BE READY FOR BAD WEATHER and other emergencies – Advice and resources

This is a work in progress, more material will be added….

What should I do when it floods?- Vital advice from the UK Environment Agency

Environment Agency Live Flood Warning Map (link)

Advice from the British Red Cross:

Severe weather in winter

Weather in recent years seems to be getting more extreme. Severe weather in winter isn�€�t just uncomfortable; it can be life-threatening, particularly for elderly people.
Be prepared for severe weather

Keep an eye out for severe weather warnings from the Met Office.

If you�€�re going out, never be afraid to wear many layers of clothing. And don’t forget to cover your head – a simple winter hat will do a lot to protect your internal body temperature.

In your home, make sure heating is working efficiently and consider buying portable Calor gas or oil-fired heaters for emergencies.

Spend a little time now gathering essential items in a handy bag – one for home and one for travelling – and you�€�ll be prepared if sudden bad weather means you get stranded at home or while on the move.
What should go in your bag at home?

Torch
Battery radio
Toiletries / first aid kit
Long-life food and bottles of water
Important documents (eg. insurance policy)
List of emergency contact numbers
Spare keys to your home / car
Pencil, paper, penknife and whistle.

What should go in your travel bag?

Torch
Battery radio
Mobile phone
Cash and credit cards
List of emergency contact numbers
Winter boots, warm clothing and waterproofs
Ready-to-eat food, bottled water and warm drink in flask.

During severe weather

Elderly people are especially prone to hypothermia and pneumonia. Unfortunately, they are also the most likely to be living in older houses without adequate heating, so call in regularly on elderly friends, neighbours and relatives to see if they need help staying warm or getting provisions.
Motorists:

Car broken down on snowy road ©InfoStop and offer roadside assistance if you see someone’s car has broken down during severe weather; you could be saving someone’s life.

In areas where heavy snow is likely to fall, always carry a blanket in your car. Also, carry a torch, a brightly-coloured headscarf, matches, some chocolate bars, a flask of hot soup, a mobile phone and a sign that says HELP in big bright letters. If you break down or get stuck in snow, don�€�t leave your car it will get noticed before you will. Put the HELP sign in your window, tie the headscarf to your car’s aerial, turn off the engine and curl up in the blanket. Don�€�t run your car’s engine for more than a few minutes at a time and make sure its exhaust isn�€�t blocked with snow.
After severe weather

When the severe weather has passed, remember that it catches many people unaware every year in the UK, so always be prepared to keep safe and to help others.

http://www.redcross.org.uk/Donate%20Now

Northern Ireland Flood Response Numbers

Flooding Incident Line 0300 2000 100

The various authorities in Northern Ireland have response numbers manned 24 hours a day for use when flooding occurs:

Rivers Agency – if flooding is coming from rivers or overflowing watercourses:

  • Omagh – 028 8225 4900
  • Fermanagh – 028 6638 8529
  • Coleraine – 028 7034 2357
  • Lisburn – 028 9260 6100
  • Armagh – 028 3839 9111
  • Belfast – 028 9260 6100

Roads Service �€“ if flooding is coming from the roadway, footpath or blocked road gullies:

  • Eastern – 028 9025 3000
  • Northern – 028 7035 3202
  • Southern – 028 3752 9500
  • Western – 028 8225 4600

Water Service �€“ if flooding is coming from burst water mains or blocked sewers:

  • Waterline – 08457 44 00 88
  • Waterline text phone – 08457 02 32 06

A small leaflet with these numbers, coverage area maps and basic flood advice is available from the Rivers Agency or online in PDF format at: http://www.riversagencyni.gov.uk

American Red Cross hurricane preparedness page

US: FIND RED CROSS SHELTER (Nationwide) http://t.co/a7ocPSPO

Red Cross Hurricane App – Get it here:

rdcrss.org/MZR7Bg  http://lockerz.com/s/230306748

Let family members know you’re ok during times of disaster Red Cross Safe & Well site (link)

SaffirSimpson Hurricane Wind Scale

FEMA – Are You Ready? An In-depth Guide to Citizen Preparedness Full Document (PDF – 21Mb)

Preparaci��� para hurc���Cruz Roja Americana (Spanish-language version)

Philippines Red Cross Survival Tips for before, during and after a typhoon.

Before the typhoon:

Store an adequate supply of food and clean water. Prepare foods that need not be cooked.
Keep flashlights, candles and battery-powered radios within easy reach.
Examine your house and repair its unstable parts.
Always keep yourself updated with the latest weather report.
Harvest crops that can be yielded already.
Secure domesticated animals in a safe place.
For fisher folks, place boats in a safe area.
Should you need to evacuate, bring clothes, first aid kit, candles/flashlight, battery-powered radio, food, etc.

During the Typhoon:

Stay inside the house.
Always keep yourself updated with the latest weather report.
If safe drinking water is not available, boil water for at least 20 minutes. Place it in a container with cover.
Keep an eye on lighted candles or gas lamps.
Do not wade through floodwaters to avoid being electrocuted and contracting diseases.
If there is a need to move to an evacuation center, follow these reminders.
Evacuate calmly.
Close the windows and turn off the main power switch.
Put important appliances and belongings in a high ground.
Avoid the way leading to the river.

After the Typhoon:

If your house was destroyed, make sure that it is already safe and stable when you enter.
Beware of dangerous animals such as snakes that may have entered your house
Watch out for live wires or outlet immersed in water.
Report damaged electrical cables and fallen electric posts to the authorities”

In case of emergency, Red Cross Hotline: 143, 527-0000; OpCen Mobile: 09178068513
Follow verified Twitter feeds for the latest updates and advisories @dost_pagasa @govph @NDRRMC_OpCen @MMDA

– @philredcross

Philippines Red Cross Lifeline Kit

Hurricane and severe weather checklist for boaters

From the US National Hurricane Centre (NOAA):

000
NOUS44 KMOB 021401
PNSMOB
ALZ051>064-FLZ001>006-MSZ067-075-076-078-079-021800-

PUBLIC INFORMATION STATEMENT…HURRICANE AND TROPICAL STORM TIPS
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE MOBILE AL
900 AM CST THU JUNE 2 2011

HURRICANES AND TROPICAL STORMS…THINGS TO CONSIDER BEFORE…
DURING AND AFTER THE STORM

IT IS IMPORTANT TO KNOW THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A TROPICAL STORM OR
HURRICANE WATCH…AND A WARNING.

A WATCH MEANS THAT A TROPICAL STORM OR HURRICANE HAS BECOME A THREAT
TO COASTAL AREAS…AND IS USUALLY ISSUED ABOUT 48 HOURS BEFORE
EXPECTED LANDFALL. EVERYONE IN THE WATCH AREA SHOULD LISTEN FOR
CURRENT ADVISORIES…AND ACT PROMPTLY IF A WARNING IS ISSUED.

A TROPICAL STORM WARNING MEANS THAT WINDS OF 39 TO 73 MPH…AS WELL
AS HIGH TIDES AND  ROUGH SEAS…ARE EXPECTED IN A SPECIFIC COASTAL
AREA WITHIN 36 HOURS.

A HURRICANE WARNING MEANS THAT HURRICANE FORCE WINDS OF 74 MPH OR
GREATER…AS WELL AS HIGH TIDES AND ROUGH SEAS…ARE EXPECTED IN A
SPECIFIC COASTAL AREA WITHIN 36 HOURS.

PRECAUTIONARY ACTIONS SHOULD BEGIN IMMEDIATELY WHENEVER A WARNING IS
ISSUED.

BEFORE THE STORM…

STAY INFORMED BY MONITORING THE LATEST HURRICANE AND TROPICAL STORM
ADVISORIES. LISTEN TO RADIO AND TELEVISION REPORTS…AS WELL AS NOAA
WEATHER RADIO TO GET THE LATEST ADVISORY UPDATES.

LISTEN CAREFULLY TO LOCAL OFFICIALS AND EVACUATE THE AREA IF TOLD TO
DO SO. LEAVE LOW LYING OR COASTAL AREAS…AS WELL AS OFFSHORE
ISLANDS. THESE ARE THE LOCATIONS MOST PRONE TO STORM SURGE.  THE
STORM SURGE IS THE MOST DANGEROUS PART OF A HURRICANE OR TROPICAL
STORM. THE SURGE IS A DOME OF WATER THAT COMES ACROSS THE COAST AS
THE STORM MAKES LANDFALL. WATER LEVELS CAN RANGE FROM 5…TO AS MUCH
AS 25 FEET ABOVE NORMAL SEA LEVEL. SUPERIMPOSED ON THIS HIGH STORM
TIDE ARE LARGE WIND DRIVEN WAVES. NINE OUT OF TEN DEATHS RESULTING
FROM HURRICANES HAVE HISTORICALLY BEEN THE RESULT OF STORM SURGE.
IF YOU LIVE CLOSE TO THE COAST IN A MOBILE HOME YOU SHOULD EVACUATE
TO A MORE SUBSTANTIAL SHELTER…EVEN IF YOU ARE NOT IN A STORM SURGE
PRONE AREA.

IF EVACUATION IS NOT REQUIRED OR RECOMMENDED…STAY AT HOME IF YOUR
HOUSE IS STURDY AND ON HIGH GROUND. IF YOUR PLANS CALL FOR
EVACUATION…BE PREPARED TO GO TO SHELTERS…TO A NEARBY FRIENDS OR
RELATIVES HOME…OR TO CITIES WELL INLAND AWAY FROM THE STORM. IF
UTILIZING OFFICIAL SHELTERS…LEARN THEIR LOCATIONS BEFOREHAND AND
THE MOST DIRECT SAFE ROUTES TO GET TO THE SHELTER.

MAKE SURE YOU HAVE THE FOLLOWING SUPPLIES…

OBTAIN A PORTABLE…BATTERY OPERATED RADIO ALONG WITH A FRESH SUPPLY
OF BATTERIES. A RADIO WILL BE ONE OF YOUR MOST USEFUL SOURCES OF
INFORMATION.

OBTAIN SEVERAL FLASHLIGHTS WITH FRESH BATTERIES. USE OF CANDLES FOR
LIGHTING IS NOT RECOMMENDED FOR SAFETY REASONS.

HAVE ENOUGH EXTRA BATTERIES TO LAST FOR SEVERAL DAYS. THERE MAY BE
NO ELECTRICITY AFTER THE STORM.

HAVE A FULL TANK OF GASOLINE IN YOUR AUTOMOBILE. NEVER LET YOUR
VEHICLE GAS TANK BE LESS THAN HALF FULL DURING A HURRICANE OR
TROPICAL STORM THREAT. ELECTRICALLY OPERATED GAS PUMPS MAY FAIL
DURING THE STORM.

OBTAIN CANNED GOODS AND NON PERISHABLE FOODS. STORE PACKAGED FOODS
WHICH CAN BE PREPARED WITHOUT COOKING AND NEED NO REFRIGERATION…AS
THERE MAY BE NO ELECTRICITY OR GAS AFTER THE STORM. REFILL NEEDED
PRESCRIPTION MEDICATIONS.

OBTAIN CONTAINERS FOR DRINKING WATER. HAVE CLEAN…AIR TIGHT
CONTAINERS TO STORE A SUFFICIENT WATER SUPPLY FOR SEVERAL DAYS. THE
CITY WATER SUPPLY WILL POSSIBLY BE INTERRUPTED OR CONTAMINATED.

OBTAIN MATERIALS FOR PROTECTING GLASS OPENINGS. HAVE SHUTTERS OR
LUMBER FOR PROTECTING LARGE WINDOWS AND DOORS. USE MASKING TAPE ON
SMALL WINDOWS. PUTTING TAPE ON GLASS WINDOWS OR DOORS WILL NOT
PREVENT FLYING DEBRIS FROM BREAKING THE GLASS…BUT WILL MINIMIZE THE
SPREADING AND SHATTERING OF GLASS IF THE WINDOW DOES BREAK.

HAVE MATERIALS FOR EMERGENCY REPAIRS. YOUR INSURANCE POLICY MAY
COVER THE COST OF MATERIALS USED IN TEMPORARY REPAIRS…SO KEEP ALL
RECEIPTS. THESE WILL ALSO BE HELPFUL FOR ANY INCOME TAX DEDUCTIONS.

MOOR YOUR BOAT SECURELY OR MOVE IT TO SAFE SHELTER. SECURE OUTDOOR
OBJECTS OR BRING THEM INDOORS. BRING PETS INDOORS.

DURING THE TROPICAL STORM OR HURRICANE…

STAY INDOORS AND AWAY FROM WINDOWS AND DOORS. TAKE REFUGE IN A SMALL
INTERIOR ROOM.

BEWARE OF THE EYE OF THE STORM. THIS CALM CENTER OF THE STORM CAN BE
DECEPTIVE DUE TO ITS CLEARING SKY AND RELATIVELY CALM WINDS. THE
STORMS EYE IS BORDERED BY WINDS AND RAINS OF MAXIMUM FORCE THAT WILL
INCREASE RAPIDLY AND FROM THE OPPOSITE DIRECTION TO THE WINDS AND
RAINS PRIOR TO THE ARRIVAL OF THE EYE. MINOR EMERGENCY REPAIRS MAY
BE POSSIBLE WITH THE PASSAGE OF THE EYE IF NECESSARY…BUT IN GENERAL
ONE SHOULD NOT VENTURE OUT OF SAFE SHELTER INTO THE EYE OF THE
STORM…AS RAPIDLY DETERIORATING CONDITIONS WILL FOLLOW.

AFTER THE STORM HAS PASSED…

IF YOU NEED TO USE AN ALTERNATE SOURCE OF ELECTRICITY FOR YOUR
HOME…BE CAREFUL. OBSERVE ALL SAFETY PRECAUTIONS TO AVOID CARBON
MONOXIDE POISONING…ELECTROCUTION…OR A FIRE. PORTABLE GENERATORS
SHOULD ONLY BE OPERATED OUTDOORS IN A DRY AND WELL VENTILATED AREA.
NEVER OPERATE A PORTABLE GENERATOR INDOORS.

IF YOU EVACUATED TO A PUBLIC SHELTER…REMAIN THERE UNTIL YOU ARE
TOLD THAT IS SAFE TO RETURN HOME. LISTEN TO YOUR LOCAL RADIO OR
TELEVISION FOR ADVICE AND INSTRUCTIONS FROM THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT
OFFICIALS REGARDING FOOD…HOUSING…AND OTHER FORMS OF ASSISTANCE.

DO NOT DRIVE UNLESS NECESSARY. THE STREETS ARE LIKELY TO BE FILLED
WITH DEBRIS AND DOWNED POWER LINES. ROADS SHOULD BE PRIMARILY
RESERVED FOR EMERGENCY VEHICLES AND ESSENTIAL RESCUE AND RECOVERY
WORK.

AVOID LOOSE OR DANGLING WIRES AND REPORT THEM TO YOUR LOCAL ELECTRIC
COMPANY AS SOON AS POSSIBLE. REPORT ALL BROKEN OR DAMAGED
WATER…SEWER…GAS…AND ELECTRICAL LINES.

HURRICANES MOVING INLAND CAN CAUSE SEVERE FLOODING DUE TO HEAVY
RAINFALL. STAY AWAY FROM RIVER BANKS…CREEKS…OR STREAMS. WHEN
DRIVING…DO NOT DRIVE INTO AREAS WHERE WATER COVERS THE
ROADWAY…THE WATER MAY BE TOO DEEP TO SAFELY NAVIGATE.
REMEMBER…LIVE TO DRIVE ANOTHER DAY. TURN AROUND…DONT DROWN.

IF YOU LEFT YOUR HOME FOR THE STORM…CAUTIOUSLY RE-ENTER UPON
RETURNING AFTER THE STORM HAS PASSED. CHECK FOR GAS LEAKS…FOOD
SPOILAGE…WATER AND WIND DAMAGE.

……………………………………………………………

DISCUSS HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS WITH YOUR FAMILY. SHARE YOUR IDEAS
WITH FRIENDS…NEIGHBORS AND RELATIVES. HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS IS A
JOB FOR EVERYONE IN THE COMMUNITY.

FOR ADDITIONAL HELP OR ASSISTANCE ON HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS…
PLEASE CONTACT YOUR LOCAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY OR YOUR LOCAL
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE OFFICE. IT IS BEST TO FORMULATE YOUR
PREPAREDNESS PLAN WELL IN ADVANCE OF A STORM SYSTEM…DO NOT WAIT
UNTIL THE LAST MINUTE.

NOTE…FOR PEOPLE WHO MAY HAVE WEATHER EQUIPMENT AT THEIR HOMES OR
BUSINESSES…PLEASE MAKE SURE YOUR EQUIPMENT IS WORKING PROPERLY.
AFTER THE STORM HAS PASSED…PLEASE RELAY YOUR HIGHEST OBSERVED WIND
SPEED AND DIRECTION…YOUR LOWEST SEA LEVEL PRESSURE AND RAINFALL
TOTALS…AND THE TIMES OF OCCURRENCE OF THESE PARAMETERS…TO YOUR
MOBILE WEATHER SERVICE OFFICE AT 251-633-6443.

Dr. Ali Khan, Director of CDC’s Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response, offers a few tips for those in the US –

Add a weather radio to your emergency kit

A new tool for checking on families and friends after disasters from @PHEgov http://facebook.com/phegov

My motto is: Get a Kit, Make a Plan, Be Informed AND Check on Your Neighbors!

Learn about the tornado warning system of your area. Most have a siren system. U can also check for txt alerts

Phone lines may be jammed during an emergency, texting rather than calling can ensure ur message is delivered.

water and food for 3 days, Rx meds, weather radio, flashlight, & batteries. Complete list:
http://emergency.cdc.gov/preparedness/kit/disasters/

ARE YOU READY? FACT SHEETS TO HELP PREPARE FOR EMERGENCIES

workHurricanes SpanishNuclear fact sheetLandslides fact sheetKids tipsVaccines adults �€� Tornadoes: How to get ready for a tornado (PDF) English or Spanish�€� Hurricanes: Getting ready for hurricanes (PDF) English or Spanish�€� Tsunamis: How to prepare for a tsunami English or Spanish�€� Earthquakes: How to get ready for earthquakes (PDF) English or Spanish�€�Floods: How to get ready for floods (PDF) English or Spanish�€�Wildfires: How to get ready for a heat wave (PDF) English or Spanish�€�Heat waves: How to get ready for a heat wave (PDF) English or Spanish�€�Landslides: How to get ready for a landslide (PDF) English or Spanish�€�Volcanoes: How to get ready for a volcano (PDF) English or Spanish�€�Winter storms: How to get ready for a winter storm (PDF) English or Spanish�€�Chemical exposures: How to avoid chemical exposure during a disaster (PDF) English or Spanish�€�Power outages: How to get ready for power outages (PDF) English or Spanish�€� Sheltering in place: What you need to know to stay put during a disaster English or Spanish�€�Mosquitoes: How to stay safe from mosquito-borne diseases English or Spanish�€�Safe buildings: How your building is constructed matters during a disaster English or Spanish�€� Home disasters: Tips for preventing a disaster at home English or Spanish�€� Work: How to get ready for an emergency at work (PDF) English or Spanish�€�Food and water safety during disaster: How to keep food safety during and after a disaster (PDF) English or Spanish

�€�Mass event safety: How to stay safe during a mass event (PDF) English or Spanish

�€�Nuclear and radiation safety: How to get ready for a nuclear or radiological disaster (PDF) English or Spanish

�€�Seniors and preparedness: Tips to help seniors prepare for disasters (PDF) English or Spanish

�€�School preparedness: Information for preparedness at schools (PDF) English or Spanish

�€�Kids and preparedness: Information for kids on preparedness, written at child level (PDF) English or Spanish

�€�Moms and disasters: Pregnant women, women who are breastfeeding, or women who have infants have special disaster planning needs. (PDF) English or Spanish

�€�Parents and preparedness: Learn how you can keep your family safe during emergencies. (PDF) English or Spanish

�€�Mental health and disasters: Disasters can be hard on mental health. Learn how you can stay well. (PDF) English or Spanish

�€�Vaccines: General information: Find out how vaccines keep us safe from diseases. (PDF) English or Spanish

�€�Vaccines: Kids: It’s especially important that kids get vaccines. See why. (PDF) English or Spanish

�€�Vaccines: Teens: Teens have their own set of vaccination needs. (PDF) English or Spanish

�€�Vaccines: Adults: Adults and seniors still need vaccines, some of them annually. (PDF) English or Spanish

�€�Driving & disasters: What to do if a disaster happens when you are on the road. (PDF) English or Spanish

 

FREE MATERIALS TO HELP YOU CREATE AN EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS STOCKPILE

Get Ready: Set Your Clocks, Check Your Stocks
�€� Get the facts: Why do I need an emergency stockpile? English or Spanish (PDFs)�€� Checklist: What should I put in my stockpile? English or Spanish (PDFs)�€�Shopping list: What should I shop for? Grocery list (PDF)�€�Recipes: What can I make to eat during a disaster? Recipes (PDF)�€� Water stockpiling: How much water should I store? English or Spanish�€�Pets: How can I prepare my pets for emergencies? English or Spanish(PDFs)�€� Budget stockpiling: How can I stockpile without spending a lot? English or Spanish (PDFs)�€� Cold & flu supplies: What do I need to have on hand for a cold or the flu? English or Spanish(PDFs)�€� Food Drive Toolkit: Help your community be prepared for disasters: Hold a food drive! Download our toolkit(PDF) on how to hold a food drive.Full Toolkit (PDF) (Contains all the items listed above in English in a single document).�€� Get Set: An Emergency Preparedness Project Kit A how-to guide for high school students English or Spanish (PDFs)

One thought on “BE READY FOR BAD WEATHER and other emergencies – Advice and resources

  1. Pingback: Flash Flooding in Cork, Ireland – Published 28 June 2012 1250 GMT/UTC | Goaty's News

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