listen to staff and the public but whatever the outcome of the consultation, we still will need to save 5.5m, he said.

Closing fire stations is not where we want to be.

The authority has said its government grant has been reduced by 10.3% in 2013 and will fall a further 7.3% in 2014.

The reduction means a budget cut of 3.4m in the next financial year and a further 2.1m the following year.

The consultation period will start on 28 January and end on 22 April.

Meanwhile, .a spokesman for the Torquay station said (before the Authority meeting): Our main cause for concern is we are losing our second full-time appliance.

(Photo: wikipedia.org)
Torquay Fire Station

We understand the need to be able to try to fill the funding gaps, but there is a fine line between doing that and putting the public at risk and we feel that this is a step too far.

There are inherent dangers of taking away one pump. It is increasing danger to members of the public by taking away cover.

Firefighters in Torquay were called together last week to hear bosses outline the plans.

They were told the service needed to make cuts of 5.5million due to a drop in Government funding.

As a result, a proposal has been made to cutback the number of full-time pumps at three stations in Plymouth as well as ones in Ilfracombe and Torquay.

No jobs will be lost, with firefighters re-deployed to fill gaps and fire safety duties elsewhere in the counties.

The station spokesman added: There are inherent dangers in what they are proposing with regard to the time-scale of getting resources to incidents.

We feel it is the case that lives will be put at risk. We wont be able to turn out two fire appliances immediately � the other would now be on-call.

Our standard of cover is currently 10 minutes for the first pump and 13 minutes for the second. We feel there are some areas of Torquay where this time will be extended and that is our concern.

The service proposal states the same number of fire engines will remain available with the third appliance crewed as and when needed.

Chief fire officer Lee Howell said: The changes we propose aim to strike the balance between making savings and maintaining public safety.

These are difficult times and difficult choices are needed. The status quo is simply not an option given the need to significantly reduce the budget.

Firefighters have met Torbay MP Adrian Sanders. He has now written to fire chiefs to clarify what the proposals would mean.

The letter says: Although, as I understand it, the third engine will physically remain in place in the Torquay, as it will be permanently unmanned it will equate to a significant loss of fire fighting capacity.

But he said he understood the financial difficulties.

The Fire Brigades Union has reacted furiously to what it calls the most savage cuts ever.

Trevor French, Devon and Somerset FBU secretary, said: Rather than just accept these enormous cuts forced upon us by central Government, the fire authority along with chief fire officer Lee Howell should tell the coalition government this scale of cuts is unacceptable, risks destroying the fabric of this important service, and ultimately puts more lives at risk. Herald Express

Related:
FBU slams proposals for massive cuts in Devon & Somerset Fire and Rescue Service – 250313 1355z
https://goatysnews.wordpress.com/2013/03/25/fbu-slams-proposals-for-massive-cuts-in-devon-somerset-fire-and-rescue-service-250313-1355z/

Heroic river rescue at Umberleigh, Barnstable, Devon by RNLI lifeboat volunteers – 070113 2035z

Paul, Chris and Martin revisiting the location of the rescue in Umberleigh. Credit Robin Goodlad, RNLI

On Saturday 22 December, two volunteers from Porthcawl RNLI lifeboat crew were deployed to Barnstable to assist the RNLI Flood Rescue Team and Fire Service during major flooding in the Devon and Cornwall area.

The Porthcawl RNLI crewmembers are part of the charitys specialist Flood Rescue Team and were immediately called upon to rescue a woman hanging on for her life in a swollen river at Umberleigh near Barnstable.

The two crew members from Porthcawl, who volunteer with the charitys Flood Rescue Team, were 46 year old Team Leader Paul Eastment and 25 year old Helmsman Chris Missen. The Porthcawl RNLI volunteers worked with fellow Flood Rescue Team volunteer Martin Blakerrowe from Poole to rescue the woman from the floods. Both Paul and Chris have previous experience in flood rescue, and were deployed to recent flooding at St Asaph and Aberystwyth, as well as the Cockermouth floods in 2009.

When Paul and Chris arrived in Barnstable Fire Station in the early hours of Sunday morning, they were immediately deployed to assist in reports of a man and child on a car roof with a woman washed off the roof of a car with her position unknown.

When they arrived at the scene, they were met with a fast flowing swollen river which had broken its banks, and had started flooding adjacent fields and roadways. By now
the man and child had been rescued and the womans location had been identified by the police helicopter.

As team leader, Paul made the decision to launch immediately from the roadway, through a gate leading to the river where the woman was hanging on to a tree. Paul said:

It was very dark in the area with no street lights. I could hear the lady screaming from the river, and I made the decision to launch, I knew my crew were capable of saving her due to the specialist flood rescue training they have received.
Helmsman Chris Missen said:

This was the most difficult rescue I have ever had to perform. In a swollen, fast flowing river in flood, it is difficult to steer and control the boat the way you want, as the power of the water wants to take you straight downstream. I had to control the boat by steering it backwards down the river until I reached the lady, then steer sideways into the trees to rescue her. When we pulled her into the boat she was very cold, and we took her quickly to the river bank. I believe that if we had not rescued her when we did, she would have soon got hyperthermia and loose her grip on the branch, as she had been in the river for around 50 minutes.

Mr. John Abrahams, the Chairman of Porthcawl RNLI Lifeboat Station said:

We are all very proud of what Paul and Christopher did last weekend. Not only do they give up their time volunteering to be part of the RNLI lifeboat crew saving people at sea, but they are also on call 24/7 as part of the RNLI Flood Rescue Team, saving people from major flooding in the UK. The rescue they carried out was very much out of the norm, and was definitely the most heroic deed I have heard of well above the call of duty

Police today issued a warning and image of a suspect following an assault in Exeter

Associated Image

Police have today issued an EVOFIT image of a suspect following an assault in Exeter.

Police are appealing for witnesses following the incident along The Quay in Exeter on the evening of Friday 7 December 2012.

At about 7.50pm a woman in her thirties was running along the canal path between The Port Royal pub and Trews Weir Bridge when she was approached by a man from behind and pushed against a wall. She screamed and the man ran off.

The suspect is described as Indian or Asian in appearance, aged approximately 28 to 30 years old and of a slight build. He has thick wavy dark hair which is short and distinctly has bushy eyebrows. He was wearing dark clothing and a scarf around his neck that also covered his lower face.

Police are urging the public to take care when out alone and to take some sensible precautions, such as running with a partner, particularly during the hours of darkness and always carry a mobile phone.

Anyone who recognises the suspect or has any information please contact police on 101 quoting reference DE/12/12155 or call Crimestoppers on 0800 555111.

Smuggling and North Devon – 151212 2045z

Smuggling and North Devon

At the start of the eighteenth century Bideford was a booming and nationally eminent port. The trade with the colonies, Western Europe and more locally with South Wales and Ireland was thriving. However, as we may expect, there was a black underside to the Little White Town’ and the Golden Bay ‘ it superintended. There were those opportunists who exploited this and sought to maximise their own profits through evading customs duties: Smuggling.

On top of the usual problems of loosing evidence and records over several centuries as an illicit activity there is obviously not a plethora of factual evidence to provide neat and tidy stories and answers to the multitude of questions which smuggling triggers.- What was the extent and what was smuggled? What were their methods? Who were the smugglers and what was their nature: opportunists, self justified free traders or violent criminals?

As such it means that the start of investigations begins with preventative laws, seizures of smuggled goods (so failed attempts) or with the local romanticised legends or folk stories that the south west coast is famous for accompanying those of piracy and wrecking.

This further raises the fact that smugglers have long been prone to the Robin Hood effect’; seen as the only honest thief. rob[bing] nothing but the revenue(Lamb p.698). These images have often veiled the reality of smuggling to later generations but also provided both shields and justification to contemporaries. This defence was especially strong when import taxes were imposed by a faceless government in order to raise revenue for a series of unpopular wars. This in turn makes attempting to assess the true volume of smuggling and the number direct and indirect (those who bought the prohibited goods or aided the smugglers) participants practically impossible. Were we a nation of smugglers? (Gaydon p.65)

Thomas Benson

The most famous of the Bideford based smugglers. Despite his story displaying him as being selfish and ruthless his infamy stands as testament to how subsequent generations have regarded his daring and sheer audacity against the British government. Ironically it was the governmental laws and systems of patronage enabled his career as a merchant- privateer, which in turn facilitated his felonies. He was eventually exposed and his tale highlights key points and themes in smuggling and how his Bideford setting enabled it. [Link to longer Benson article]

Thomas Benson inherited the large family fortune, estate (Knapp House, Northam) and business valued at an estimated 40 000 in 1743 aged 36. From this juncture his ambitious and daring personality led him to increase his wealth and influence to become Sheriff of Devon in 1746 and MP for Barnstaple in 1747, the same year he began a lease of Lundy.

The position of Lundy, made it ideal for his purposes, 13 miles of Hartland point, it was away from prying eyes, whilst still being conveniently located for the local and international trade that used the Bristol Channel . Benson unloaded many of the convicts he was supposed to be transporting to America on Lundy. At this point he then used them to hide his other smuggled goods, largely tobacco from the colonies.

His eventual downfall came after he scuttled’ an old, barely seaworthy boat the Nightingale in order to gain the insurance for both the boat and the contents he had supposedly lost. In fact he had unloaded these on Lundy the day previously. Benson and his crew thought they had pulled off the ingenious scam, but instead they met their downfall after the inebriated boasting of one of the crew James Bather to one of Benson’s rivals Matthew Reeder.

This was the catalyst which served to expose a whole plethora of Benson’s crimes over the preceding two years, which included smuggling 99 000lb of British Colonial tobacco and a debt to the Crown of 8229. When Benson realised that he could not evade punishment he used his mercantile contacts and fled to Oporto in Portugal , then Viga in Spain where he comfortably lived out his life.

Of the others involved, only a few served gaol time and it was only Lancey received a sentence. This may seem more surprising given the number of witnesses bought into Lancey’s trial who were not part of the Nightingale Crew but who worked for Benson and give themselves away as being aware of what Benson was up to on Lundy. This may have been affected by the 1746 Indemnity Act which pardoned those who gave information which led to the capture of other smugglers. Further given the scandal caused- a corrupt Mp and County Sherrif acting in total disregard to the law it could well be that Lancey’s harsh punishment was indeed to be an example of him.

The Heyday of Smuggling

Who were the smugglers up against?

As we can see from Benson’s case smuggling was able to occur under the guise of legal trading in the eighteenth century. This was not necessarily on the scale of Benson, but Customs records are littered with small scale seizures as well as mistakes’ and discrepancies in the ships papers, suggesting that low volume smuggling was indeed widespread and common. This was largely enabled through the inefficiency and potential corruption of Customs.

Firstly, customs were based in Bideford itself yet were required to monitor a huge estuarial and coastal area. In the eighteenth century the port of Bideford also superintended Appledore, so subsequently the entire estuary and all the small creeks and inlets (including several which ran to Benson’s property). On top of this the jurisdiction also stretched all the way out to Hartland, including the harbour of Clovelly and the multitude of secluded grey pebbled beaches, where one would assume a level of smuggling could have been sustained, untraced and unrecorded for years.

Secondly, Customs was made up from a hodge-podge of posts and often with inadequate personnel. [Unfortunately, Bideford’s customs records were lost in a fire in the nineteenth century, but in looking at our neighbours Barnstaple’s customs records we can gage what the situation would most likely have been like and often there is an overlap between the two ports, so we can find evidence related to the Port of Bideford within them.] Barnstaple ‘s Custom records clearly show that its staff were often not up to the task throughout the eighteenth century:

In 1727 two tidewaiters in were suspended for absence from the ship they were supposed to be watching. Went on Appledore Quay for a cupp of beer’.

1799- the acting collector called all officers to the custom house for a collective charge of neglect.

From these types of charges, which frequently crop up it is evident that even if the customs officers were not actively and deliberately aiding smugglers, through neglect they certainly passively helped the free traders’. Moreover we see (and can often infer) from the customs records that the officers were not averse themselves to taking advantage of contraband and unaccustomed goods:

In 1804 the Betsey was seized just off Appledore (it was hotly contested between Bideford and Barnstaple as to who had rights over it). On seizing the vessel the Barnstaple Collector and Controller dealt out the wine and spirits as he chose’. The next day one of the officers, the tidewaiter Perryman had been found dead alongside the boat. Matthews then asserted that he had died by falling overboard in a state on intoxication’ and further insisted that as only 2 out of 100 large casks and 16 out of 442 of the small easily moveable casks’ were missing, that this was a small enough discrepancy to prove no embezzlement’ on their behalf.

However this case takes on a more sinister and puzzling turn as the Bideford Collector (who had also sought the prize) claimed that Perryman was found floating dead with wound in neck and face and eyes much bruised and further a Boat came alongside the Prize and was laden with part of the cargo, which was carried into the port of Bidefordno doubt the officer.lost his life by not acceding to the measure.

Quite what the real truth of this event was, we will probably never know but it does clearly illustrate a high level of ineffectiveness and fraud within the institution which was meant to prevent smuggling and clearly does not show them to be figures of respect within their communities.

However to explain the rise of the heyday’ of smuggling and what propelled the more traditional image of the smuggler, he who worked by moonlight in deserted beaches, we need to look at national changes and how they manifested themselves in Bideford. Ultimately it boiled down to war.

War and smuggling had an antagonistic relationship. For the most part war was unpopular, damaging trade, draining resources and press gangs forcing men into service. Press gangs were particularly prominent in Bideford and the surrounding area due to the large number of seafaring men, one only needs to look at the Beaver Inn, Appledore which stands as testament. Trade and resources diminished increased demand for goods and the government raised customs and revenue taxes in order to fund increasingly expensive wars. This high taxation of course increased incentive (and the potential profits) to smuggle and also heightened resentment towards the increasingly centralised, bureaucratic government. This is particularly prevalent to Bideford who by the mid 17 th century had lost much of its input in the national government. This as a mercantile class were starting to supplant the traditional aristocracy and Bideford was had been losing its relative national importance as a centre of trade. On the flipside it was this very distance from authority which also helped to facilitate smuggling and the wars helped masked much smuggling and privateering.

The government of course tried to prevent smuggling as it obviously drained the government’s revenue and resources and we see more and more draconian measures and Acts passed during the eighteenth century. This included a Hovering Act in 1718 to deter small vessels from hovering near the coast, waiting to pick up contraband goods and Indemnity Acts in 1736 and 1746 which made smuggling a capital punishment, though pardoned those who provided further information on fellow smugglers. These proved to have limited success and instead began a vicious cycle: the stakes were raised, so the smugglers responded with more cunning, daring and violence. This cycle escalated, fuelled by other factors such as an increase in consumerism: those goods which had once been luxuries were now perceived as necessities, such as Tea.

For the government smuggling was not only an economic drain but also perceived as an attack against the government and the country itself, an internal war raging alongside those externally. This image of a fight against a monolithic government was only to become more potent as in the mid eighteenth century, outside of war time the government employed naval vessels to defend against smuggling. Furthermore was the introduction of Excise Officers, who were far more regulated and centrally controlled than the Customs officers and one can imagine the kind of reception a governmental stranger would have had in relatively small and close knit communities. They were more successful and on capturing a smuggling vessel it would then be taken as a revenue vessel or broken up, visualising the destruction of the smugglers’ trade. However, again these officers had huge distances to patrol, so despite an increased efficiency their total success was limited and a cat and mouse game ensued.

This whole situation was exacerbated during the American war of Independence . Economically, as the colonies were Britain ‘s biggest trading partner (indeed it had made Bideford’s fortune a century before) and consequently by the early 1780’s it was estimated that two thirds of the tea drunk in England was smuggled. Also it was ideologically damaging as the Colonies were fighting against their centralised control in Britain . This heightened fears of smuggling and caused the image of the smuggler to become more politicised, illustrated by Lord Pembroke in 1781, Will Washington take America or the Smugglers England first?. With this in mind it is not surprising that the next law against smuggling, The Act of Oblivion’ in 1782 entailed that a smuggler could clear his name if he served in the Royal Navy.

Following defeat, defeat more preventative measures were taken and duties were slashed in 1784, most importantly on tea, from 119% to 12%. This was clever move as due to teas’ light bulky nature it was often used to hide other smuggled goods within the ballast or hold. Correspondingly, although it had been a small proportion of the seized goods, there are no more seizures of tea during the period in the North Devon Customs records after 1784, but this does not apply to other items.

By this point smuggling has for some years been increasingand carried on at present on the Coasts of Devon and Cornwall to such an alarming Extent and in such a systematic manner’. The evidence available corresponds with the imagery that the southwest remains famous for, utilising isolated areas, stealth and violence when necessary. The Customs records in 1804 give us a wealth of circumstances:

In summer these goods were landed in summer along the coasts of north Cornwall and North West Devon whereas in winter, further east in safer water. Further, on landing these goods they are conveyed into the interior, by Land, after night, on horsesin a body of 20 or 30, very strongly guarded’.

Smugglers were using vessels, being of the description of vessels employed in the limestone trade[with]..limestones on deck’. -The bulky cargo was used to hide goods, whilst the chemical composition of limestone itself required to be unloaded by the limekilns which were numerous around Bideford and in isolated locations.

There have been reports of smugglers conveying Goods by Land after night, to cross the River in Various places with their Horses in low water to avoid entering town over the bridges

Wrecking

Running parallel to the legends of smuggling are those more sinisterly of wrecking. This is a grey area of smuggling as the goods had, escaped the degradation of the gauger’s brand’. A good wreck season was seen much like a good mackerel season, God given to alleviate the harsh and meagre existence of the dwellers along the coast’. If there were no survivors it was believed that the cargo was no one’s property and eerily a local superstition was that a life saved from the sea brought no one any luck’ (Smith p. 65) Recorded events and acts do indeed imply a malevolent picture and not necessarily just cases of salvage:

In January of 1737 the Golden Mary of Bristol , stranded at Saunton Sands and all men lost’. Some of the cargo was salvaged by the Customs but over the next five months there are reports of Customs finding and confiscating more of these goods in the hands of local merchants.

In February 1802 the Hope of Penryn, laden with Portuguese oranges, had become a total wreck every person on board perished’ leaving goods to be salvaged. The officers concerned only reported the incident several hours after it had happened by which time much of the cargo had been stolen. More sinisterly, the reports add that with help, rather than the immediate plunder of the vessel, she could have been put ashore inside the bar and probably saved’

An Act of 1753 made it a non clergyable felony to kill or impede anyone trying to escape a wreck and a capital offence to put a light on rocks and draw a ship to danger.

The Legacy

The proliferation of smuggling did indeed decrease, especially after the Napoleonic Wars, and increase in prevention and decrease in taxation. However the romantic idea of the smuggler has indeed lived on in and around Bideford, as elsewhere in the Southwest by still having a hold over peoples’ imaginations. This is perhaps hardly surprising given both the strong sense of local identity still present and the physical setting. The beautiful awe inspiring coast that surround Bideford and the area under its jurisdiction: the isolated coves and creeks and the majestic, yet threatening cliffs and reefs.

The locally infamous, eccentric Reverand Hawker claimed that on arrival to Morwenstow in 1834 he found a small, poor congregation, whose wretched condition pained him’. They lived alongside the remnants of smuggling daysthe love for it still smouldered in their veins’. Further it was claimed the vicarage, which was nearly in ruins was being used as a store for smuggled goods. The extent of truth here is debateable but it is an image which has been handed down. Most notably as Hawker published The Ballad of Cruel Coppinger’, a dastardly smuggler who formed an organised band of desperadoes, smugglers, wreckers and poachers’ after being washed up at Masland Mouth. The common view is that this is an elaborated tale based on an amalgamation of D.H Coppinger who was washed up in Welcombe 23 rd December 1792 and perhaps the mid eighteenth century merchant John Coppinger.

As long as there are restrictions people will smuggle; be it bringing home an extra packet of cigarettes from holiday or a much bigger illicit operation. We cannot generalise or bracket together all smugglers, but certainly in the idea of the honest thief’ is in no danger of dying out, holding particular resonance in this difficult economic time.

Select Bibliography

Barnstaple Customs Records

The Trial of John Lancy in Select Trials in the Sessions- House at the Old Bailey’, Vol III ( London 1764) Eighteenth Century Collections Online , pp. 29-48.

Anon, Journal of the time I spent on the Island of Lundy in the years 1752 and 1787′, North Devon Magazine (1824)

Brewer. J, The Sinews of Power (Unwin Hyman: London 1989)

Drake. D, Members of Parliament for Barnstaple 1689-1832′, Transactions of the Devonshire Association, 73, p. 185Fielder Duncan , A History of Bideford (Philimore & Co Ltd.: Chichester 1985)

Gaydon. T, North Devon Smugglers’ in The North Devon Magazine (Masland Printers:Tiverton 1989), pp.65-67.

Hawker. Rev. R.J, Cruel Coppinger’ in Complete Prose Works of Rev R.W. Hawker (1893), pp. 95-107.

Lamb, Charles, Old Margate Hoy’, in The Last Essays of Elia. from Hutchinson . T (ed.), The Works of Charles Lamb (Oxford University Press: Oxford 1924), pp. 692-99.

Smith. G, Shipwrecks of the Bristol Channel (Countryside Books: Newbury 1991)

Tenstrom. M, The Ownership of Lundy by Sir Richard Grenville and his Descendants, 1577-1775′, Transactions of the Devonshire Association , 130 (1998), pp.65-80.

Thomas. S, The Nightingale Scandal: The Story of Thomas Benson and Lundy (Myrtle Tenstrom: Cheltenham 2001)

Rowen McKenzie

This work by Bideford 500 is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales License

Goaty’s News is grateful to Bideford 500 for making this work Creative Commons

More about Parson Hawker

File:St Morwenna, Morwenstow.jpg

(Photo: Bob Parkes – Creative Commons)
Parson Hawker’s church – St Morwenna, Morwenstow

“Down the centuries the rugged and unforgiving north Cornwall coastline as taken a terrible toll on sea vessels. And the iron shore of the parish itself as seen a number of tragedies, not least one on the 7th Sept. 1843. The 200 ton brig Caledonia from Arbroath, sailing from Constantinople to Bristol, via Falmouth, with a cargo of grain foundered at Vicarage Cliffs with the lose of all but one of its nine hands. Before Hawkers day corpses that washed ashore had been interred in situ, without ceremony. But Hawker knew it was his Christian duty to give a proper burial to all who had perished within the bounds of the parish. The warrior figurehead of the ship – prominent inside the churchyard marks the collective grave of its crew. “

Extract fromParson Hawker: The Universal Priest Poet of Morwenstow by Stewart Beer

“Hawker was a legendary eccentric. He is known to have dressed up as a mermaid and excommunicated his cat for mousing on Sundays. He dressed in claret-coloured coat, blue fisherman’s jersey, long sea-boots, a pink brimless hat and a poncho made from a yellow horse blanket, which he claimed was the ancient habit of St Pardarn. He talked to birds, invited his nine cats into church. He kept a huge pig as a pet.

Hawker is believed to be the person who brought back the mediaeval custom of the Harvest Festival into the church. He also ensured that sailors drowned in shipwrecks received a Christian burial.

He was concerned that the bodies of drowned men received a Christian burial, and would scramble down the cliffs, and carry back the bodies for a church grave. Until Hawker they were often buried on the beach where they were found, without Christian rites, as the belief was that it was not possible to tell if they were Christian or not.” – Extract from http://www.cornwall-calling.co.uk/famous-cornish-people/hawker.htm

Hawker’s Hut

This driftwood hut on the cliffs near Morwenstow is the National Trust’s smallest property. It was built by the eccentric Reverend Hawker, who was vicar of Morwenstow from 1834 until his death in 1875. Hawker would sit in his hut and write poetry and it was here that he penned ‘The Song of the Western Men’, which has become a Cornish anthem.

Reward to catch cat killer now £1,800; Cat skewered with 1m long bamboo cane – 101112 1940z

Rewards totalling £1,800 have been offered to find the criminals responsible for killing a cat by skewering it with a metre-long bamboo cane.

“The attack on two-year-old tabby cat, Jack, left him with horrific fatal injuries.

(Photo: thisisplymouth.co.uk)
Jack the cat killed

 

Jack was found by the owner’s neighbour on October 19 in Weston Mill, Plymouth in Devon.

Following the incident an anonymous donor came forward to offer up a £300 reward, then last week, another £500 was offered up by another anonymous donor for information leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible.

The anonymous donor said: “I’m sickened by this.

“I wanted to match what the other donor was offering and I’d pay £500 to have these people caught.

“I can’t understand how anyone could do this to an animal – it’s outrageous.

“Reading the story made my blood run cold to think what that poor cat went through.”

Yesterday another £1,000 was offered from charities Crimestoppers and the People for Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA).

The reward is being offered by PETA through independent charity Crimestoppers for information being passed on to the crime-fighting charity’s 0800 555 111 number that leads to the arrest and conviction of those responsible.

Stephen Pearce, chairman for Devon and Cornwall Crimestoppers, said: “This is a cruel and cowardly attack that has been carried out on a defenceless animal, and we are horrified by the injuries inflicted on Jack.

“The person or persons responsible for this crime need to be brought to justice and should not be allowed to get away with their actions.

“We are appealing to the public to pass on any information they might have to Crimestoppers anonymously and help us find those responsible.”

PETA spokesperson, Ben Williamson, added: “It is imperative that any community faced with such horrific abuse of animals take measures to find the culprit or culprits and stop the violence. Animal abusers are a danger to everyone – they take their issues out on whomever is available to them, human or non-human.”

Alex Harris, the owner of two-year-old Jack, spoke to The Herald about the incident last month.

A bamboo cane was forced diagonally through the tabby cat’s body and after extensive surgery the cat passed away from his injuries.

Alex is currently in the Falklands with the Royal Navy.

Police say the attack was so sickening they are concerned about the kind of person who was behind it.

The investigation is currently ongoing and anyone with information can contact the police, in confidence, on 101, quoting crime reference number ED/12/5858.

Alternatively call Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111 or through the secure online form at http://www.crimestoppers-uk.org.”

CLAIRE JONES Plymouth Herald Reporter

Copied from Plymouth Herald

Full story and comments here

UK: Dramatic sea rescue at Soar Mill Cove, Salcombe, Devon – Published 210812 1700Z

Dramatic sea rescue of a surfer in the teeth of a South Westerly gale at Soar Mill Cove – who was snatched to safety in a boiling sea only yards from rocks at the picturesque beauty spot on Friday.

The whole incident was filmed by onlookers from the headland and posted on You Tube:

Youtuber Goodgums: A surfer was stranded in a riptide for 45 minutes before being rescued by the brave crew of a RNLI rib. Watch till the end where the boat is nearly capsized by the surf. The RNLI boats are crewed by volunteers and funded by donations. Please consider sending a donation

At the helm of the Salcombe RNLI Inshore Lifeboat was coxswain Sam Viles, with crew member Matt Davies and Dr Ester McLarthy, an RNLI medic.  Both Sam and Matt are part of the 12 strong staff that help run Salcombe Harbour with Harbourmaster Ian Gibson.

Five of Ian’s staff are volunteer lifeboatmen and the sixth a retained fireman.

Said Ian: “This is just fantastic what they did.  A surfer was caught in a rip tide in this Southerly Gale and he had become entangled in his surfboard leash. He had managed to stay afloat for 45 minutes until the Salcombe Lifeboat reached him. But they had to take the lifeboat into the surf-zone. You can see from the video how tricky this was. And hear the cheers from the onlookers when they finally get him aboard.”

He added: “It makes me very proud when I see members of my staff who volunteer to put themselves into these conditions to save a life, carry off such a spectacular feat of seamanship like this.  There were very real risks involved in this rescue as the near capsize of the lifeboat shows at the end of this video.”

Coxswain Sam said after the rescue: “It was a little bit hairy. But you don’t think about it that much.  We thought it was do-able and it was.  The problem was the surfer was tangled up in his leash that links him to his board. And he could not catch the grab line we threw to him.  I went in first with one engine so that if one got damaged I would have a spare but had to try again with both engines. We found a lull in the swell and pulled him aboard. When the big wave hit us the crew and myself only just manage to hang on.”

The lifeboat returned the surfer and landed him at Whitestrand, Salcombe, after receiving treatment for hypothermia by Dr McLarthy on board and was airlifted to Derriford Hospital for a checkup by the Devon Air Ambulance from South Hams District Council’s North Sands Car Park. The surfer who was uninjured and wore a wet suit made full recovery.

Credit: South Hams District Council

UK: Dartmoor greener living centre under threat

(Photo: BBC)
Proper Job at Chagford
(Click on photo to go to BBC)

“A co-operative recycling project on Dartmoor could be forced to close after park bosses imposed a series of “ridiculous” demands, including tearing down unattractive parts of its “cluttered” site.

Proper Job has been salvaging and selling useful items such as furniture, books, tools and clothes from an industrial estate on the outskirts of Chagford for 17 years.

Now it says the national park authority wants to restrict what can be sold, reduce private donors and force it to take down or enclose the portable cabins which serve as its offices and sales units.

The project’s directors have urged the park to “move with the times” and say closing a centre whose only wish is to keep the local area tidy and sustainable is “absurd”.

Angharad Barlow, a co-operative director, said the conditions imposed were “ludicrous” and threatened to end the pioneering scheme” – WMN

Full story here:

http://www.thisiscornwall.co.uk/Moorland-green-project-facing-closure/story-16143763-detail/story.html

The BBC says “A community recycling centre in Devon says it could be driven out of business because of a planning row with a national park.

Proper Job, based in Chagford, has recycled and sold items for 20 years.

But the Dartmoor National Park Authority (DNPA) now says it needs planning permission for the buildings it uses.

The authority says it will consider Proper Job’s retrospective planning application in June.”

Full story here:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-devon-18154598

What is Proper Job?

Proper Job is a re-use, recycling, composting and food co-operative based in Chagford, a small town in the Dartmoor National Park.� It provides four inter-connected activities:� recycling, organic food production, training and a shop/cafe.� It has an elected Management Committee, 7 part-time workers and 7 volunteers with a turnover of approximately �150K.� It has an established UK reputation for knowledge and expertise about recycling issues. �It also hosts Devon Community Composting Network and Devon Community Recycling Network, with plans to host the Devon Low Carbon Network.

Composting of green waste and other recyclables, organic vegetable growing and training are run through The Resource Centre, at a permanent site on the outskirts of Chagford open to the public six days a week.� The site is divided up into types of recyclables and office space.� One area is devoted to green waste ie composting and sales of compost.� The remainder is devoted to other recyclables eg metals, wood, ceramic (bricks rubble etc), cardboard, plastic bubble wrap and polythene, batteries, mobile phones, cartridges etc and re-use items such as� books, clothes, textiles, building materials, salvage, timber, bric a brac, bicycles and furniture.� It has a turnover of approximately �21K.

The fourth activity is The Courtyard, a caf� and shop in the town centre, seating about 30 customers with a �130K turnover, which was set up in 1996 to provide Chagford with local, organic or fair traded goods. A shop has been opened at the reuse, recycle, compost site stocking environmentally friendly products including bio-degradable nappies, detergents, cosmetics and sanitary wear amongst a whole lot of other things.

See www.proper-job.org

(Source:Some information supplied by DEFRA may be a little out of date, but gives a flavour)

One local said� “It seems bonkers that they should be chasing this planning business after Proper Job has been been here for the past twenty odd year.”� Another, “….makes rubbish of David Cameron’s ‘Big Society’ ”

A key member of Proper Job staff wrote on Facebook,

“It’s not just my job, or the jobs of my fellow workers. The local community will also be loosing a vital service.

Also as the flagship of the Third Sector, the rest of the country will loose out on our consultancy.

Do you realise we’ve had people from America, Canada, Europe and Asia visit us to see how it’s done,?”

Whilst Proper Job may be embroiled with local planning issues, it has however enjoyed support at national level.

Phil Hope, former Minister for the Third Sector (pictured below visiting Proper Job) had made it quite clear where he stands.

“Small community organisations are an essential part of a strong local voluntary sector�indeed, they are a key part of a strong and thriving community�and support for their work is a Government priority.” – Hansard

Phil Hope – former minister for the third sector visits Proper Job in Chagford – Devon
from Left Nicky Scott, Richard Gomme, the minister, Val from the co-op – Seth and Mark PJ site workers – Jo Hodges founder member of PJ (retired)

RNLI and coastguard search for missing wreck diver

Rescuers searched in vain for a diver who disappeared while exploring a wreck yesterday.

View from Devoncourt. Exercise by RNLI off, and over, Breakwater beach.
� Copyright richard noyes and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence

The man, in his 40s, was diving the Benton Castle wreck at Start Bay, near Dartmouth, when he went missing.

His diving group searched for half an hour before raising the alarm at 12.15pm.

RNLI lifeboat and coastguard rescue teams from Torbay and Dartmouth were involved in the search, along with the coastguard rescue helicopter and civilian vessels, but the search was called off yesterday evening – thisissouthdevon.co.uk

London 2012 Olympics: Tom Daley wins European platform championship

Gold!!!! I am european champion again!!! Aaaah….and I’m 18 tomorrow!!! Aaaah!!!

(Photo: @TomDaley1994)
Tom Daley, European platform champion…..and 18 tomorrow.

Tom Daley marked his return to the scene of his first European title with a stunning personal 10m platform best score to seal his second continental crown in Eindhoven, Netherlands.

He was just 13 when he announced his arrival on the global stage ahead of the 2008 Olympics in Beijing .

He thinks his total of 565.05 will send out a message to his Chinese rivals.

“Word will spread because it’s quite a high score and they will start thinking about what they can do,” said Daley.

“It means so much to be European champion again though with a personal best and I couldn’t have asked for anything more,” he added to BBC Sport.

Daley turns 18 on Monday and his achievements in this 10m competition are all the more impressive given his preparations were hampered by a tricep injury, which saw him miss the defence of his title two years ago in Budapest. – BBC Sport

Full story here:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/0/olympics/18140511

The Plymouth teenager was publicly castigated by his Russian performance director, Alexei Evangulov, before the World Cup in February for focusing too much on his media work, but a lifetime best score of 565.05 provided further proof that he is back to his world-beating best – Simon Hart, writing in the Daily Telegraph

More here:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/olympics/9278699/London-2012-Olympics-Tom-Daley-wins-European-platform-championship-to-deliver-pefect-riposte-to-his-coach.html?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

Daley regains 10m title he won as 13-year-old in same city

Tom Daley will celebrate his 18th birthday on Monday as the European 10 metre platform champion after a dominant performance in Eindhoven on Sunday night. Daley had blitzed his rivals in the morning’s preliminary round…The Guardian

Tom Daley displays his medal after regaining the European 10-metre platform diving title in Eindhoven. (Photo: Clive Rose/Getty Images)

More here:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/2012/may/20/tom-daley-european-diving-title

Tom Daley carrys the Olympic Torch at Plymouth Hoe

1th Aug 2012: Tom Daley won his his first Olympic Medal in the London 2012 Olympic Games – Bronze in the Men Diving 10m Platform. (Goaty: Well done Tom, you did your dad proud!) https://p.twimg.com/A0DEhNfCUAAtioV.jpg

Related:

Tom Daley on towleroad.com (gay related site)

Search and rescue dog gets life-changing surgery

(Photo: http://www.thisisthewestcountry.co.uk)
Rusty, the search & rescue dog

One of the countrys most successful search and rescue dogs a six-year-old Border collie from Cullompton called Rusty is back on track to resume his career thanks to pioneering surgery on his leg.

Rusty, one of seven registered search and rescue dogs in the Dartmoor and Exmoor team, suffered a fracture dislocation after a road traffic accident.

Read more: http://www.thisisthewestcountry.co.uk/news/devon_news/9699763.Search_and_rescue_dog_gets_life_changing_surgery/?ref=rss&utm_medium=twitter&utm_source=twitterfeed