UK: Tynemouth lifeboat rescues world’s only engineless cargo ship, the Tres Hombres – Published 04 Jun 2017 2133z (GMT/UTC)

The world’s only Engineless Sailing Cargo Ship was towed to safety by Tynemouth RNLI lifeboat on Sunday morning (June 4th).

Tynemouth RNLI all weather lifeboat tows the Tres Hombres – the World’s only Engineless Sailing Cargo Ship – to safety at North Shields. (Image: RNLI/Adrian Don)

The lifeboat and volunteer crew members launched in response to a request for help by the skipper of the Brigantine-type sailing ship Tres Hombres.
Earlier in the morning a motor launch belonging to the 32m,128tonne sailing vessel had broken down and had been towed back to her mother ship by Cullercoats RNLI lifeboat.
The skipper of the Tres Hombres then asked for assistance in getting his vessel to a safe harbour because as she is powered only by sail and has no auxiliary engine, she relies on the now broken-down motor launch to maneuver in port. With very strong winds expected on Monday, the vessel could have been in a precarious situation so, after discussions with UK Coastguard, it was decided that the safest option for it was to tow her into the river Tyne.
Tynemouth RNLI’s all weather lifeboat was requested to launch at 10:44 and made best speed to the Tres Hombres which was anchored off Whitley Bay with Cullercoats RNLI lifeboat standing by her.
Once the lifeboat met the sailing ship the volunteer crew quickly got her under tow, while a crew member went on board to ensure the tow ropes remained secure.
The Tres Hombres and her crew of 15 were then taken to North Shields Western Quay without further incident, escorted by Cullercoats RNLI lifeboat who put two crew members ashore on the quay to assist with mooring.
Once the sailing vessel was made fast on the quay the lifeboats returned to their respective stations.
Adrian Don, the spokesman for Tynemouth RNLI lifeboat, said: ‘This is one of the most unusual services our volunteer crew members have carried out and the casualty vessel is unique as the world’s only engineless sailing cargo ship.
‘The Tres Hombres and her crew were in no immediate danger but having no engine and with her launch broken down, they had no means of safely getting into harbour and with very poor weather expected her skipper had no alternative but to ask for assistance.
‘Our volunteers were happy to help and quickly got the vessel into the shelter of the Tyne harbour’. – RNLI

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UK: Cargo ship Danio runs aground on Northumberland coast, concern for environment if oil leaks – 170313 1725z

(Photo: RNLI/Seahouses Lifeboat Station) Danio cargo vessel runs aground on Farne Islands. Seahouses Lifeboat attends.

“An 80 metre long ship has run aground on rocks near to the Farne Islands.

The MV Danio was carrying timbre from Perth in Scotland to Antwerp in Belgium when it hit when it struck the Blue Caps rocks at about 4.30 am Saturday morning.

The Seahouses RNLI lifeboat was immediately launched but attempts to tow the Danio to deeper waters had to be abandoned due to the outgoing tide.

The islands lie just three miles off the Northumberland coast.

They are part of an important wildlife haven for sea birds.

The Maritime and Coastguard Agency said there was no fuel leak from the MV Danio.

“No-one injured and pollution observed at this time” – Coastguard Credit: PA/RNLI

A spokesman said the master of the vessel reported the incident to the Coastguard and a salvage plan was being prepared.

“There was no-one injured and no pollution observed at this time,” the spokesman said.

“The Maritime and Coastguard Agency have been in touch with all relevant parties to ensure that the owners of the vessel have a salvage plan in place for the refloating of the vessel at the next high tide, which is this evening.”

Salvage operation underway Credit: PA/RNLI

Andrew Douglas, who runs boat trips round the Farnes from Seahouses, said the Danio was carrying logs.

He said: “She seems to be fine at the moment, and doesn’t appear to be holed.

“But it is worrying because all the birds are starting to return to the islands for the summer.

“We have 20,000 guillemots on the Farnes right now.”

National Trust’s head ranger for the Farne Islands: “We got lucky.” Credit: PA/RNLI

The Farne Islands are also home to puffins, grey seals and more than 20 bird species breed there.

David Steel, the National Trust’s head ranger for the Farnes, said: “We got lucky.

“The birds are not back and there does not seem to be any damage to the ship, so we got away with it.

“The Farnes are internationally-important for nesting sea birds. We have 80,000 pairs of sea birds including 37,000 pairs of puffins.” – ITV News

Update 17 Mar 2013 Aprrox 1600z

Seahouses RNLI lifeboat: “No changes yet lifeboat returned to Seahouses harbour lunchtime to possibly return to stricken vessel at next high tide.” “…she’s pretty stuck and with the smaller tides this weekend it’s not looking good but fingers crossed”

(Photos: RNLI)

Other Reports

Danio cargo vessel runs aground on Farne Islands

BBC NEWS 16 March 2013 Last updated at 22:58

A 262ft (80m) cargo vessel has run aground off the Northumberland coast.

The Seahouses Lifeboat Station received a distress call from the cargo vessel Danio in the early hours of Saturday.

The ship got caught on rocks on the Farne Islands, a sanctuary to seals and seabirds, about 3 miles (5km) from the mainland.

Salvage teams are at the scene but there are no reports of any fuel leak or injuries. The crew of six are spending the night on board.

The vessel, which was built in 2001 and registered in Antigua and Barbuda, was sailing from Perth to Antwerp in Belgium with a cargo of timber.

It ran aground near Little Harcar rock, close to the Longstone Lighthouse, at about 04:30 GMT.

Ian Clayton from the RNLI said there were concerns about possible environmental damage if oil started leaking from the vessel.

But National Trust ranger David Steel said he was “hopeful” the vessel would pass without “any incidents”.

‘Overnight watch’

He said: “Everything seems good. It’s only if there is a spillage we’ll become concerned.

“We have been very fortunate that this has happened out of the height of the season. If it had happened in mid-summer, it could have been disastrous.”

There have been no reported spillages from the vessel so far

It was hoped the ship would be moved by a tugboat during high tide but this has not been possible.

Mr Clayton said Seahouses lifeboats had been with the vessel for 15 hours and a crew from Berwick-upon-Tweed would be on watch overnight.

A meeting will take place on Sunday morning involving various officials – including the coastguard, pollution control experts and salvage teams – to work out the best way to move the vessel.

Earlier, Mr Clayton said: “It is not a good area for any shipping to be in.

“It is lying in quite a tricky location and it will be difficult for the tugs to get in there to try and get the vessel freed.

“Obviously we have concerns for any possible environmental damage should any oil start to leak from this vessel, because of the very sensitive nature of the Farne Islands.”

The island is home to about 80,000 pairs of seabirds and a large grey seal colony.” – BBC News