UK: Most hillgoers unprepared for emergencies, Ordnance Survey study reveals – Published 30 Jun 2017 1400z (GMT/UTC)

 Most hillgoers unprepared for emergencies, Ordnance Survey study reveals

“A study by Britain’s national mapping agency has revealed many hillgoers are clueless about what to do if things went wrong.

Ordnance Survey said one in eight of people asked would not know how to deal with a mountain emergency if they had no phone signal.

And three-quarters of recreational walkers don’t plan their route properly or pack the right gear, the survey found.

The figures were released as OS announced it was teaming up with Mountain Rescue England and Wales, the umbrella body for voluntary teams south of the border, to try to reduce outdoor incidents.

There were only 14 days last year where a mountain rescue team in England and Wales wasn’t called out.

In 2016 MREW attended 1,812 callouts, up 170 on the previous year, of which 360 were serious or fatal. Mountain bike incidents also continued to rise in 2016, though not at the same rate as previous years.

OS’s survey of more than 2,000 adults from across Great Britain who enjoy recreational walking and hiking highlighted the need for a more safety-minded approach when venturing outdoors.

A total of 83 per cent of those questioned admitted that if they were in trouble on a mountain and had no phone signal they wouldn’t know what to do. It also revealed how more and more walkers and hikers, especially those from younger generations, are not carrying paper maps, compasses or whistles, and are relying entirely on the functionality of their mobile phones, even though only 28 per cent of all respondents would think to check in advance the availability of a mobile phone signal in the place to where they are heading…..” – Bob Smith, Editor of grough magazine
Thursday 29 June 2017 06:39 PM GMT Click for full story

Calling the emergency services from a mobile phone (Advice from Dartmoor Rescue)

The short video gives important information about dialing the emergency services from a mobile phone in the event of an accident. It answers important questions such as:

  • what�s the difference between 999 and 112?
  • How can you call when your mobile phone is showing no signal?
  • Or if somebody in your party is unconscious and their�s is the only mobile, �how can you bypass the phone security to make that important call and potentially save their life?

All this and more is explained simply and clearly.

So be prepared and watch the video as it could save the life or a family member of friend.

�Help Me� The Secrets of using 112 on a mobile phone in an emergency/accident

You need to register your mobile phone before being able to alert the emergency services, including mountain and cave rescue, via SMS text message. �This is best done�before�you need help. You can register by sending an SMS text message from your mobile phone as follows:

(Goaty: Suggest better to register with 112 rather than 999 � why? see video, but why not both)

sms999.001 - Version 2

More information can be found at the following website:�http://www.emergencysms.org.uk/

“Help Me” The Secrets of using a PLB (Personal Locator Beacon) in an emergency/accident

https://lh3.ggpht.com/_D_E5598eI3o/TSm5QDx_3vI/AAAAAAAACCk/aym4dYflxxg/s1600/mountainrescue.jpgGeneral Mountain/Moorland Advice from Mountain Rescue England & Wales:

Mountains and moorlands can be treacherous places without proper care and there are many, many ways to enjoy the mountain environment, be it walking, climbing, running, cycling or skiing. There�s no subsititute for experience, but there are steps you can take to minimise the chances of getting lost or hurt.

Prepare and plan

  • Develop the mountain skills you need to judge potential hazard, including the ability to read a map.
  • Think about the equipment, experience, capabilities and enthusiasm of your party members, taking into account the time of year, the terrain and the nature of the trip � and choose your routes accordingly.
  • Learn the basic principles of first aid � airway, breathing, circulation and the recovery position. It could make the difference between life and death.

Wear suitable clothing and footwear

  • Wear suitable footwear with a treaded sole, and which provides support for ankles.
  • Clothing should be colourful, warm, windproof and waterproof and always carry spare, including hat and gloves (even in summer the tops and open moorland can still be bitingly cold, and it�s always colder the higher you climb).

Carry food and drink�

  • Take ample food and drink for each member of the party. High energy food such as chocolate and dried fruit are ideal for a quick hit.
  • In cold, wet weather a warm drink is advisable, and always carry water � even in cool weather it�s easy to become dehydrated.
  • Of course, large quantities of water can weight heavy in the rucksack, so take a smaller water bottle and top up when you can � streams on hills are drinkable if fast-running over stony beds.

�and the right equipment

  • A map and compass are essential kit and should be easily accessible � not buried in the rucksack!
  • A mobile phone and GPS are useful tools but don�t rely on your mobile to get you out of trouble � in may areas of the mountains there is no signal coverage.
  • Take a whistle and learn the signal for rescue. Six good long blasts. Stop for one minute. Repeat. Carry on the whistle blasts until someone reaches you and don�t stop because you�ve heard a reply � rescuers may be using your blasts as a direction finder.
  • A torch (plus spare batteries and bulbs) is a must. Use it for signalling in the same pattern as for whistle blasts.
  • At least one reliable watch in the party.
  • Cllimbers and mountain bikers should wear a helmet. In winter conditions, an ice-axe, crampons and survival bag are essential.
  • Emergency survival kit comprising spare clothing and a bivvi bag.
  • New OrdnanceSurvey free smartphone app OSLocate will help walkers in a fix http://www.grough.co.uk/magazine/2014/03/24/ordnance-survey-free-smartphone-app-will-help-walkers-in-a-fix

Before you set out

  • Charge your phone battery! Many accidents occur towards the end of the day when both you and your phone may be low on energy.
  • Check the weather forecast and local conditions. Mountains can be major undertakings and, in the winter months, night falls early.
  • Eat well before you start out.
  • Leave your route plan including start and finish points, estimated time of return and contact details with an appropriate party.

On the hill

  • Keep an eye on the weather and be prepared to turn back if conditions turn against you, even if this upsets a long planned adventure.
  • Make sure party leaders are experienced. Keep together, allow the slowest member of the party to determine the pace, and take special care of the youngest and weakest in dangerous places.
  • Watch for signs of hypothermia, particularly in bad weather � disorientation, shivering, tiredness, pale complexion and loss of circulation in hands or toes, discarding of vital clothing. Children and older people are especially susceptible.
  • If you prefer to go alone, be aware of the additional risk. Let people know your route before you start, stick to it as far as you can and notify them of any changes.
  • If you think you need mountain rescue, get a message to the Police (112/999) as soon as possible and keep injured/exhausted people safe and warm until help reaches you.

Dangers you can avoid

  • Precipices and unstable boulder.
  • Slopes of ice or steep snow, and snow cornices on ridges or gully tops.
  • Very steep grass slopes, especially if frozen or wet.
  • Gullies, gorges and stream beds, and streams in spate.
  • Exceeding your experience and abilities and loss of concentration.

Dangers you need to monitor

  • Weather changes � mist gale, rain and snow may be sudden and more extreme than forecast.
  • Ice on path (know how to use an ice-axe and crampons).
  • Excessive cold or heat (dress appropriately and carry spare clothing!).
  • Exhaustion (know the signs, rest and keep warm).
  • Passage of time � especially true when under pressure � allow extra time in winter or night time conditions.

Check out the Safe in the Hills website � pioneered by the Kirkby Stephen MRT, for more information about how you can keep safe whilst walking in the hills.

How to take care of your feet when hiking�. The key recommendations are:

  • Choose the right hiking boots
  • Trim your toenails
  • Soften any tough skin (which are subject to hard to treat deep blisters)
  • Rest feet when walking

�Avoiding and treating foot blisters for hikers�, as well as giving some useful advice on how to treat blisters, highlights the importance of changing your (decent walking) socks when they get wet

  1. Make sure you have a decent pair of boots
  2. Take plenty of decent hiking socks
  3. Change your socks when they get damp (if you do this as early as possible you have a fighting chance to dry them in your sleeping bag)
  4. Regularly let your feet rest and breath
  5. Regularly apply talc to your feet
  6. If it is raining or very damp, wear gaiters to stop water getting into your boots

Do this and your feet, the most important hiking equipment you have, will thank you!

(Stolen from http://philsorrell.com/2010/03/01/importance-of-foot-care-whilst-hiking/)

Do not use any information on this site for life or death decisions. All information is intended as supplementary to official sources. Kindly refer to your country’s official weather agency/government website for local warnings, advisories and bulletins.

Ebola Pandemic Reports – A Possible World Nightmare

TheSurvivalPlaceBlog

ebola-global-pandemic

By Ken Jorgustin

Since last week when we wrote about the Ebola outbreak in context of a biololgical weapon – as well as the nightmare scenario it could bring upon the world given our criss-crossing global airlines system, Ebola Biological Warfare – A Pandemic Nightmare, the deadly virus appears to be expanding even more out of control while even the mainstream media is now widely reporting on it.

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10 Essential Skills Necessary for Survival

TheSurvivalPlaceBlog

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Although it is important to be prepared for disaster situations, many are not adequately trained to handle the disaster situations in which they find themselves in. Having the proper skills and training will provide an individual with a well diversified knowledge base on how to survive during and after a disaster.

Medical Training

In a survival situation, medical training is going to be a big one.  Due to the increase use of saws, axes and knives, there will be more medical emergencies involving deep lacerated cuts.  Knowing how to properly clean wounds, stitch wounds, as well as knowing how to treat infected wounds will be extremely important.  Additionally, there will be an increase in burns from being in closer contact to fires.  Burns can get infected very quickly, and knowing how to decipher the degree of the burn is and how to treat it will be a concern amongst survivalists and preppers.  Typically, there are online…

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New Zealand boat capsize highlights need to wear lifejackets: Family of 3 rescued but 13 year old boy missing – 190113 1450z

https://i2.wp.com/www.calypso-boating.com/index_htm_files/2107.png

At 0637 hours this morning Coastguard received a call on VHF Marine Radio Channel 80 from a member of the public who had come across a capsized vessel off Calypso Bay, near Motuhie Island, in Auckland’s Hauraki Gulf.

The small 4.4m run about Tantifi’ had left Buckland’s Beach up the Tamaki River earlier that morning with 4 persons on board.

They got into trouble whilst passing Coruso Rock where a wave resulted in a sudden shift by a person on board, causing the vessel’s starboard bow to plough into the next wave and capsize the vessel.

All on board were thrown into the water with one surfacing under the vessel.

None were wearing life jackets, however had them in their vessel.

The member of the public started to recover the 4 persons who were all accounted for from the water with Coastguard Rescue Vessels from Howick, Waiheke and Auckland arriving on scene shortly after.

Two of the persons on board were treated by Coastguard volunteers for small injuries while the vessel was recovered and taken under tow back to Buckland’s Beach.

As a 13 year old boy still remains missing following the capsize of the small boat he was on with 3 other family members on Thursday, Coastguard puts out a plea for those New Zealander’s out enjoying the many water ways in and around our coastline to do so safely and to not just take lifejackets but to wear them.

Coastguard Spokesperson, Georgie Smith, said Coastguard can’t stress enough the importance of not just taking lifejackets on a boat trip but wearing them.

“Boats, especially under 6m, can sink very quickly – it’s simple, lifejackets save lives! Not only are you easy to find, but your survival rate is just huge in comparison to not wearing one. How much is a life worth?”

Mrs Smith said safety messages were stressed throughout the year but many people still don’t take them seriously.

“We can only do so much – our volunteers are out there dedicating their time and risking their lives to save others. People need to make sure they are looking out for themselves and that means a correctly fitted lifejacket for everyone on board, and wearing them, especially in small vessels.”

Supported by Giltrap Group’, Coastguard Northern Region re-launches their life jacket awareness events next month at high population boat ramps around Auckland.

Saturday, 19 January, 2013 at 11:24 (11:24 AM) UTC RSOE

Survival doubtful for Vietnam elephants

DAK LAK

Wild elephants could disappear from Viet Nam’s Central Highlands permanently as deforestation has destroyed their habitat and source of food needed for survival.

Their survival in the country remains doubtful as plans for a preservation project remain only on paper and forests continue to be cut down for rubber, coffee and cassava plantations.

In 2006, the Prime Minister approved an action plan for elephant conservation in the three provinces of Nghe An, Dong Nai and Dak Lak.

In the Central Highland province of Dak Lak alone, around 100 wild elephants live in districts of Buon Don and Ea Sup.

The province’s People’s Committee signed a project in 2010 to preserve elephants in the province through 2015, with the total budget of VND61 billion (US$2.9 million).

Nevertheless, between March 26 and 31, police and forest-protection forces from the province’s Ea Sup District found three dead elephants.

A 150-kg elephant was found in Cu M’Lan commune, and six days later, the bodies of two other elephants, one weighing 400-500 kg and the other two tonnes, were found in the same commune.

Vice director of the province’s Agriculture and Rural Development and head of Forest Protection Division, Y Rit Buon Ya, said that several elephants in the area had been hunted as food, and others had died of accidents or eaten inappropriate food.

The illegal killing of wild elephants for their tusks and tails is common in some provinces.

Y Rit said that last year, the Dak Lak Elephant Conservation Centre was established as part of a protection plan expected to assist local people with nursing their domesticated elephants, as well as to oversee and protect wild ones.

However, so far, the projects has yet to provide any intervention.

Huynh Trung Luan, director of the centre, said that a budget and staff shortfall have delayed the project.

The centre received VND350 million ($16,800) out of the VND61 billion ($2.9 million), but the money is not enough to pay the salaries of the centre’s six officials, according to Luan.

The centre was planned to be built on 200ha, including 100ha for breeding the animal and planting food for them. The other 100ha would contain an elephant medical centre.

The province has asked to use 163ha of Yok Don National Park to build the centre, but the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development rejected the proposal.

According to the ministry, the land located in the area needs to be strictly protected.

The province is considering using 200ha of protected forest in Don Village to develop the centre.

Central Highland University’s associate professor and Dr Bao Huy, a consultant in the elephant preservation project, said that conservationists and authorities should be aware of their responsibility for elephant deaths regardless of the cause.

According to a survey by the project consultancy group, in 2009, the province had 61 domesticated elephants and about 80-110 wild elephants. The project targets three main pillars: healthcare and reproductive health assistance to domesticated elephants, preservation and expansion of the wild elephant population, and conservation of elephant culture in Central Highland.

Huy said that besides complicated administrative procedures and fund shortages, insufficient human resources posed a difficulty to project implementation.

Moreover, nearly all the urgent actions recommended in the project study had not yet been carried out, Huy said.

“A drastic measure to protect wild elephants would be to make the forests where elephants live completely protected conservation areas,” he said, adding that the elephants needed huge spaces to live and grow.

Meanwhile, domesticated elephants should be taken in for medical assistance and for male and female elephants to breed, rather than live separately and over-serve local tourism. VNS