South Africa: 2 Men swept off rocks rescued, seriously injured, at Plettenberg Bay – Published 170515 1913z (GMT/UTC)

At 14h18 on Sunday the 17th of May, NSRI Plettenberg bay duty crew were activated following reports from an ex NSRI crewman, Dr. Herman Nel, reporting that he and his family had come across a situation, while hiking on the Robberg Nature Reserve hiking trail, where two men had been swept off rocks at Robberg Nature reserve hiking trail. One man was missing and one man seriously injured. The injured man was with some hikers, believed to be from Canada, who had found him.
Dr. Nel began emergency treatment on the 39 year old man who was suffering multiple lacerations, severe bruising to his body, arms and legs, and suspected fractures to an right arm and a leg.
Dr. Nel was able to determine from the 39 year old that he and his 34 year old friend (both from Vanderbijlpark and on holiday in Plettenberg Bay) were taking pictures of the sea. The 39 year old man had walked up a section at Blaas Gat, Robberg Nature Reserve, when a wave swept him off the rocks into the sea.
The 34 year old man, seeing his friend swept off the rocks and into the water had jumped into the water to try to help him but was swept, in very rough sea conditions, into a gulley.
The 39 year old man, had managed to get out of the water onto rocks but having lost sight of his friend, and fearing that his friend had drowned, crawled over rocks towards the beach to try to find help when a group of hikers, believed to be Canadians, came across him and shortly after that Dr. Nel, his wife, his daughter and a friend of his daughter, came across the scene.
Dr. Nel and the daughters friend, Andre Barnard, went in search of the 34 year old man, and during that time they also went to a higher part of “The Island”, at Robberg Nature Reserve, to make a call to NSRI Plettenberg Bay to raise the alarm. At that stage it was reported as a suspected drowning in progress.
Dr. Nel and Andre Barnard then found the 34 year old man in amongst rocks in a gulley in the sea and being battered by swells in a rising sea tide and suffering multiple lacerations, bruising, a head injury and a suspected fractured spine.
Together they managed to move him to higher ground and out of danger.
Dr. Nel was also able to confirm to the responding crews that the missing man had now been found.
At that stage the first of NSRI Plettenberg Bay rescue crew who had responded by road were arriving on the scene followed by NSRI crew who had responded by sea aboard the sea rescue craft LEONARD SMITH and by paramedics from WC Government Health EMS and Med-Life ambulance services.
The 34 year old man was in an area that was threatened by the rising high tide and he was secured to a trauma board. Because the rising high tide and rough sea conditions threatened to engulf the area where he was being treated rescuers carried him to a higher point of the Nature Reserve.
The AMS/EMS Skymed helicopter that had been activated from Oudtshoorn was en route to the scene having picked up two NSRI Air Sea Rescue volunteers who had earlier been taking part in an Air Sea Rescue exercise at NSRI Wilderness.
On arrival on the scene the Skymed helicopter static line hoisted the 34 year old man, who was suffering a suspected fractured spine and multiple lacerations and bruising, secured into a specialised hoisting stretcher, to the Robberg Nature Reserve car park where paramedics continued with medical treatment.
The 39 year old man with the suspected fractured arm and leg as well as lacerations and bruising, was then also static line hoisted to the Robberg car park.
The 39 year old man was transported by ambulance to hospital in Plettenberg Bay in a serious but stable condition.
He has been stabilised and is being transferred to hospital in George.
The 34 year old man has been airlifted by the Skymed helicopter to hospital in George in a serious but stable condition and has been admitted to surgery. – NSRI
Picture by AMS pilot Stephan Rossouw 9VIA nsri0

Picture by AMS pilot Stephan Rossouw 9VIA nsri0

South Africa: Young male surfer, 20, bitten by White Shark in Muizenberg – Multi-agency response – Published 010814 1715z (UTC)

“At 14h07, Friday, 01 August, NSRI Simonstown volunteer sea rescue duty crew and CMR (Cape Medical Response) were activated following reports of a man bitten by a shark while surfing off-shore of the Pavilion, Muizenberg Beach.

The man was reported to have been assisted out of the water.

NSRI Simonstown volunteers, CMR paramedics and a CMR ambulance, the SA Police Services, WC Government Health EMS, City of Cape Town Law Enforcement, Cape Town Fire and Rescue Services and the Red Cross AMS Skymed helicopter responded.

NSRI Strandfontein were placed on alert.

On arrival on-scene a 20 year old male, from Newlands (originally from Durban), was found to be in a stable condition with multiple lacerations to his lower limbs (some of which are deep lacerations) and an avulsion to the left thigh.

A member of the public had begun first aid treatment on the scene prior to paramedics arriving and the member of the public had cut the surf board leash from the surfers surf board and had tied the leash around the patients limbs to act as a tourniquet to stem the flow of blood.

The man has been airlifted by the Skymed helicopter to hospital in a stable condition for further treatment.

He was assisted out of the water by his friend.

At the time of the incident the Shark Spotters were flying the Black Shark Flag (indicating poor water and weather visibility conditions – a misty haze) and a bystander had approached the shark spotters to inform them that they had seen a shark fin in the water and the incident happened when the Shark Siren (indicating swimmers and surfers to clear the water) was in the process of being activated.

Shark Spotters and Law Enforcement officers have closed Muizenberg Beach and bathers and surfers along the False Bay coastline are urged to exercise caution.

The species of shark involved has been confirmed by the bite marks to have been a White Shark and eye-witness accounts suggest the shark to have been between 3 and 4 meters in length but the length of the shark cannot be confirmed pending further investigations.

These pictures are low resolution but are available on Sea Rescue’s Flickr page.

” – NSRI

At 14h07, Friday, 01 August, NSRI Simon's Town volunteer sea rescue duty crew and CMR (Cape Medical Response) were activated following reports of a man bitten by a shark while surfing off-shore of the Pavilion, Muizenberg Beach.

At 14h07, Friday, 01 August, NSRI Simon's Town volunteer sea rescue duty crew and CMR (Cape Medical Response) were activated following reports of a man bitten by a shark while surfing off-shore of the Pavilion, Muizenberg Beach.

 

South Africa: 11 illegal miners rescued from abandoned gold mine shaft in Benoni nr Johannesburg, unknown number refuse to come up fearing arrest – 160214 1725z

Latest: About 10 miners have been rescued alive, more are coming up rapidly

(1554z – Alex Crawford Sky News)
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(Crane being moved into position to remove a large boulder)

Emergency and rescue services have been busy for over six hours trying to free trapped illegal miners outside Benoni CBD on Johannesburgs East Rand.

It is understood they were trapped since early yesterday.

Since early this morning paramedics and rescuers joined forces to set up a plan on how to free them. Numerous heavy duty rescue vehicles and equipment was brought to the old mine shaft to stabilise the ground.

Shortly before 15:00 rescue workers managed to lift the first large rock from the small opening and are hopeful that they will be able to reach some of the miners in die course.

According to local Ekhuruleni Metro Police they were patrolling the open veld for illegal dumping when they heard the cries for help. Upon further investigation they found the illegal miners trapped beneath several layers boulders. The officials then called for rescue services.

Rescue services have since tried to remove the boulders and managed to remove one large boulder. They have also tried to send bottles of water down to the trapped miners.

According to the miners, which can only be verbally communicated with, there are 30 of them trapped in the top section and another 200 odd in another section below them. However this is still difficult to confirm.

Disaster vehicles and law enforcement officials have staged on the scene awaiting the miners. They will be assessed and treated should they have any injuries. The police will also be involved.” – ER24 Emergency Services February 16, 2014 15:25 (SA Time)

Update 1557z:

“Emergency workers have succeeded to gain access to the illegal miners trapped underground in Benoni.

 

Several miners have been brought to surface. As they are being lifted out of the one squared meter hole they are escorted to the medical station where they are checked for any injuries. Once they are cleared they are taken into custody by the local police and EMPD.

 

It still remains unclear if there is any truth in what the miners have told rescuers that several others are trapped in a separate section of the mine. Once the first group have been brought to the surface, rescue workers will make their way down to inspect and search for other miners.

An eight hour joint affront between numerous services made it possible to rescue these miners” – ER24 Emergency Services February 16, 2014 17:53(SA Time)

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(Rescue teams setting up to start securing the site)

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(Heavily armed officers present at the illegal mine in Benoni. Rescue has begun. ER24 on scene and ready)

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(Aerial view of mine rescue in of illegal miners)

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(Crane being moved into position to remove a large boulder)

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(Aerial view of mine rescue)

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(First illegal miner just surfaced)

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(First two miners rescued so far. ER24 on scene ready to treat the injured)

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(Another miner rescued. ER24 assessing the miners before being handed over to SAP)

Other Reports

“Rescuers are communicating with a group of about 30 miners trapped by fallen boulders below the surface at the old mine site in Benoni.

Rescue services in South Africa are trying to reach more than 200 illegal miners reported trapped underground in an abandoned gold shaft in a suburb just east of Johannesburg, an emergency services spokesman said on Sunday.

Werner Vermaak of ER24 emergency services said rescuers were communicating with a group of about 30 miners trapped by fallen boulders below the surface at the old mine site in Benoni.

They told us there are about 200 others trapped further below, Vermaak said.

Its an abandoned mine shaft in the middle of the public veld (open fields) … it was not a blocked-off area, he added. No injuries or casualties had been reported so far, Vermaak said.

Heavy equipment had been brought in to try to remove the boulders obstructing the shaft.

Illegal mining of abandoned shafts is common in South Africa, where informal miners excavate mineral ore to be sold to buyers, often living underground in dangerous and precarious conditions. Fatal accidents are common, and underground battles between rival groups have also been reported.

The illegal diggers also sometimes invade active mines. At least 82 men – thought to have been illegal miners – died after an underground fire at a Harmony gold mine in South Africa in 2009.” – khaleejtimes.com/Reuters

South Africa: NSRI commend crayfish trawler crew for rescue of fisherman in St Francis Bay, Eastern Cape – 100913 1015z

“At 19h30 on Monday the 10th of September St Francis Bay duty crew were activated following a request for urgent medical assistance from the Cape Town crayfish trawler, the 58 meter RIGEL IV, reporting that a 30 year old Cape Town crewman had severe injuries after his foot was caught in a rope, while deploying crayfish traps overboard, allegedly causing the fisherman to be pulled overboard by the rope and then pulled underwater by the descending crayfish trap.

The crayfish trawler was deep-sea, believed to be some 25 nautical miles off-shore of St Francis Bay at the time deploying crayfish traps.

The man overboard emergency procedure was activated by the skipper of RIGEL IV.

From what we understand from crew reports the crew were able to cut one of the lines to the descending crayfish trap and then used the line fouled around the fishermans leg to haul him back up to the sea surface. He was then recovered (rescued) back onto the trawler.

As part of the man overboard emergency procedure NSRI St Francis Bay had immediately been notified by the ships company and a sea rescue response was mobilized.

The man had sustained a serious fracture of his left femur and was suffering near drowning symptoms and lapsing in and out of consciousness.

The vessel immediately headed towards St Francis Bay and our NSRI sea rescue craft Spirit of St Francis Bay was launched to rendezvous with the vessel.

We rendezvoused with the vessel 18 nautical miles off-shore of St Francis Bay, in rough seas of 4.5 meter swells, and two NSRI medics were transferred aboard RIGEL IV where they found the semi conscious patient in a serious condition.

An EC Government Health EMS ambulance was dispatched to stand-by at our sea rescue base.

Crew of the vessel had rendered First-Aid treatment and our NSRI medics continued with medical treatment but sea conditions were too rough to risk transferring the patient across to our sea rescue boat and we instead escorted the trawler towards St Francis Bay while our two NSRI medics stayed onboard the trawler while continuing to render medical treatment.

Once the trawler neared St Francis Bay sea conditions improved and the patient was transferred onto our sea rescue boat and he was brought to our sea rescue base and handed into the care of the EMS paramedics.

The patient has been transported by EMS ambulance to hospital in a serious condition suffering unconsciousness near drowning symptoms and a fractured left femur.

It was reported by the ships Captain that the fisherman had been wearing all safety apparel at the time of the incident, a hard hat, gloves, a life-jacket and protective wear.

The skipper and crew of RIGEL IV are commended for rescuing their crewman from the water in what appear to have been extremely trying circumstances.

The sea rescue operation was completed at 23h30.” – NSRI

Spirit of St Francis II NSRI

Spirit of St Francis II NSRI

12 men dramatically rescued from their fishing trawler that ran aground on ‘Nelson Mandela’s Robben Island’ rocks in storm – 130813 1050z

NSRI: “At 00h04 on Tuesday the13th of August NSRI Table Bay, Melkbosstrand and Bakoven duty crews were activated by the Transnet National Ports Authority following a mayday distress call from the 19.6 meter Hout Bay fishing trawler CLAREMONT with 12 crew onboard reporting to be running aground on the South Western side of Robben Island.

Pat van Eyssen, NSRI Table Bay station commander, said: It appears that the vessel lost motor power and they were drifting ashore in storm seas with 5 to 6 meter breaking swells.

Our Table Bay, Melkbosstrand and Bakoven volunteers launched our sea rescue boats SPIRIT OF VODACOM, ROTARY ENDEAVOR, SPIRIT OF THE VINES and ROTARIAN SCHIPPER and responded to Robben Island.

NSRI Hout Bay and the WC Government Health EMS were placed on high alert.

Telkom Maritime Radio Services provided VHF radio communications for the rescue operation.

NSRI rescue vehicles responded to Signal Hill to assist with communications and a WC Government Health EMS JOC (Joint Operations Command) vehicle was dispatched to assist on Signal Hill.

While responding to the scene the skipper and owner, Marcelino da Silva, 49, from Table View, confirmed that his 11 crew members, all from Hout Bay, had moved to the back of the vessel, only 4 had time to retrieve and don their life-jackets and he reported that he remained in the wheel house while their vessel had waves breaking over the vessel and that they were already in amongst the rocks and the vessel was being battered against rocks and was breaking up.

On arrival on-scene efforts to get the crew off from the sea side, with our NSRI rigid inflatable rescue craft darting in between wave sets under the illumination of white illuminating flares proved fruitless as waves of between 5 to 6 meter sets rolled in forcing our rigid inflatable rescue craft to abandon the efforts each time to avoid being capsized or rammed into rocks.

By this stage it was clear that the crew aboard the casualty vessel were understandably panicking and showing a willingness to take their chances if they abandoned their ship but NSRI controllers, using calm and reassuring voice tones, consoled them over the VHF radios to stay on the relative, although precarious, safety of their ship particularly since only 4 crew members were wearing life-jackets. They were still at that stage a few hundred meters off-shore and their vessel gradually being swept between and over rocks and breaking up as waves crashed over her as she was forced closer to the island.

The Red Cross AMS Skymed 1 helicopter was placed on alert by Metro Control but they could only fly at first light and MRCC (Maritime rescue Coordination Centre) activated the SA Air Force 22 Squadron Oryx helicopters with NSRI station 29 Helicopter rescue unit but they would only become airborne in 2 hours.

The situation intensified when it became clear that the vessel was hard aground on rocks and listing to a 40 degree angle and casualty crew had no further choice and they began to abandon ship under their Captains instruction.

NSRI rescue crews raced into Murray Bay Harbour and summoned the Robben Island Security who mustered their staff, and with an ambulance (that is kept on the island), a mini bus and two bakkies the NSRI crews were driven by the Robben Island security to the side of the island where the casualty crew were abandoning their ship.

The Transnet National Ports Authority activated a Pilot Boat to transport additional NSRI rescue crew, Metro rescue paramedics and rescue and medical equipment, including lighting, to the island from the V&A Waterfront.

WC Government Health EMS ambulances and response paramedics were activated to respond to NSRI Table Bay rescue base to stand-by.

At first only one of the casualty crew managed to get to shore and NSRI rescue swimmers waded, swam and jumped from rock to rock, in between crashing waves to reach the ship where four casualty crew members were found perched on a rock below their listing vessel. They were helped ashore (NSRI rescue swimmers swam them, and helped them over rocks to reach the shore) while wave sets continued to crash over the vessel and over the rescue effort.

In relays all 11 casualty crew were helped ashore by the 8 NSRI rescue swimmers who had gone around to the land side. Only the skipper remained at his wheel house and he reported to require assistance as he was exhausted and he had succumbed to hypothermia. NSRI rescue swimmers were able to retrieve him from the casualty vessel and he too was brought to shore.

By 04h17 all 12 crew members of CLAREMONT were accounted for and ashore on Robben Island. They were transported by Robben Island vehicles to Robben Islands Murray Bay harbour and treatment for hypothermia and shock was commenced.

They were taken aboard SPIRIT OF VODACOM and transported to our sea rescue base at the V&A Waterfront. All 12 men were handed into the care of the Metro ambulance paramedics. They have been transported to Groote Schuur and New Somerset hospitals. All are in stable conditions, for treatment for hypothermia, and two also for treatment for back injuries.

All are men aged between 18 and 52.

The rescue operation was completed at 05h17 today.

SAMSA (South African Maritime Safety Authority) will investigate any possible environmental impact and any chances of a salvage of the vessel which remains hard aground on Robben Island.

(Credit: All pictures, except Robben Island view, from NSRI)

 

The skipper ( left) and crew from the fishing boat Claremont on the Rescue Boat Spirit of Vodacom after their ordeal. 12 Crew were rescued by NSRI volunters off the Hout Bay fishing boat Claremont which went aground on Robben Island on Monday night 12 August 2013. Picture Andrew Ingram / NSRI12 Crew were rescued by NSRI volunters off the Hout Bay fishing boat Claremont which went aground on Robben Island on Monday night 12 August 2013. Pictu

The skipper ( left) and crew from the fishing boat Claremont on the Rescue Boat Spirit of Vodacom after their ordeal. Picture pat Van Eyssen / NSRI.

The NSRI boat Spirit of Vodacom enters Table Bay harbour after the rescue.

The NSRI boat Spirit of Vodacom enters Table Bay harbour after the rescue.

The Sea Rescue boats Rotarian Schipper and Spirit of the Vines enter Table Bay after the rescue.

The Sea Rescue boats Rotarian Schipper and Spirit of the Vines enter Table Bay after the rescue.

Crew from the fishing boat Claremont come ashore after their ordeal.

Crew from the fishing boat Claremont come ashore after their ordeal. Picture Andrew Ingram / NSRI.

 

The skipper of the fishing boat Claremont comes ashore at the Table Bay rescue base.

The skipper of the fishing boat Claremont comes ashore at the Table Bay rescue base. Picture Andrew Ingram / NSRI.

Kobus Meyer, Coxswain of Spirit of the vines shows the damage to his rescue boat during the rescue. 12 Crew were rescued by NSRI volunters off the Hout Bay fishing boat Claremont which went aground on Robben Island on Monday night 12 August 2013. Picture Andrew Ingram / NSRI

Kobus Meyer, Coxswain of Spirit of the Vines, shows the damage to his rescue boat during the rescue. Picture Andrew Ingram / NSRI

NSRI volunteer Kim Germishuys hugs Coxswain Kobus Meyer after the dramatic rescue. 12 Crew were rescued by NSRI volunters off the Hout Bay fishing boat Claremont which went aground on Robben Island on Monday night 12 August 2013. Picture Andrew Ingram / NSRI

NSRI volunteer Kim Germishuys hugs Coxswain Kobus Meyer after the dramatic rescue. Picture Andrew Ingram / NSRI

Robben Island as viewed from Table Moutain / South Africa, Cape Town Feb-2005. (Photo: Stephantom/ wikipedia.org) Click photo for more on Robben Island

South Africa: Crew rescued from grounded bulk carrier off Walker Pt, Buffels Bay – 080813 1320z

Crew evacuated from bulk carrier

 

 

All 19 crew members were safely ashore after being rescued off the ship KIANI SATU. They were airlifted off the ship by a Titan helicopters Sikorski 76 helicopter. Picture NSRI.

All 19 crew members were safely ashore after being rescued off the ship KIANI SATU. They were airlifted off the ship by a Titan helicopters Sikorski 76 helicopter. Picture Bianca Bezuidenhout.

 

UPDATE 3:

 

At 10h02 all 19 crew members were safely ashore after being rescued off the ship KIANI SATU. They were airlifted off the ship by a Titan helicopters Sikorski 76 helicopter in relays.

 

Graeme Harding, NSRI Knysna station commander, said: The rescue helicopter hoisted NSRI helicopter rescue swimmers onto the ships deck where they instructed crew on the procedure to be hoisted into the helicopter by winch hoist using under arm harnesses.

 

Once they were safely airlifted to the beach, because of the terrain, they were then ferried by our NSRI sea rescue vehicles to a parking area in the Goukamma Nature Reserve where the Nature Conservation office was taken over as a rescue operations control point.

 

WC Government Health EMS, ER24 ambulance services, the SA Police Services and Police Sea Borderline are also in attendance.

 

The crew members, Ukranian and Filipino nationals, are handed into the care of Police Sea Borderline and they will be transported to Mossel Bay for visa control processing and accommodated.

 

Only minor injuries were sustained to two crew members of the ship, a laceration to a hand and one with a minor ankle injury, but they do not require to go to hospital and were treated on-scene by paramedics. None of the remaining crew of the casualty vessel were injured and all 19 crew are accounted for and safe.

 

The ship had washed side on to the shore during the early morning and came to rest hard aground after her anchor dragged and the tug boat was not able to hold her off against rough sea swells of 5 meters and strong gusting to 45 knot onshore winds.. The decision was taken by the ships Captain to abandon the ship and the safest method was to deploy the helicopter and hoist the crew off the ship while our NSRI rescue boats stood by to assist if necessary.

 

SAMSA officials remain on-scene and the bulk carrier,fully laden with rice, will be assessed for salvage and efforts to prevent an environmental risks.

 

NSRI Knysna and NSRI Wildreness have now stood down and are returning to base and NSRI Mossel Bay have been taken off high alert as no further rescue assistance is required.

 

NSRI Commend the efforts of NSRI Knysna and NSRI Wilderness crew and the Titan helicopter for the efforts of saving the crew of KIANI SATU today.

 

All 19 crew members were safely ashore after being rescued off the ship KIANI SATU. They were airlifted off the ship by a Titan helicopters Sikorski 76 helicopter. Picture NSRI.

All 19 crew members were safely ashore after being rescued off the ship KIANI SATU. They were airlifted off the ship by a Titan helicopters Sikorski 76 helicopter. Picture Bianca Bezuidenhout/NSRI.

 

 

 

UPDATE 2 :

 

All 19 crew members of the 165 meter rice bulk carrier container ship KIANI SATU are being evacuated off the casualty ship in relays by NSRI Knysna and NSRI Wilderness sea rescue boats.

 

Once safely ashore the crew will be processed and handed into the care of Police and Tourism officials. No injuries have been sustained.

 

The first 9 crew members were brought safely ashore at 09h34.

 

Environmental risks are being assessed by SAMSA (South African Maritime Safety Authority) and efforts will be made to salvage the ship.

 

All 19 crew members were safely ashore after being rescued off the ship KIANI SATU. They were airlifted off the ship by a Titan helicopters Sikorski 76 helicopter. Picture Bianca Bezuidenhout, Wilderness NSRI crew.

All 19 crew members were safely ashore after being rescued off the ship KIANI SATU. They were airlifted off the ship by a Titan helicopters Sikorski 76 helicopter. Picture Bianca Bezuidenhout, Wilderness NSRI crew.

 

ORIGINAL REPORT:

 

WALKER POINT, BUFFELS BAY Thursday, 08th August, 2013. Ship at risk:

 

At 03h39 on Thursday the 8th of August NSRI Knysna volunteer sea rescue duty crew were activated by the Transnet National Ports Authority following reports of theKIANI SATU, a 165 meter rice bulk carrier container ship, at risk of running aground at Walker Bay, between Knysna and Sedgefield with 19 crew members aboard who are believed to be Filipino and Ukranian nationals.

 

Our Knysna volunteers responded towing our sea rescue craft JAYTEE III and SPIRIT OF KYC and NSRI Wilderness volunteer sea rescue duty crew were also activated and they have towed their sea rescue craft SPIRIT OF ROTARY 100 and SERENDIPITY and our NSRI rescue crews are standing-by at Walker Point ready to launch to rescue the 19 crew if that becomes necessary. The Red Cross AMS Skymed 2 helicopter at George Airport is also on high alert accompanied by NSRI helicopter rescue swimmers to respond if it becomes necessary.

 

According to SAMSA (South African Maritime Safety Authority) the salvage vessel SMIT AMANDLA was dispatched from Cape Town in the early hours of this morning and is expected to reach the scene at nightfall today.

 

NSRI are poised on the shore ready to spring into action if it becomes necessary.

 

The ship, sailing from Cape Town, to Gabon, appears to have run into motor mechanical problems yesterday. A tug boat, the Fairmont Glazier, were dispatched to assist and is onscene. In 5 meter swells and gusting to 45 knot onshore Westerly winds the casualty vessel KIANI SATU has dragged anchor and they are now lying about half a nautical mile off-shore and her anchor is currently holding.

 

Fog has descended further hampering the stand-by rescue operation. There are no direct access points for media on the scene and media are respectfully requested to hold back and not approach as the coastline in the area is dangerous and the ship cannot be viewed from shore.

 

The Captain is not willing to have his crew leave the ship at this stage and NSRI on-scene Commander Graeme Harding, NSRI Knysna station commander, is in agreement that unless the situation turns worse it is unnecessary to evacuate crew in the dark under these sea conditions.

 

Media are respectfully requested to NOT call NSRI by phone on the scene and to liaise only via NSRI Communications at 0823803800.

 

This is a tense situation and our NSRI rescue resources on the scene cannot have communications tied up.

 

NSRI DOES NOT HAVE PHOTOGRAPHS AT THIS STAGE.

 

At this stage all crew onboard the trawler are safe and decisions on further action are being assessed.

 

Further updates will follow periodically as the morning progresses.

 

All 19 crew members were safely ashore after being rescued off the ship KIANI SATU. They were airlifted off the ship by a Titan helicopters Sikorski 76 helicopter. Picture Bianca Bezuidenhout, Wilderness NSRI crew.

All 19 crew members were safely ashore after being rescued off the ship KIANI SATU. They were airlifted off the ship by a Titan helicopters Sikorski 76 helicopter. Picture Bianca Bezuidenhout, Wilderness NSRI crew.