UK (Wales): Criccieth lifeboat aids to grounded yacht on Harlech beach – Published 04 Apr 2017 1455z (GMT/UTC)

“At 10.30am, volunteer Crew Members from Criccieth’s RNLI Lifeboat Station were requested to launch following multiple reports of a yacht aground at the northern end of Harlech beach.

RNLI/Ifer Gwyn

The yacht, named Thimble and approximately 30ft in length, had gotten into difficulties near the mouth of the Porthmadog Estuary whilst attempting to navigate upriver.

Following initial calls, members of both Criccieth and Harlech HM Coastguard Teams had been deployed to assist, however with the yacht unable to refloat, it was decided to call Criccieth Lifeboat.

The Station’s Atlantic 85 Lifeboat, Doris Joan, was quickly on scene. However, the Crew were unable to attach a towline due to the ebbing tide and large waves at the foreshore. During this period, HM Coastguard had received further calls reporting a yacht in difficulty further south and requested that Barmouth RNLI launch their lifeboats. It quickly became apparent that these reports related to the same vessel; accordingly Barmouth Lifeboat’s inshore rescue boat was returned to Station whilst the all-weather Lifeboat continued towards Harlech in the hope that they could attach a rocket-line to tow the yacht. Once on-scene and following discussion with the Criccieth’s Lifeboat Crew it was decided that both vessels stood-by until high water, as the occupant was safely ashore.

After being afloat for 3 hours, the Crew of Criccieth Lifeboat were stood-down and returned to shore.” -RNLI

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Humber lifeboat & Coastguard aid yacht in distress – 081112 2315z

Tuesday (6 November 2012) saw the crew of the Humber lifeboat called into action after a distress call was made to the coastguard from a yacht suffering difficulties.

(Photo: RNLI/Ben Mitchell)
Humber RNLI treat sick crew member whilst assisting an 11m sailing vessel

The yachts steering had broken, making her unable to control; the call to the coastguard described the vessel ‘going around in circles’ and becoming disorientated and unable to pass a precise location.

Humber RNLI and a crew of six were launched at 2:21pm and using the information from the yacht and a passing transfer vessel were able to make best speed to an estimated location. They were then able to locate the stricken vessel and its two crew approximately thirteen miles South West of the lifeboat station.

A crew member from the lifeboat was put aboard to asses the situation and check the condition of the two crew. Once aboard it became apparent that one of the crew members of the yacht was suffering from the effects of seasickness.

Ben Mitchell one of the crew members at Humber RNLI was put aboard:

‘Once aboard, it was immediately apparent that one of the crew was in a particularly bad way suffering with seasickness. After discussion with the lifeboat Coxswain it was decided the best course of action would be to transfer the casualty on to the lifeboat were he would be able to receive the best possible care.’

Once the casualty was secure and stabilised aboard the lifeboat a tow line was passed and the yacht taken in tow back to Grimsby. The lifeboat kept in contact with Humber coastguard and arranged for a coastguard team to meet the lifeboat at Grimsby.

Ben continued:

‘Although the casualty’s condition was much improved on the journey home we decided to request a Coastguard team to meet us so they could ensure the casualty was alright and pass him on to the relevant medical professionals.’

The Humber lifeboat was back on its moorings, refuelled and ready for the next rescue mission by 7:25pm after over five hours at sea. This was the 32nd lifeboat call out in 2012 for the crew at Humber RNLI.

As a registered charity the RNLI relies on voluntary donations and legacies from the public for its income.

US: 1 dead, 4 missing after 4 crew from race yacht swept overboard, then boat sent onto rocks

“A powerful wave swept four crew members off a sailboat during a race near San Francisco, leaving one person dead and four others missing, the Coast Guard said early Sunday.

The eight-member crew aboard the 38-foot Low Speed Chase was participating in a yacht race from San Francisco Bay around the Farallon Islands on Saturday afternoon as their craft ran aground. Seas were running high at 10-12 feet when the Low Speed Chase was hit by a larger wave and the four were washed overboard, Coast Guard Petty Officer Levi Read said.

“They turned the boat around to go rescue those people and they got hit by another wave,” sending the boat onto rocks, he said.

A Mayday call reporting the accident went out at about 3 p.m. PDT. Coast Guard and National Guard helicopters and water craft rescued three crew members who were clinging to rocks, Read said. The body of the other crew member was pulled from the water.

A Coast Guard helicopter, a cutter and a smaller boat were searching the waters around the islands, 27 miles west of San Francisco, as well as shoreline areas early Sunday for the missing crew members. Dozens of boats were registered for the Full Crew Farallones Race, running from the St. Francis Yacht Club on San Francisco Bay to the islands and back, about 60 miles round trip, Read said.

Rescuers found the three crew members on or near the shore clinging to rocks, about 300 feet from where their vessel was breaking up because of the powerful waves, he said.

They were wearing life vests and cold weather gear — equipment that gave rescuers hope in the search for the missing. “There is the possibility that the other four were also in the same kind of gear,” Read said. He said he didn’t know if the four missing were the same crew members who were swept from the boat. The search was expected to continue through the night, as long as there was a chance there were survivors, the Coast Guard said.

The names of the eight crew members were not released, and there was no immediate word on the condition of the three survivors. The Yacht Racing Association of San Francisco Bay expressed sympathy for the dead crew member and hope for those missing. “We offer our thoughts and prayers to the family and friends of the missing crew in hopes they are returned home safely,” the association said in a statement on its website.

The San Francisco Chronicle reported that the Low Speed Chase is based out of the San Francisco Yacht Club, located in Marin County’s Belvedere Cove. The manager of the club declined immediate comment.”

Sunday, 15 April, 2012 at 15:08 (03:08 PM) UTC RSOE

The Low Speed Chase, shown in 2009, ran aground near the Farallon Islands during a race that started in San Francisco.

 

US Coast Guard assist Clipper Race yacht in Pacific after 4 crew injured – Updated 01 April 2012

US Coast Guard launch operation to assist yacht competing in Clipper Round the World Yacht Race after injuries sustained in heavy seas: Para-jumpers to be despatched and container vessel diverted to assist.

Yacht Geraldton Western Australia hit by large wave in storm, 4 crew injured, 3 Brits 1 Aus., Lost steering. See:

http://www.sail-world.com/UK/US-Coastguard-to-the-rescue-after-Cllipper-Round-the-World-injuries/95502

“An attempt was made to parachute medical help to the sailors but it was abandoned after poor weather conditions meant paramedics were unable to jump out of the aircraft.

A helicopter will now be sent to help. It will launch from a coast guard ship to deliver medical supplies. Subject to their medical condition, the injured crew will be taken off the yacht.

Explaining the revised plan, US coast guard spokesman Levi Read said: “They will then lower an emergency medical technician from the helicopter on to the boat. He will assess the injuries, treat them and if necessary evacuate the injured people and take them aboard the helicopter to the nearest medical resource.”

The yacht is heading towards Oakland, San Francisco Bay, under secondary steering and is expected to reach land within two or three days.” – http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk