Norfolk Island/ NZ /New Caledonia: Tropical Cyclone COOK 16P 111500Z position nr 27.0S 168.8E, moving SE 13 kt (JTWC) – Updated 11 Apr 2017 1453z (GMT/UTC)

Tropical Cyclone COOK (16P)

MAXIMUM SIGNIFICANT WAVE HEIGHT AT 111200Z IS 15 FEET (JTWC)

(Image: Apr 11, 2017, 12:00:00 AM GMT @wunderground)

Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC)

Tropical Cyclone 16P (Cook) Warning #08 Final Warning
Issued at 11/1500Z

WTPS31 PGTW 111500
MSGID/GENADMIN/JOINT TYPHOON WRNCEN PEARL HARBOR HI//
SUBJ/TROPICAL CYCLONE 16P (COOK) WARNING NR 008//
RMKS/
1. TROPICAL CYCLONE 16P (COOK) WARNING NR 008
01 ACTIVE TROPICAL CYCLONE IN SOUTHPAC
MAX SUSTAINED WINDS BASED ON ONE-MINUTE AVERAGE
WIND RADII VALID OVER OPEN WATER ONLY

WARNING POSITION:
111200Z — NEAR 26.6S 168.2E
MOVEMENT PAST SIX HOURS – 125 DEGREES AT 13 KTS
POSITION ACCURATE TO WITHIN 030 NM
POSITION BASED ON CENTER LOCATED BY SATELLITE
PRESENT WIND DISTRIBUTION:
MAX SUSTAINED WINDS – 045 KT, GUSTS 055 KT
WIND RADII VALID OVER OPEN WATER ONLY
BECOMING EXTRATROPICAL
RADIUS OF 034 KT WINDS – 135 NM NORTHEAST QUADRANT
135 NM SOUTHEAST QUADRANT
115 NM SOUTHWEST QUADRANT
070 NM NORTHWEST QUADRANT
REPEAT POSIT: 26.6S 168.2E

FORECASTS:
12 HRS, VALID AT:
120000Z — 28.3S 170.7E
MAX SUSTAINED WINDS – 035 KT, GUSTS 045 KT
WIND RADII VALID OVER OPEN WATER ONLY
EXTRATROPICAL
RADIUS OF 034 KT WINDS – 135 NM NORTHEAST QUADRANT
140 NM SOUTHEAST QUADRANT
120 NM SOUTHWEST QUADRANT
080 NM NORTHWEST QUADRANT

REMARKS:
111500Z POSITION NEAR 27.0S 168.8E.
TROPICAL CYCLONE 16P (COOK), LOCATED APPROXIMATELY 490 NM SOUTH
OF NOUMEA, NEW CALEDONIA, HAS TRACKED SOUTHEASTWARD AT 13 KNOTS OVER
THE PAST SIX HOURS. ANIMATED ENHANCED INFRARED SATELLITE IMAGERY
DEPICTS A RAPIDLY DECAYING SYSTEM WITH SIGNIFICANT VERTICAL WIND
SHEAR AS IT INTERACTS WITH THE MIDLATITUDE WESTERLIES. THE INITIAL
POSITION IS BASED ON A 111141Z 89 GHZ AMSU IMAGE SHOWING AN
INCREASINGLY ASYMMETRIC LOW LEVEL CIRCULATION CENTER. THE INITIAL
INTENSITY OF 45 KNOTS IS BASED ON CURRENT INTENSITY SUBJECTIVE
DVORAK ESTIMATES OF T3.0 (45 KNOTS). TC COOK IS CURRENTLY TRACKING
SOUTHEASTWARD INTO THE MIDLATITUDE BAROCLINIC REGION, AND IS
EXPECTED TO TRANSITION INTO A FULLY EXTRATROPICAL SYSTEM WITHIN THE
NEXT 12 HOURS. THIS IS THE FINAL WARNING ON THIS SYSTEM BY THE JOINT
TYPHOON WRNCEN PEARL HARBOR HI. THE SYSTEM WILL BE CLOSELY MONITORED
FOR SIGNS OF REGENERATION. MAXIMUM SIGNIFICANT WAVE HEIGHT AT 111200Z
IS 15 FEET.//
NNNN

===========================================================================

TROPICAL DISTURBANCE ADVISORY NUMBER A15 ISSUED FROM RSMC NADI
Apr 110152 UTC.

TROPICAL CYCLONE COOK CENTRE [980HPA] CATEGORY 2 WAS LOCATED NEAR
24.6S 166.0E AT 110000 UTC. POSITION FAIR BASED ON HR HIMAWARI-8 VIS
IMAGERY. CYCLONE MOVING SOUTH AT ABOUT 10 KNOTS. MAXIMUM 10-MINUTE
AVERAGE WINDS NEAR THE CENTRE ESTIMATED AT ABOUT 55 KNOTS.
EXPECT WINDS OVER 47 KNOTS WITHIN 40 NAUTICAL MILES IN SECTOR FROM
NORTH THROUGH EAST TO WEST.
AND WITHIN 25 NAUTICAL MILES IN NW QUADRANT.
EXPECT WINDS ABOVE 33 KNOTS WITHIN 120 NAUTICAL MILES IN NE QUADRANT
AND WITHIN 120 NAUTICAL MILES IN SE QUADRANT
AND WITHIN 100 NAUTICAL MILES IN SW QUADRANT
AND WITHIN 60 NAUTICAL MILES IN NW QUADRANT.

LLCC PARTIALLY EXPOSED. DEEP CONVECTION HAS DECREASED SIGNIFICANTLY
IN PAST 12 HOURS. ORGANISATION HAS ALSO DECREASED. CYCLONE LIES IN A
MODERATE TO HIGH SHEARED ENVIRONMENT. OUTFLOW GOOD TO THE SOUTH WITH
MODERATE UPPER DIVERGENCE. SST AROUND 26-27 DEGREES CELCIUS. COOK IS
BEING STEERED TO THE SOUTHEAST BY THE DEEP LAYER MEAN NORTHWESTERLY
FLOW. DVORAK ANALYSIS BASED ON SHEAR PATTERN WITH LLCC ABOUT 1/3
DEGRESS INTO STRONG TEMPERATURE GRADIENT YIELDS, DT=3.5 MET 3.5 AND
PT=3.5. FT BASED ON DT. THUS, YIELDING T3.5/4.0/W1.5/24HRS. CI HELD
HIGH DUE TO CI RULES FOR WEAKENING.

GLOBAL MODELS AGREE ON A SOUTHEAST TRACK WITH FURTHER WEAKENING.

FORECASTS :
AT 12 HRS VALID AT 111200 UTC 26.1S 167.9E MOV SE AT 12 KT WITH 50 KT
CLOSE TO CENTRE
AT 24 HRS VALID AT 120000 UTC 27.4S 170.1E MOV SE AT 12 KT WITH 45 KT
CLOSE TO CENTRE

OUTLOOK :
AT 36 HRS VALID AT 121200 UTC 28.9S 172.5E MOV SE AT 12 KT WITH 35 KT
CLOSE TO CENTRE

THIS WILL BE THE LAST TROPICAL DISTURBANCE ADVISORY ON COOK.

 

TROPICAL CYCLONE POTENTIAL BULLETIN ISSUED BY METEOROLOGICAL SERVICE OF NEW ZEALAND AT 0346 UTC 11-Apr-2017

CURRENT STATUS OF CYCLONE ACTIVITY

Tropical Cyclone Cook (980hPa, Category 2) was located near 24.6S
166E at 11/0000UTC today or about 140nm south of Noumea, New
Caledonia, moving south at 10 knots. Maximum winds near the centre
were estimated to be 55 knots with gales extending up to 120nm from
the centre.

FORECAST TO 1200 UTC 12-Apr-2017

Tropical Cyclone Cook (980hPa, Category 2) was located near 24.6S
166E, or about bout 140nm south of Noumea, New Caledonia, at
11/0000UTC today and is currently moving south out of the Tropics.

Tropical depression, TD19F, (994hPa) was analysed near 26.0S 169.3W,
or about 430nm southeast of Nukualofa, Tonga at 11/0000UTC today. The
system has low potential to develop into a TC, and is expected to
drift slowly northwards towards Niue over the next 24 hours.

OUTLOOK TO 1200 UTC 15-Apr-2017

TD19F is expected to track east-southeast from Thursday and lie near
southern Cook Islands, then weaken from Friday onwards.

The next bulletin will be issued by 0500 UTC Wed 12-Apr-2017

(C) Copyright Meteorological Service of New Zealand Ltd 2017

 

Tropical Storm Risk (TSR)

SW Pacific: TSR Storm Alert issued at 9 Apr, 2017 12:00 GMT

SW Pacific: Storm Alert issued at 11 Apr, 2017 12:00 GMT (Final Warning)

Tropical Storm COOK is currently located near 26.6 S 168.2 E with maximum 1-min sustained winds of 45kts (52 mph). COOK is forecast to affect land to the following likelihood(s) at the given lead time(s):
Yellow Alert Country(s) or Province(s)
    Norfolk Island
        probability for TS is 70% within 12 hours
Yellow Alert City(s) and Town(s)
    Kingston (29.1 S, 168.0 E)
        probability for TS is 65% within 12 hours

Note that
Yellow Alert (Elevated) is CAT 1 or above to between 10% and 30% probability, or TS to above 50% probability.
CAT 1 means Tropical Cyclone strength winds of at least 74 mph, 119 km/h or 64 knots 1-min sustained.
TS means Tropical Storm strength winds of at least 39 mph, 63 km/h or 34 knots 1-min sustained.

 

MARITIME/SHIPPING

METAREA14 / TROPICAL_CYCLONE_WARNING_SOUTH_25S / 1311

WTNZ41 NZKL 111311
GALE WARNING 279
THIS AFFECTS OCEAN AREA: SUBTROPIC
TROPICAL CYCLONE COOK 990HPA] CENTRE WAS LOCATED NEAR 26.6 SOUTH
168.8 EAST AT 111200 UTC.
POSITION FAIR.
REPEAT POSITION 26.6S 168.8E AT 111200 UTC.
CYCLONE IS MOVING EASTSOUTHEAST 15 KNOTS.
EXPECT SUSTAINED WINDS OF 40 KNOTS CLOSE TO THE CENTRE WITH VERY
ROUGH SEA AND MODERATE TO HEAVY SWELL.
EXPECT WINDS OVER 33 KNOTS WITHIN 120 NAUTICAL MILES OF CENTRE IN
THE SECTOR FROM NORTH THROUGH EAST TO WEST AND WITHIN 80 NAUTICAL
MILES OF CENTRE IN THE NORTHWEST QUADRANT.
THIS WARNING CANCELS AND REPLACES WARNING 268.=

South West Pacific Marine

UPDATED

MARINE WEATHER BULLETIN FOR ISLANDS AREA EQUATOR TO 25S BETWEEN 160E AND 120W. ISSUED BY FIJI METEOROLOGICAL SERVICE EQUATOR to 25S between 160E and 120W issued by Fiji Meteorological Service Apr 110800 UTC. PART 1 : WARNINGSTORM WARNING 034 ISSUED FROM RSMC NADI Apr 110731 UTC. REFER TO STORM WARNING NUMBER 268 ISSUED BY RSMC WELLINGTON. THIS WARNING CANCELS AND REPLACES WARNING 032. ********************************************************************* ************** GALE WARNING 035 ISSUED FROM RSMC NADI Apr 110847 UTC. IN THE AREA BOUNDED BY 23S 174W 23S 165W 25S 175W 25S 166W,EXPECT CLOCKWISE WINDS UP TO 35 KNOTS OVER WATERS ONLY. AREA OF GALES SLOW MOVING. THIS WARNING CANCELS AND REPLACES WARNING 033. ********************************************************************* ************** PARTS 2 AND 3 : SYNOPSIS AND FORECAST VALID UNTIL Apr 120600 UTC. CONVERGENCE ZONE CZ1 11S 160E 16S 165E 23S 169E SLOW MOVING. POOR VISIBILITY IN OCCASIONAL SHOWERS, HEAVY AT TIMES AND FEW THUNDERSTORMS WITHIN 210 NAUTICAL MILES OF CZ1. WITHIN 180 NAUTICAL MILES OF CZ1, EXPECT NORTHWEST TO NORTHEAST WINDS 20 TO 25 KNOTS GUSTING TO 30 KNOTS. ROUGH TO VERY ROUGH SEAS. MODERATE NORTHERLY SWELLS. CONVERGENCE ZONE CZ2 10S 160W 08S 145W 07S 130W 07S 120W SLOW MOVING. POOR VISIBILITY IN OCCASIONAL SHOWERS, HEAVY AT TIMES AND FEW THUNDERSTORMS WITHIN 240 NAUTICAL MILES OF CZ2. TROUGH T1 04S 160E 08S 175E 11S 179W SLOW MOVING. POOR VISIBILITY IN OCCASIONAL SHOWERS AND FEW THUNDERSTORMS WITHIN 150 NAUTICAL MILES OF T1. TROUGH T2 12S 176W 18S 170W 20S 168W 25S 167W SLOW MOVING. POOR VISIBILITY IN OCCASIONAL SHOWERS AND FEW THUNDERSTORMS WITHIN 180 NAUTICAL MILES OF T2. TROUGH T3 09S 169W 13S 163W 16S 160W SLOW MOVING. POOR VISIBILITY IN OCCASIONAL SHOWERS AND FEW THUNDERSTORMS WITHIN 150 NAUTICAL MILES OF T3. TROUGH T4 17S 152W 21S 145W 25S 138W SLOW MOVING. POOR VISIBILITY IN OCCASIONAL SHOWERS, HEAVY AT TIMES AND FEW SQUALLY THUNDERSTORMS WITHIN 180 NAUTICAL MILES OF T4. TROUGH T5 25S 156W 22S 149W SLOW MOVING. POOR VISIBILITY IN OCCASIONAL SHOWERS, HEAVY AT TIMES AND FEW SQUALLY THUNDERSTORMS WITHIN 150 NAUTICAL MILES OF T5. OUTSIDE STORM WARNING NUMBER 034 AND IN THE AREA SOUTH OF 22S AND BETWEEN 165E AND 175E, EXPECT CLOCKWISE WINDS 20 TO 30 KNOTS. ROUGH TO VERY ROUGH SEAS. IN THE AREA SOUTH OF 15S AND BETWEEN 175E AND 135W, EXPECT MODERATE TO HEAVY SOUTHERLY SWELLS. IN THE AREA SOUTH OF EQ AND EAST OF 135W, EXPECT MODERATE SOUTHERLY SWELLS.

Do not use any information on this site for life or death decisions. All information is intended as supplementary to official sources. Kindly refer to your country’s official weather agency/government website for local warnings, advisories and bulletins.

New Zealand: Tropical Cyclone PAM 17P CAT3 151500Z POSITION nr 34.2S 178.8E, moving SE at 20 Kts (JTWC) – Updated 150315 1448z (GMT/UTC)

Tropical Cyclone 17P (PAM)

(Equivalent of a CATEGORY 3 Hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale)

MAXIMUM SIGNIFICANT WAVE HEIGHT AT 151200Z IS 40 FEET – JTWC

(Image: wunderground.com) 5 day forecast

(Image: wunderground.com) 5 day forecast

sp201517_sat_anim Pam 15

(Image: wunderground.com) Satellite

New Zealand

Issued at 12:54am Monday 16 Mar 2015 (Local time)

UPDATE TROPICAL CYCLONE PAM

At midnight Sunday tropical cyclone Pam was situated about 450km to the northeast of Auckland and 450km to the north of East Cape. It has already brought 70mm or rain to parts of Gisborne and 140 to 150 kilometer an hour wind gusts to exposed parts of Auckland and Northland.

It is expected to lie about 150km east of East Cape (northern Gisborne)by midday Monday,then move away from the New Zealand coastline towards the Chatham Islands.Strong southeast winds and rain are expected over much of the North Island today, along with extremely large seas about the east coast.Wind gusts of 160 km/h or more are possible about the eastern Bay of Plenty and northern parts of Gisborne.Winds of this strength are likely to cause damage to trees and powerlines and could lift roofs and make for hazardous driving conditions.A burst of heavy rain accompanies these winds, with 180-220 mm possible about the Gisborne ranges.Please refer to the latest severe weather warnings and watches issued by MetService for more information. The total combined waves (sea and swell)generated by cyclone Pam are expected to rise to 7-8m around the northern New Zealand coastline and even up to 9m around the northern Gisborne coast.
For any further information go to: http://www.metservice.com/national/home
The next update to this blog will be around midnight Sunday 15 March.
For further information please contact:
Duty Meteorologist 044700815
+++++++++++++

Cyclone Pam – Latest update 1am Monday 16th March

HORDUR THORDARSON, METSERVICE METEOROLOGIST

Sunday 16 March 2015 1:00am

Category 3 Cyclone Pam was lying near 34S 178.5E at midnight, or about 450 kilometres northeast of Auckland and 450 kilometres north of East Cape on a track to the south-southeast as shown on the image below.

Track

The effects of Cyclone Pam are already being felt in some areas. A wind gust to 150 kilometres per hour was observed near Kaeo in Northland and a gust of 144 kilometres an hour was observed at Channel Island between Coromandel Peninsula and Great Barrier Island this evening. Rain is becoming heavy in Gisborne and and 70mm have already accumulated in some areas there.

Rain radar at 11pm Sunday
Rain radar at 11pm Sunday

Pam is expected to be reclassified early this morning and will from then on be considered an extra tropical cyclone.

Infra red image at 11pm Sunday
Infra red image at 11pm Sunday

Why will it be re classified? The reason for this is that the nature of the system changes. A tropical cyclone derives its energy from latent heat released in strong deep convection. Warm moist air over a warm sea surface rises, condenses, warms further and continues to rise. This is the energy that intensifies and maintains a tropical cyclone. Once the cyclone moves south out of the tropics and over cooler waters this energy source decreases. Normally this will lead to a slow weakening of the system.

There is however a new energy source that becomes available to the storm as it moves out of the tropics. This energy comes from the difference between hot and cold air. If there is a large temperature difference over a relatively short distance this can be a powerful source of energy that re-energises the storm as it moves out of the tropics.

The main differences between a tropical cyclone and an extra tropical cyclone are:

Tropical Cyclone                                                Extra tropical cyclone

No fronts                                                             Fronts

Winds max close the centre                           Wind maximum well away front the centre

Driven by latent heat release                         Strong temperature gradients

Reclassification does not mean that “Pam” no longer poses any threat. Extremely strong wind gusts, heavy rain and phenomenal waves are still expected, and details can be found in http://www.metservice.com/warnings/home as well as in http://blog.metservice.com/ or http://www.metservice.com/national/home

Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC)

sh1715 pam 15

https://i1.wp.com/www.usno.navy.mil/NOOC/nmfc-ph/RSS/jtwc/satshots/17P_151132sair.jpg

WTPS31 PGTW 151500

MSGID/GENADMIN/JOINT TYPHOON WRNCEN PEARL HARBOR HI//
SUBJ/TROPICAL CYCLONE 17P (PAM) WARNING NR 022//
RMKS/
1. TROPICAL CYCLONE 17P (PAM) WARNING NR 022
02 ACTIVE TROPICAL CYCLONES IN SOUTHPAC
MAX SUSTAINED WINDS BASED ON ONE-MINUTE AVERAGE
WIND RADII VALID OVER OPEN WATER ONLY

WARNING POSITION:
151200Z — NEAR 33.3S 178.3E
MOVEMENT PAST SIX HOURS – 140 DEGREES AT 20 KTS
POSITION ACCURATE TO WITHIN 060 NM
POSITION BASED ON CENTER LOCATED BY SATELLITE
PRESENT WIND DISTRIBUTION:
MAX SUSTAINED WINDS – 065 KT, GUSTS 080 KT
WIND RADII VALID OVER OPEN WATER ONLY
BECOMING EXTRATROPICAL
RADIUS OF 050 KT WINDS – 085 NM NORTHEAST QUADRANT
085 NM SOUTHEAST QUADRANT
065 NM SOUTHWEST QUADRANT
065 NM NORTHWEST QUADRANT
RADIUS OF 034 KT WINDS – 160 NM NORTHEAST QUADRANT
160 NM SOUTHEAST QUADRANT
140 NM SOUTHWEST QUADRANT
140 NM NORTHWEST QUADRANT
REPEAT POSIT: 33.3S 178.3E

FORECASTS:
12 HRS, VALID AT:
160000Z — 37.0S 179.9W
MAX SUSTAINED WINDS – 050 KT, GUSTS 065 KT
WIND RADII VALID OVER OPEN WATER ONLY
EXTRATROPICAL

REMARKS:
151500Z POSITION NEAR 34.2S 178.8E.
TROPICAL CYCLONE 17P (PAM), LOCATED APPROXIMATELY 572 NM EAST-
SOUTHEAST OF KINGSTON IS., HAS TRACKED SOUTHEASTWARD AT 20 KNOTS
OVER THE PAST SIX HOURS. ANIMATED ENHANCED IR SATELLITE IMAGERY
DEPICTS RAPIDLY DECAYING DEEP CONVECTION WITH A PARTIALLY EXPOSED
LOW-LEVEL CIRCULATION CENTER AND LIMITED CORE CONVECTION, WITH THE
MAJORITY OF THE CONVECTION ON THE EASTERN SIDE. THIS IS CONFIRMED
WITH A 151246Z GPM IMAGE WHICH SHOWS THE SYSTEM TAKING ON FRONTAL
CHARACTERISTICS. THE SYSTEM IS EXPECTED TO COMPLETE EXTRA-TROPICAL
TRANSITION BY TAU 12 AS IT BECOMES FULLY ENVELOPED IN THE BAROCLINIC
ZONE. THERE IS HIGH CONFIDENCE IN THE JTWC FORECAST BASED ON THE
TIGHT AGREEMENT OF DYNAMIC MODELS. THIS IS THE FINAL WARNING ON THIS
SYSTEM BY THE JOINT TYPHOON WRNCEN PEARL HARBOR HI. THE SYSTEM WILL
BE CLOSELY MONITORED FOR SIGNS OF REGENERATION. MAXIMUM SIGNIFICANT
WAVE HEIGHT AT 151200Z IS 40 FEET. REFER TO TROPICAL CYCLONE 18P
(NATHAN) WARNINGS (WTPS32 PGTW) FOR TWELVE-HOURLY UPDATES.//
NNNN

TSR logoSW Pacific: Storm Alert issued at 15 Mar, 2015 12:00 GMT (Final Warning)

Tropical Cyclone PAM (17P) currently located near 33.3 S 178.3 E is forecast to strike land to the following likelihood(s) at the given lead time(s):

Yellow Alert Country(s) or Province(s)
    New Zealand
        probability for TS is 85% within 12 hours

Note that
Yellow Alert (Elevated) is CAT 1 or above to between 10% and 30% probability, or TS to above 50% probability.
CAT 1 means Tropical Cyclone strength winds of at least 74 mph, 119 km/h or 64 knots 1-min sustained.
TS means Tropical Storm strength winds of at least 39 mph, 63 km/h or 34 knots 1-min sustained.

For graphical forecast information and further details please visit http://www.tropicalstormrisk.com/

201517P pam 15

MARITIME/ SHIPPING

HURRICANE WARNING

ZCZC 387
WHNZ41 NZKL 150626
HURRICANE WARNING 246
THIS AFFECTS OCEAN AREAS: SUBTROPIC AND FORTIES
TROPICAL CYCLONE PAM 950HPA] CENTRE WAS LOCATED NEAR 32.0 SOUTH 177.
4 EAST AT 150600 UTC.
POSITION POOR.
REPEAT POSITION 32.0S 177.4E AT 150600 UTC.
CYCLONE IS MOVING SOUTHEAST 30 KNOTS.
EXPECT SUSTAINED WINDS OF 80 KNOTS CLOSE TO THE CENTRE EASING TO 70
KNOTS BY 151800 UTC AND THEN EASING TO 50 KNOTS BY 160600 UTC.
PHENOMENAL SEA EASING TO HIGH TO VERY HIGH SEA AND MODERATE TO HEAVY
SWELL.
EXPECT WINDS OVER 63 KNOTS WITHIN 120 NAUTICAL MILES OF CENTRE IN
THE EASTERN SEMICIRCLE AND WITHIN 60 NAUTICAL MILES OF CENTRE IN THE
WESTERN SEMICIRCLE.
EXPECT WINDS OVER 47 KNOTS WITHIN 180 NAUTICAL MILES OF CENTRE IN
THE EASTERN SEMICIRCLE AND WITHIN 60 NAUTICAL MILES OF CENTRE IN THE
WESTERN SEMICIRCLE.
EXPECT WINDS OVER 33 KNOTS WITHIN 320 NAUTICAL MILES OF CENTRE IN
THE EASTERN SEMICIRCLE AND WITHIN 280 NAUTICAL MILES OF CENTRE IN
THE WESTERN SEMICIRCLE WITH VERY ROUGH SEA AND MODERATE TO HEAVY
SWELL.
FORECAST POSITION NEAR 35.6S 179.9E AT 151800 UTC
AND NEAR 38.4S 177.6W AT 160600 UTC.
THIS WARNING CANCELS AND REPLACES WARNING 243.

NNNN

.Further warnings here:

METAREA X

METAREA XIV

PassageWeather is a FREE sailing weather website: http://www.passageweather.com/

Do not use any information on this site for life or death decisions. All information is intended as supplementary to official sources. Kindly refer to your country’s official weather agency/government website for local warnings, advisories and bulletins.

New Zealand: LOW 991hPa Ex-Tropical #Cyclone 18F Lusi 151200Z nr 37S 171E, moving S at 15 kts. Expected to cross South Island overnight Sunday (RSMC Wellington) – Updated 150314 1442z

Ex-Tropical Cyclone Lusi

Expected to cross the South Island overnight Sunday (RSMC Wellington)

New Zealand be aware!

Tropical Cyclone Lusi

SEVERE WEATHER WARNING.

ISSUED BY MetService AT 8:27 pm 15-Mar-2014

Ex-cyclone Lusi continues to bring heavy rain and easterly gales to many places this weekend, but conditions are improving over the upper North Island tonight.

A depression – formerly Tropical Cyclone Lusi – lies west of Northland this evening and is expected to be centred about 300km west of Auckland at midnight tonight. The low will then move southwards to cross the upper South Island Sunday evening. Widespread rain and easterly gales are spreading southwards, but have eased in Northland this evening. The heaviest falls this afternoon and evening have been in Coromandel Peninsula and Gisborne, but although still heavy, the rain there is slowly easing. The heaviest falls tonight and during Sunday are forecast for the upper South Island, where the ranges of Nelson could see up to 200mm of rain.

Warnings for heavy rain or severe gales are still in place from Auckland to north Otago. Please note, that a warning for heavy northwesterly rain is now in place for Buller.

As the low crosses the upper South Island Sunday night, northwest gales are forecast to affect central New Zealand, and warnings are in place for Marlborough, Wellington, and Wairarapa south of Masterton. Gusts could reach 130km/h from Sunday evening to early Monday morning.

This continues to be a significant adverse weather event, affecting many parts of the country. The heavy rain is likely to cause slips and surface flooding, and the severe easterly gales could make driving hazardous, lift roofs, and bring down trees and powerlines. People are strongly advised to exercise caution, and to stay up to date with the latest forecasts, Warnings and Watches.

HEAVY RAIN WARNING

AREA/S AFFECTED

Coromandel Peninsula and Bay of Plenty west of Kawerau

FORECAST

Heavy rain continues to fall. In the 12 hours from 8pm today to 8am Sunday, expect a further 50-60mm of rain to accumulate. Peak intensities of 10-15mm per hour.

AREA/S AFFECTED

The ranges of Gisborne and eastern Bay of Plenty

FORECAST

Heavy rain has set in. In the 16 hours from 8pm today to noon Sunday, expect 80 to 100mm of rain to accumulate. Peak intensities of 10-15mm per hour this evening (Saturday).

AREA/S AFFECTED

The ranges of Hawkes Bay

FORECAST

Heavy rain has set in. In the 12 hours from 8pm Saturday to 8am Sunday, expect a further 60 to 90mm of rain to accumulate. Peak intensities of 15-20mm per hour this evening (evening).

AREA/S AFFECTED

All of Nelson

FORECAST

Heavy easterly rain has set in this evening. The flow should turn north to northwesterly during Sunday. In the 34 hours from 8pm Saturday to 6am Monday, expect 150 to 200mm of rain to accumulate in the ranges and about 100mm over the Tasman Bay lowlands.

FREEZING LEVEL: Above 3500 metres.

AREA/S AFFECTED

The ranges of Marlborough, including the Kaikoura Ranges

FORECAST

Heavy easterly rain is forecast to set in this evening (Saturday), then later Sunday the flow should turn northwest. In the 24 hours from 9pm today to 9pm Sunday, expect 120 to 150mm of rain to accumulate.

FREEZING LEVEL: Above 4000 metres.

AREA/S AFFECTED

Hills and coastal ranges of South Canterbury and North Otago

FORECAST

Strong northeasterlies and rain are forecast for South Canterbury and North Otago through most of Sunday, easing late evening. In the 18 hours from 3am to 9pm Sunday expect 70 to 100mm on the coastal hills and ranges. During this time 30 to 50mm rain is likely on the coastal lowlands.

AREA/S AFFECTED

Buller north of Westport

FORECAST

Rain is forecast to become heavy Sunday afternoon, as northeast winds turn strong northwesterly. In the 12 hours from 3pm Sunday till 3am Monday, expect 80-120mm of rain to accumulate about the ranges. Peak intensities of 15-25mm/hr Sunday evening.

FREEZING LEVEL: 3500 metres.

STRONG WIND WARNING

AREA/S AFFECTED

Auckland

FORECAST

Severe easterly gales are expected to continue this evening with gusts of 120 km/h. Winds should gradually ease tonight.

AREA/S AFFECTED

The Kaimai Range, and Waikato near the Kaimais, including Thames

FORECAST

Severe easterly gales are expected to continue this evening, with gusts of 130 km/h in exposed places. Winds should ease tonight.

AREA/S AFFECTED

Marlborough Wellington and Wairarapa south of Masterton

FORECAST

Northwest winds are expected to rise to gale in exposed parts of Marlborough, Wellington and Wairarapa south of Masterton Sunday evening. From about 8pm Sunday to 6am Monday severe gales are expected with gusts of 130 km/h.

WARNINGS NO LONGER IN FORCE

HEAVY RAIN WARNINGS HAVE BEEN LIFTED FOR: Northland

Heavy rain is easing this evening, and the warning has been lifted.

STRONG WIND WARNINGS HAVE BEEN LIFTED FOR: Northland

Winds have eased and the warning has been lifted.

NEXT SEVERE WEATHER WARNING WILL BE ISSUED AT OR BEFORE 9:00 am Sunday 16-Mar-2014

Severe Weather Outlook

Issued: 2:09pm Saturday 15 Mar 2014
Valid from Monday 17 March 2014 to Thursday 20 March 2014

Cyclone Lusi is expected to cross the South Island overnight Sunday, then move away to the east and weaken on Monday. Warnings and Watches are in force for many regions.

On Monday, as Lusi moves eastwards, northwest gales are likely in parts of central New Zealand. Warnings are already in place for Marlborough, Wellington and southern Wairarapa for Sunday evening to Monday morning, hence high confidence is indicated in those areas, and there is moderate confidence of severe northwest gales in parts of Canterbury too. The trend, however, is for winds to ease during Monday.

The moist northwest winds also bring continued rain for northern Westland,Buller and northwest Nelson, and there is moderate confidence of significant heavy rain in these areas through Monday morning.

From about midday Monday, a new front moves onto the lower South Island,bringing more heavy rain, and there is moderate confidence of significant heavy rain in Fiordland and Westland from Monday into Tuesday.

Finally, a second front should reach Fiordland later on Wednesday, and at this stage we have low confidence of rainfall totals meeting warning criteria there.

map showing severe weather outlook

Low confidence:
a 20% likelihood (or 1 chance in 5) that the event will actually happen.
Moderate confidence:
a 40% likelihood (or 2 chances in 5) that the event will actually happen.
High confidence:
a 60% likelihood (or 3 chances in 5) that the event will actually happen

New issues of this forecast are made available on this site at or before 16:30NZST

You can view the latest Severe Weather Video update here: http://metservice.com/tv/#severe

Please stay up to date with all the latest Severe Warnings and Watches

(All images in this section: metservice.com) (Click on images to link to source)

Press Reports

Australia Network News

Strong wind warnings in place in New Zealand as ex-Tropical Cyclone Lusi passes North Island

 

Photo: Ex-Tropical Cyclone Lusi brings strong and gale force winds to New Zealand’s North Island, March 15, 2014. (MetService)

 

New Zealand’s weather bureau has issued strong wind and gale force wind warnings as ex-tropical cyclone Lusi moves over the North Island.

The Met Service says wind gusts of around 130 kilometres an hour have been recorded at Cape Reinga, on the northwest tip of the North Island.

Auckland has experienced wind gusts of almost 90 kilometres an hour.

There have also been heavy rainfalls overnight on the North Island, and warnings are in place for the South Island as the depression moves south.

The weather system is expected to cross the South Island on Sunday then weaken as it moves east on Monday.

So far, 10 people have died and two are missing in Vanuatu after Cyclone Lusi hit the Pacific nation.

Shadrack Welegtabit, the director of the National Disaster Management Office in Port Vila says another tropical low is forming in the east of the country.

While it is developing, it is not expected to become a cyclone soon.

The UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs says cyclone Lusi caused widespread flooding and damaged crops.

ABC/AFP

MARITIME

New Zealand

Coastal Storm Warnings

Storm warnings for: CASTLEPOINT, CONWAY, COOK

Coastal Gale Warnings

Gale warnings for: ABEL, BRETT, CHALMERS, COLVILLE, GREY, KAIPARA, PLENTY, PORTLAND, RAGLAN, RANGITATA, STEPHENS

Auckland VHF

GALE WARNING A23 FOR MANUKAU AND WAITEMATA HARBOURS, AND THE HAURAKI GULF
Northeast 35 knots gusting 45 knots easing to northerly 25 knots gusting 35 knots this morning and below advisory criteria this afternoon.
GALE WARNING A23 FOR BREAM HEAD TO CAPE COLVILLE
Northeast 40 knots gusting 50 knots easing to northerly 25 knots gusting 35 knots this morning and below advisory criteria this afternoon.
This warning cancels and replaces ADVISORY A20

Oceanic Warnings

High seas warnings for: FORTIES, PACIFIC, SOUTHERN, SUBTROPIC

METAREA XIV

PassageWeather the FREE sailing weather website

http://www.passageweather.com/

Do not use any information on this site for life or death decisions. All information is intended as supplementary to official sources. Kindly refer to your country’s official weather agency/government website for local warnings, advisories and bulletins.

Norfolk Island (AUS)/ Auckland (NZ): Ex Tropical Cyclone 08F JUNE 191200Z nr 29S 166E , moving SSE at 20 knots (MetService NZ) – 190114 1444z

Tropical Cyclone 08F JUNE (RSMC Nadi)

TROPICAL CYCLONE 10P JUNE (JTWC)

Ex-Tropical Cyclone June: A Cyclone WARNING is current for Norfolk Island, Australia (BoM)

June currently headed toward Norfolk Island, AUS, then Auckland, NZ

(G: Some images, despite being correct at time of edit, for some reason are not updating  on the finished post. Please check time stamps carefully. Most images link to source if clicked upon. Some quick updates may be found in comments at bottom of page)

(Image: wunderground.com) 5 day forecast (Click image for source)

(Image: wunderground.com) Satellite (Click image for source)

RSMC Nadi Tropical Cyclone Warning Centre

TROPICAL CYCLONE FORECAST TRACK MAP

 

Tropical Cyclone JUNE

Tropical Cyclone Warning Number 44 issued 1321 UTC Saturday 18 January 2014

 

Current and Past Cyclone Details Forecast Cyclone Details
(at 24, 48 and 72 hours from issue)
Current Location and Intensity Number
Very Destructive Hurricane Force Winds
Destructive Storm Force Winds
Damaging Gale Force Winds
Past Track and Movement
Past Location and Intensity Number
Forecast Location and Intensity Number
Very Destructive Wind Boundary
Destructive Wind Boundary
Gale Force Wind Boundary
Most Likely Future Track
Range of Likely Tracks over 72 hours

 

The forecast path shown above is the Nadi’s best estimate of the cyclone’s future movement and intensity. There is always some uncertainty associated with tropical cyclone forecasting and the grey zone indicates the range of likely tracks.
Name:  Tropical Cyclone JUNE

 

Details:

Time (UTC) Intensity Category Latitude
(decimal deg.)
Longitude
(decimal deg.)
Estimated Position
Accuracy (km)
0hr 12 pm January 18 1 22.4S 164.8E 110
+6hr 6 pm January 18 1 23.8S 165.1E 140
+12hr 12 am January 19 tropical low 25.3S 165.6E 165
+18hr 6 am January 19 tropical low 26.8S 166.0E 195
+24hr 12 pm January 19 tropical low 28.2S 166.9E 220
+36hr 12 am January 20 tropical low 30.9S 168.8E 280
+48hr 12 pm January 20 tropical low 33.2S 171.2E 345
+60hr 12 am January 21 tropical low 35.5S 174.2E 430
+72hr 12 pm January 21 tropical low 38.3S 177.3E 520

 

Fiji time is UTC +12 hours.
For example, 0000 UTC Saturday is 1200 Saturday Fiji time.
For example, 1800 UTC Saturday is 0600 Sunday Fiji time.

Category Cyclone 1 has mean winds 34-47 knots with a central pressure greater than 985 hPa
Category Cyclone 2 has mean winds 48-63 knots with a central pressure 985-970 hPa
Category Cyclone 3 has mean winds 64-85 knots with a central pressure 970-945 hPa
Category Cyclone 4 has mean winds 86-107 knots with a central pressure 945-910 hPa
Category Cyclone 5 has mean winds greater than 107 knots with a central pressure less than 910 hPa

 

The next TC Forecast Track Map is scheduled to be issued within six hours.

 
TROPICAL DISTURBANCE ADVISORY NUMBER A11 ISSUED FROM RSMC NADI
Jan 18/1946 UTC 2014 UTC.

EX-TROPICAL CYCLONE JUNE 08F CENTRE 997HPA WAS LOCATED NEAR 23.6S
165.1E AT 181800 UTC. POSITION POOR ON HR MTSAT EIR IMAGERY AND
PERIPHERAL SURFACE REPORTS. EX-TROPICAL CYCLONE MOVING
SOUTH-SOUTHEAST AT ABOUT 10 KNOTS. MAXIMUM 10-MINUTE AVERAGE WINDS
NEAR THE CENTRE ESTIMATED AT ABOUT 30 KNOTS.

DEEP CONVECTION HAS DECREASED SIGNIFICANTLY PAST 12 HOURS AND LIES TO
THE SOUTHEAST OF THE EXPOSED LLCC. SYSTEM LIES IN A HIGH SHEARED
ENVIRONMENT. SST AROUND 26 DEGREES CELCIUS. SYSTEM CONTINUES TO BE
STEERED TO THE SOUTH-SOUTHEAST BY A NORTH-NORTHWEST DEEP LAYER MEAN
FLOW. DVORAK ANALYSIS BASED ON SHEAR PATTERN, LLCC SHEARED 85NM FROM
DEEP CONVECTION YEILDING DT OF 2.0, MET=1.5 AND PT=1.5. FT BASED ON
MET THUS, T1.5/2.5/W1.0/24HRS.

GLOBAL MODELS AGREE ON A SOUTH-SOUTHEASTWARD MOVEMENT WITH FURTHER
WEAKENING.

THIS WILL BE THE FINAL TROPICAL DISTURBANCE ADVISORY ON EX-TROPICAL
CYCLONE JUNE.

Australian Government - Bureau of Meteorology

AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT BUREAU OF METEOROLOGY
TROPICAL CYCLONE WARNING CENTRE BRISBANE

NORFOLK ISLAND TROPICAL CYCLONE FORECAST TRACK MAP

Ex-Tropical Cyclone June

Issued at 12:16 am NFT Monday 20 January 2014 based on international data at 11:30 pm NFT. Refer to Norfolk Island Tropical Cyclone Advice.

 

 

Community Threat

Warning Zone
Gales within 24 hours
example of orange colour
Watch Zone
Gales from 24-48 hours
example of yellow colour

Past Cyclone Details

Past Location and Intensity Number
example of icon
Past Track and Movement
example of track

Current Cyclone Details

Current Location and Intensity Number
example of icon
Very Destructive Winds
example of region
Destructive Winds
example of region
Strong Gale Force Winds
example of region

Forecast Cyclone Details
(Up to 72 hours from time of issue)

Forecast Location and Intensity Number
example of icon
Very Destructive Wind Boundary
example of region
Destructive Wind Boundary
example of region
Strong Gale Force Wind Boundary
example of region
Most Likely Future Track
example of track
Range of Likely Tracks of Cyclone Centre
example of region

The forecast path shown above is the Bureau’s best estimate of the cyclone’s future movement and intensity. There is always some uncertainty associated with tropical cyclone forecasting and the grey zone indicates the range of likely tracks of the cyclone centre.

Due to the uncertainty in the future movement, the indicated winds will almost certainly extend to regions outside the rings on this map. The extent of the warning and watch zones reflects this.

This advice is for land-based communities, marine warnings will be issued from New Zealand.

Note: Information in text warning may have been issued at a different time to the latest track data.
Remarks:

EX-TROPICAL CYCLONE JUNE is currently passing to the west of Norfolk Island and is expected to continue moving in a southeast direction for the next 24 hours. The impacts on Norfolk Island are expected to be similar to a Category 1 tropical cyclone.

Damaging winds averaging about 75 kilometres per hour, with gusts to about 110 kilometres per hour, are currently occurring on Norfolk Island and will persist for the next 6 to 12 hours.

Damaging surf, which may lead to localised damage and coastal erosion, and abnormally high tides, which may cause sea water flooding of low lying areas, may occur along the foreshore tonight and during Monday.

Name:  Ex-Tropical Cyclone June

Details:

Time (NFT) Intensity Category Latitude
(decimal deg.)
Longitude
(decimal deg.)
Estimated Position
Accuracy (km)
0hr 12 am January 20 tropical low 29.1S 166.6E 85
+6hr 6 am January 20 tropical low 30.7S 167.4E 105
+12hr 12 pm January 20 tropical low 32.0S 168.3E 130
+18hr 6 pm January 20 tropical low 33.1S 169.5E 150
+24hr 12 am January 21 tropical low 34.0S 170.8E 175
+36hr 12 pm January 21 tropical low 36.3S 174.7E 210
+48hr 12 am January 22 tropical low XXX XXX XXX
+60hr 12 pm January 22 tropical low XXX XXX XXX
+72hr 12 am January 23 tropical low XXX XXX XXX

This warning is also available through TV and Radio broadcasts, the Bureau’s website at http://www.bom.gov.au or call 1300 659 218. The Bureau and Norfolk Island Emergency Services would appreciate this warning being broadcast regularly.
Norfolk Island Time = UTC + 11hrs 30min
Australian Eastern Daylight Time = UTC + 11hrs
Australian Eastern Standard Time = UTC + 10hrs
The next Forecast Track Map will be issued by 3:30 am NFT Monday

IDQ20064
Australian Government Bureau of Meteorology
Queensland
Issued at 12:15 am NFT Monday 20 January 2014 based on international data at
11:30 pm NFT

Media: The Standard Emergency Warning Signal should NOT be used with this
warning.

TOP PRIORITY FOR IMMEDIATE BROADCAST
NORFOLK ISLAND TROPICAL CYCLONE ADVICE NUMBER 15

A Cyclone WARNING remains current for Norfolk Island.

At 11:30 pm NFT, the centre of Ex-Tropical Cyclone June was estimated to be 130
kilometres west of Norfolk Island and moving south southeast at 33 kilometres
per hour.

EX-TROPICAL CYCLONE JUNE is currently passing to the west of Norfolk Island and
is expected to continue moving in a southeast direction for the next 24 hours.
The impacts on Norfolk Island are expected to be similar to a Category 1
tropical cyclone.

Damaging winds averaging about 75 kilometres per hour, with gusts to about 110
kilometres per hour, are currently occurring on Norfolk Island and will persist
for the next 6 to 12 hours.

Damaging surf, which may lead to localised damage and coastal erosion, and
abnormally high tides, which may cause sea water flooding of low lying areas,
may occur along the foreshore tonight and during Monday.

Details of Ex-Tropical Cyclone June at 11:30 pm NFT:
.Centre located near…… 29.1 degrees South 166.6 degrees East
.Location accuracy…….. within 85 kilometres
.Recent movement………. towards the south southeast at 33 kilometres per hour
.Wind gusts near centre… 110 kilometres per hour
.Severity category…….. below cyclone intensity
.Central pressure……… 992 hectoPascals

The Community and Visitors to Norfolk Island should remain inside until
Ex-Tropical Cyclone June has passed and listen to the next advice at 3:30am NFT.
– Information is available from Emergency Management Norfolk Island [+6723 999]
or the Norfolk Island Police Force [+6723 22222]
– For cyclone preparedness and safety advice, visit the Norfolk Island
Administration website at: http://www.info.gov.nf/Emergency_Management
– For emergency assistance call the Emergency Management Norfolk Island on +6723
999 [for assistance with storm damage, rising flood water, fallen trees on
buildings or roof damage].

The next advice will be issued by 3:30 am NFT Monday 20 January.

This warning is also available through TV and Radio broadcasts, the Bureau’s
website at http://www.bom.gov.au or call 1300 659 218. The Bureau and Norfolk Island
Emergency Services would appreciate this warning being broadcast regularly.

This advice is for land-based communities, marine warnings will be issued from
New Zealand.

Norfolk Island Time = UTC + 11hrs 30min
Australian Eastern Daylight Time = UTC + 11hrs
Australian Eastern Standard Time = UTC + 10hrs

TCWC-Wellington/Meteorological Service of New Zealand, Ltd.
http://www.metservice.co.nz/forecasts/severe_weather.asp

TSR logoSW Pacific: Storm Alert issued at 18 Jan, 2014 0:00 GMT

Tropical Storm JUNE (10P) currently located near 20.0 S 163.7 E is forecast to strike land to the following likelihood(s) at the given lead time(s):

Yellow Alert Country(s) or Province(s)
New Caledonia
        probability for TS is 80% currently
Yellow Alert City(s) and Town(s)
Koumac (20.5 S, 164.3 E)
        probability for TS is 65% within 12 hours
    Kone (21.0 S, 164.8 E)
        probability for TS is 55% within 12 hours

Note that
Yellow Alert (Elevated) is CAT 1 or above to between 10% and 30% probability, or TS to above 50% probability.
CAT 1 means Tropical Cyclone strength winds of at least 74 mph, 119 km/h or 64 knots 1-min sustained.
TS means Tropical Storm strength winds of at least 39 mph, 63 km/h or 34 knots 1-min sustained.

For graphical forecast information and further details please visit http://www.tropicalstormrisk.com/

Storm Tracker Map

Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC)

https://i0.wp.com/www.usno.navy.mil/NOOC/nmfc-ph/RSS/jtwc/warnings/sh1014.gif

https://i2.wp.com/www.usno.navy.mil/NOOC/nmfc-ph/RSS/jtwc/satshots/10P_172332sams.jpg

WTPS31 PGTW 190900
MSGID/GENADMIN/JOINT TYPHOON WRNCEN PEARL HARBOR HI//
SUBJ/TROPICAL CYCLONE 10P (JUNE) WARNING NR 005//
RMKS/
1. TROPICAL CYCLONE 10P (JUNE) WARNING NR 005    
01 ACTIVE TROPICAL CYCLONE IN SOUTHPAC
MAX SUSTAINED WINDS BASED ON ONE-MINUTE AVERAGE
WIND RADII VALID OVER OPEN WATER ONLY

WARNING POSITION:
190600Z — NEAR 27.9S 165.7E
MOVEMENT PAST SIX HOURS – 175 DEGREES AT 16 KTS
POSITION ACCURATE TO WITHIN 035 NM
POSITION BASED ON CENTER LOCATED BY SATELLITE
PRESENT WIND DISTRIBUTION:
MAX SUSTAINED WINDS – 035 KT, GUSTS 045 KT
WIND RADII VALID OVER OPEN WATER ONLY
BECOMING EXTRATROPICAL
REPEAT POSIT: 27.9S 165.7E

FORECASTS:
12 HRS, VALID AT:
191800Z — 31.6S 167.6E
MAX SUSTAINED WINDS – 030 KT, GUSTS 040 KT
WIND RADII VALID OVER OPEN WATER ONLY
EXTRATROPICAL

REMARKS:
190900Z POSITION NEAR 28.8S 166.2E.
TROPICAL CYCLONE 10P (JUNE), LOCATED APPROXIMATELY 158 NM
NORTHWEST OF KINGSTON, NORFOLK ISLAND, HAS TRACKED SOUTHWARD AT
16 KNOTS OVER THE PAST SIX HOURS. ANIMATED MULTISPECTRAL SATELLITE
IMAGERY (MSI) DEPICTS A FULLY-EXPOSED LOW-LEVEL CIRCULATION CENTER
(LLCC) THAT HAS BECOME ELONGATED AND IS UNDERGOING EXTRA-TROPICAL
TRANSITION (ETT). RECENT ANIMATED WATER VAPOR IMAGERY INDICATES THE
BULK OF THE CONVECTION ACROSS THE SOUTHERN SEMI-CIRCLE HAS SHALLOWED
AS THE SYSTEM HAS TRACKED OVER RELATIVELY COOL SEA SURFACE
TEMPERATURES. THE SYSTEM IS EXPECTED TO SUCCUMB TO INCREASING
VERTICAL WIND SHEAR AS IT BECOMES FURTHER EMBEDDED IN THE BAROCLINIC
BOUNDARY AND COMPLETES ETT AS A COLD CORE LOW OVER THE NEXT 12 HOURS.
THIS IS THE FINAL WARNING ON THIS SYSTEM BY THE JOINT TYPHOON WRNCEN
PEARL HARBOR HI. THE SYSTEM WILL BE CLOSELY MONITORED FOR SIGNS OF
REGENERATION. MAXIMUM SIGNIFICANT WAVE HEIGHT AT 190600Z IS 10 FEET.
//
NNNN

MARITIME

METAREA14 / GALE_STORM_WARNING_SOUTH_25S / 1203

WWNZ40 NZKL 191203 GALE WARNING 239 THIS AFFECTS OCEAN AREA: SUBTROPIC AT 191200UTC OVER WATERS SOUTH OF 25S. LOW 992HPA, FORMER CYCLONE JUNE, NEAR 29S 166E MOVING SOUTHSOUTHEAST 20KT. WITHIN 240 NAUTICAL MILES OF LOW: CLOCKWISE 40KT. GALE AREA MOVING WITH LOW. THIS WARNING CANCELS AND REPLACES WARNING 237.

Subtropic high seas forecast

Issued by MetService at 7:22pm Sunday 19 Jan 2014 NZ

Forecast valid to 1:00am Tuesday 21 Jan 2014: South of 37S and east of 178E and west 175W: Northwest quarter 25kt, easing by 200000UTC. Low 990hPa, former Cyclone JUNE, near 27S 165E moving southsoutheast 20kt. Within 300 nautical miles of Low in sector from south through west to northeast: Clockwise 25kt and gales as in warning 237. Within 420 nautical miles of Low in sector from northeast through southeast to south: Clockwise 25kt and gales as in warning 237. Within 420 nautical miles of Low: Poor visibility in areas of rain and areas of heavy swell.

Outlook following 72 hours

Low, former Cyclone June, expected near 34S 170E at 201200UTC, continuing to move southeast. Clockwise 25kt to gale near low until 221200UTC, with heavy northerly swells in southeast quadrant. High expected near 40S 145E at 221200UTC, extending ridge northeast,then moving east.

GALE WARNING 239
This affects ocean area: SUBTROPIC
AT 191200UTC
Over waters south of 25S.
Low 992hPa, former Cyclone JUNE, near 29S 166E moving southsoutheast 20kt.
Within 240 nautical miles of low: Clockwise 40kt.
Gale area moving with low.
This warning cancels and replaces warning 237.

Issued at 1:04am Monday 20 Jan 2014

New issues of this forecast are made available on this site at or before:
NZDT: 8:15am, 8:15pm
NZST: 9:15am, 9:15pm
Updates and amendments may be issued at any time.

 

Critically injured woman rescued from glacier

Sykose Extreme Sports News

English: Westpac Rescue Helicopter, Taken at t...

A Wellington man has helped carry a critically injured woman off a South Island glacier after she broke both her legs.

In an exhausting effort, the man and a male climbing colleague carried the injured Christchurch woman for about 45 minutes last night, through the snow and ice of the Arrowsmith Range, northwest of Mt Hutt, to reach a rescue helicopter.

An avalanche struck just 200 metres from the group as they were walking to the chopper, buffeted by winds of about 40-50 kmh.

Rescuers said the woman needed urgent medical attention and may have died if not for her personal locator beacon.

View original post 259 more words

NZ: SEVERE WEATHER WARNING for Bay of Plenty, Taranaki, Nelson, Marlborough & E Otago – Flash flood chaos in Tauranga – 200413 1430z

SEVERE WEATHER WARNING

(See bottom of page)

(Photo: mediaspanonline.com)

The Fire Service received around 100 calls during a three to four hour period as torrential rain swept Tauranga early today. Shortly before 6am police warned the rain was causing significant flash flooding across Mt Maunganui.

MetService figures showed around 75mm of rain fell in the two hours to 6am in Tauranga.

Fire Service Tauranga senior station officer Phil Price said industrial buildings, shops and houses had been flooded, while cars had been partially submerged in parts of Mt Maunganui.

One industrial building at Mt Maunganui was badly hit, with water flowing through two floors, including through a computer suite. Water had been up to half a metre deep in some shops in the area, while some householders now faced the prospect of having to lift their carpet after water got into their homes.

“The main problem, after months and months of dry weather … all of a sudden you get a deluge and months of litter and accumulation from people’s roofs and guttering gets moved very quickly to downpipes which just block,” Price said.

“At a number of industrial premises that’s exactly what happened. It just overflowed into the premises.”

Every available fire truck from Tauranga city had been in use during the heavy rain, with others brought in from outlying areas including Katikati and Te Puke. Sergeant Steve Hindmarsh at Tauranga police said some of the worst flooding had been on the approaches to the Tauranga harbour bridge on the Mt Maunganui side.

All four lanes had been affected at one point and traffic had been stopped. Some streets in Papamoa and Mt Maunganui had also been closed because flood waters had been too deep. At one place firefighters had pushed floating cars out of an area of deep flooding, Hindmarsh said. “We’ve had a real deluge.”

Fire Service northern communications shift manager Steve Smith said around 100 calls due to the rain in Tauranga were received between about 2.30am and 6.30am, when the rain appeared to ease.

Most calls were for flooding in houses and shops, while a few people had been trapped in their vehicles by rising waters.

No one had been hurt.

The calls had started coming in from the suburb of Otumoetai, before sweeping across to Mt Maunganui and Papamoa.

Around 3.40am the MetService issued a severe weather warning for parts of Bay of Plenty west of Whakatane, with up to 100mm of rain expected by 3pm today.

The heaviest falls were expected near the coast, where peak intensities could reach 30mm an hour this morning, the warning said. Up to 130mm of rain was also forecast during the 20 hours to 6pm today in the ranges of Nelson and Motueka.
Saturday, 20 April, 2013 at 03:22 (03:22 AM) UTC RSOE

Tauranga roads closed due to flooding

Saturday April 20 2013 20:24 (local time)

Bay of Plenty motorists are dealing with closed roads in southern Tauranga, after heavy rain caused flooding.

Near the crematorium on Pyes Pa Road, State Highway 36 is closed through to The Lakes subdivision.

And on State Highway 2, the road is closed from Barkes Corner on Pyes Pa Road through to the Oropi roundabout.

Weather

Bursts of heavy rain forecast for Bay of Plenty, Taranaki, Nelson, Marlborough and eastern Otago are detailed in the latest MetService Severe Weather Warning.(below)

There could be as much as 120 millimetres of rain overnight and tomorrow.

The bands of heavy rain and thunderstorms are part of a low pressure system moving south-east across northern and central New Zealand during the weekend.

Bay of Plenty hit by flooding

“UPDATED: 7.45am Serious flooding throughout the Bay of Plenty overnight has emergency services urging residents to take care in the wet weather and stay inside if possible.

The torrential rain overnight has seen trapped cars and blocked roads with fire crews kept busy attending 72 call outs so far this morning.

Police say torrential rain in Mount Maunganui is causing significant flash flooding across the area.

At this stage a number of roads are water logged including the Tauranga Harbour Bridge, areas around Hewletts Road and parts of Papamoa with police reducing traffic to a single lane at the intersection of Hewletts Road and Tasman Quay to get through the flooding.

Our reporter on the scene says shopkeepers on Maunganui Rd are sweeping flooded water from their premises and many streets are waterlogged. Cordons are in place at several intersections, closing off areas of the Mount and Papamoa.

Tauranga Fire senior station officer Phil Price says he has not seen anything like it in quite a few years with 72 call outs attended, mostly in Otumoetai and Greerton before the Mount area, and the number rising quickly as people wake up this morning.

We had 13 on the go and 30 waiting on top of the 72 we had attended according to northern communications.

Fire appliances from Papamoa, Te Puke, Katikati and Omokoroa have been called in to help manage the excessive amount of call outs.

Phil says people need to make sure their drains and down pipes are cleared to prevent the water blocking up and flooding over.

Theres a lot of wet houses out there.

Sergeant Steve Hindmarsh says the Tauranga Harbour Bridge is very touch and go with traffic reduced to one lane to get through the flooding.

He says parts of Papamoa roads are also under water.

The best advice is dont go outside and dont drive as your car could stop from being submerged and it creates bow waves which go into peoples houses.

Driving conditions are extremely hazardous and Steve advises motorists to avoid the Mount Maunganui area until this eases.

Thank you for all the photos being sent in. We have been innundated and will make sure everyone is credited when we get a chance. Keep them coming.

Keep checking on SunLive for more updates.” – sunlive.co.nz

Road closures and evacuations


Emergency services in Mt Maunganui.

A police car needed rescuing after being disabled by floodwaters in Tay Street.

SEVERE WEATHER WARNING.

ISSUED BY MetService AT 9:43 pm 20-Apr-2013 (Local Time)

Bursts of heavy rain for Bay of Plenty, Taranaki, Nelson and Marlborough. A period of rain for eastern Otago.

A deep low is expected to remain slow moving west of the South Island overnight Saturday and during Sunday. Bands of heavy rain and possible thunderstorms associated with the low are expected to move southeast across northern and central New Zealand. In the Bay of Plenty, Taranaki especially about the Mountain, the ranges of Nelson, the Marlborough Sounds and in the eastern ranges of Marlborough from Blenheim to Kaikoura, rainfall is expected to reach warning amounts. In these areas 90-120mm could accumulate in an 18 to 24 hour period. Note, in the Bay of Plenty and Taranaki embedded thunderstorms could produce localised downpours and people are advised to keep up to date with severe thunderstorm watches and warnings.

In the east of the South Island a moist northeast flow is expected to bring a period of sustained rain to eastern Otago from early Sunday morning to afternoon. 65mm could fall in a 15 hour period in eastern Otago north of Dunedin, with 40mm accumulating in a 12 hour period.

People should be aware that the heavy rain is likely to cause streams and rivers to rise rapidly, surface flooding and slips.

HEAVY RAIN WARNING

AREA/S AFFECTED

Bay of Plenty west of Whakatane

FORECAST

Heavy rain is expected at times overnight Saturday and Sunday morning. In the 15 hours from 9pm Saturday, 70 to 100mm could accumulate. Peak rainfall rates of 25-35mm/hr are possible with thunderstorms.

AREA/S AFFECTED

Ranges of Nelson

FORECAST

Bursts of heavy rain in a north to northeast flow are expected to continue until Sunday afternoon. In the 18 hours from 9pm Saturday, 100-120mm could accumulate in the ranges of the Tasman District, while 80-100mm could accumulate in the ranges of Nelson. Peak rainfall intensities of around 15mm per hour.

FREEZING LEVEL: 2600 metres.

AREA/S AFFECTED

The Marlborough Sounds, and the eastern ranges from Blenheim to Kaikoura

FORECAST

Bursts of heavy rain are expected to continue until Sunday afternoon. In the 18 hours from 9pm Saturday, a further 80-100mm could accumulate, with peak intensities of around 15mm per hour.

FREEZING LEVEL: 2400 metres.

AREA/S AFFECTED

Taranaki

FORECAST

Heavy rain is expected at times overnight Saturday and during Sunday. In the 15 hours from midnight Saturday, 100-130mm is likely to accumulate on the Mountain, while 60- 80mm is possible in northern parts of Taranaki. Peak rainfall rates of 25-35mm/hr are possible with thunderstorms, mainly on the Mountain.

AREA/S AFFECTED

Eastern Otago north of Dunedin

FORECAST

Rain is expected to develop overnight Saturday. In the 15 hours from 3am Sunday, 65mm could accumulate in eastern Otago north of Dunedin, with 40mm accumulating in a 12 hour period between 3am and 3pm Sunday. Rainfall rates of 10mm/hr possible.

NEXT SEVERE WEATHER WARNING WILL BE ISSUED AT OR BEFORE 9:00 am Sunday 21-Apr-2013

New Zealand: Injured climber rescued from Mt Awful in Mt Aspiring National Park after 100m fall, alarm raised by distress beacon (PLB) – 280313 2315z

(Photo: farm7.staticflickr.com) Mt Awful in Mt Aspiring National Park, NZ

An injured climber has been rescued by helicopter from Mt Awful in Mt Aspiring National Park, after suffering head injuries following a fall of around 100m.

The Rescue Coordination Centre New Zealand (RCCNZ) received a personal locator beacon (PLB) alert from a party of four climbers at around 11 am. A rescue helicopter from The Helicopter Line Mount Cook, with a specialist Department of Conservation alpine rescue team on board flew to the scene, near the Gillespie Pass (altitude around 1300m).

RCCNZ Search and Rescue Mission Coordinator Dave Wilson said the man, aged in his 60s, was stabilised and flown to Queenstown Hospital. As the full extent of his injuries was not known, a fully equipped air ambulance helicopter from Helicopters Otago, with an ICU retrieval team on board, launched from Dunedin to rendezvous at Queenstown. Medical authorities will decide upon the next course of action.

The man has fallen a considerable distance and requires a some serious medical attention, Mr Wilson said.

This incident again shows the value of carrying a registered distress beacon. Because it was registered, we were quickly able to establish from the partys emergency contact the make-up of the party and their climbing intentions.

It has enabled the injured person to get medical attention as quickly as possible.

The mans condition is not known at this stage.

Beacons can be registered free of charge on the beacons website: www.beacons.org.nz

The remaining members of the party, all New Zealanders, are making their own way down the mountain.” – MNZ 27 March 2013: 2.40pm

For further information contact:
Maritime New Zealand Media Line
Phone 04 499 7318

New Zealand: Great white shark attack kills man on Muriwai Beach on Auckland west coast – 270213 1100z

A witness has described seeing a “huge” shark kill a man off Muriwai Beach on Auckland’s west coast this afternoon.

(Video credit: Youtube user jamesdean69999)

Police have confirmed they shot and hit the shark, believed to be a great white, but said it swam away. Pio Mose watched the attack unfold about 1.30pm while fishing with a group of men on the rocks between Maori Bay and Muriwai Beach.

He saw the “huge” shark attack a man alone swimming from the bay back to the beach about 50 metres from where he was standing.

The man struggled with the shark before it swam away.

He was keeping his head above the water before the shark returned.

“I yelled at him to swim to the rocks. There was blood everywhere. The water was red. It’s pretty scary.”

He said after the second attack three or four other sharks came to the area.

Mr Mose and the other fisherman watched as the shark took the man’s body out to sea and when lifeguards eventually arrived they directed them to where the group of sharks were.

Inspector Shawn Rutene confirmed police shot at the shark, but could not say how many times.

The officer was out on the water in an IRB with three lifeguards – and Mr Rutene said one of them saw a second shark.

It was unclear whether the second shark had been involved in the attack.

He said after being shot the shark “rolled away”, but refused to say whether it was still attacking the man at the time.

Mr Rutene said the victim was a local man. His family were “devastated” and his wife was being supported by Victim Support and police at the scene.

Wednesday, 27 February, 2013 at 04:16 (04:16 AM) UTC RSOE

Other Reports

WELLINGTON (Reuters) – “A New Zealand man was attacked and killed by a great white shark on Wednesday in a rare fatal shark incident in the country, prompting police to open fire.

Police said they fired shots at the shark after a man was fatally bitten at Muriwai beach located around 40 kilometres (25 miles) northwest of Auckland, one of many beaches dotted along the North Island’s west coast that are known for their wild surf.

Rescue crews were quoted by local media as saying the shark was a “white pointer”, commonly known as a great white, measuring roughly 4 meters (13 feet) long. Witnesses said a rescue helicopter also fired shots at the shark.

“We saw the shark fin, and the next minute, boom, the attack came. There was blood everywhere on the water,” eye witness Pio Mosie was quoted by local news website Stuff.co.nz as saying.

“They fired six or seven shots to the shark, three from the police helicopter and a few shots from the lifeguard. I don’t know if they killed the shark or not,” he added.

The head of the local volunteer lifeguard service was quoted as saying they had confirmed that “one or two” sharks were spotted, but none had been seen since the man’s body was removed from the water.

Shark attacks are rare in New Zealand, where water sports and beach holidays are a rite of summer. More than 60 shark species are known to swim in the country’s waters.

Fourteen fatal attacks have been reported since records began around 1837, according to the country’s Department of Conservation, which added that non-fatal shark attacks average roughly two each year.

The last attack linked with a death was in 2009, when a kayaker was mauled by a great white in the nearby Coromandel Peninsula, although whether the victim drowned before the attack has been disputed.

According to the International Shark Attack File, 11 shark fatalities were reported last year, including three in Australia and South Africa, nearly tripling the average annual number of fatalities for 2001 to 2010.” – Reuters

(Reporting by Naomi Tajitsu, editing by Elaine Lies)

Tests confirm medicinal properties of manuka honey – 150213 1720z

(Photo: 4.bp.blogspot.com)

Manuka Honey

“Forget spreading it on your toast. Honey could be better kept in the medicine cabinet.

A study of three types of honey by the University of Technology in Sydney has confirmed that New Zealand manuka is the most effective for treating chronic wounds.

Manuka contains a number of chemicals including methylglyoxal, which inhibits the spread of bacteria.

UTS Professor Liz Harry says unlike antibiotics, bacteria shouldn’t become resistant to manuka honey.

“Honey’s not the be-all and end-all, but the fact that people are avoiding it because they don’t think there’s enough science to it is really not true, because I think there is now,” she said.

“We’ve done some studies recently that show that it’s quite possible that honey will be very powerful, particularly when you use it with antibiotics.”

Other honeys tested also included kanuka and clover.” – abc.net.au

Related:

The Search for NewAntibiotics

Canadian plane missing in Antarctica, found crashed – 270113 1040z –

(Image: wikipedia.org) Antarctica (Click image for source)

Poor weather has forced the suspension of a search for three Canadians on board a missing plane in Antarctica until at least tomorrow.

The plane’s emergency locator beacon was activated on Wednesday night when the plane was en route from the South Pole to the Italian base at Terra Nova Bay.

The New Zealand Rescue Coordination Centre (RCCNZ) says a spotter plane has spent five hours flying over the Queen Alexandra Range but has been unable to find the missing aircraft due to thick cloud.

Search coordinator John Ashby says the missing Canadian-operated Twin-Otter was

(Photo: Timo Breidenstein, wikipedia.org) WinAir De Havilland Canada DHC-6-300 Twin Otter at St. Barthelemy Airport 13 December 2011 – This is not the aircraft missing (Click photo for source)

carrying emergency supplies.

“We do know that they were carrying a three-person survival bag with supplies for at least five days, plus mountain tents,” he said.

He says the forecast is for heavy snow and strong wind overnight.

The rescue centre says there have been snow flurries in the area and wind gusts of up to 160 kilometres per hour.

Another plane and two helicopters are on standby to deploy field teams for a ground search if there is a break in the weather.

New Zealand is coordinating the rescue with US authorities at McMurdo Station.

RCCNZ spokesman Steve Rendle said there were hopes the three men, whose names have not been released, were still alive.

“If the beacon is operating, which it is, that’s a good sign as a heavy landing can tend to prevent the beacon working, so that’s a positive sign at this stage,” he told Radio New Zealand.”

ABC/AFP

“The US National Science Foundation said contact was lost with the plane operated by the Canadian firm Kenn Borek Air on Wednesday while it was halfway through a routine 1,400-kilometer (870-mile) supply flight from the US Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station to the Italian base at Terra Nova Bay.

New Zealand rescue coordination center spokesman Steve Rendle said a joint US-New Zealand rescue team was ready to leave Antarctica’s main McMurdo Base at short notice “if there is a break in the weather.”

A second Twin Otter was scheduled to leave McMurdo on Thursday to set up a camp close to the beacon’s location following unsuccessful search flights by two other aircraft – a DC-3 Dakoto and a US Hercules.” -dw.de

“Bad weather is hindering search efforts, with officials now saying they want to set up a temporary base closer to where the beacon is transmitting to widen the operation.” – BBC News

Related:

27 Jan 2013:

The Canadian Press
Published Saturday, Jan. 26, 2013 6:24AM EST
Last Updated Saturday, Jan. 26, 2013 7:49PM EST

“A Canadian plane that crashed in Antarctica appears to have been on course but may have turned too early while flying through a mountain range, says an official with the agency that confirms the aircraft has been found.

Chris Henshaw, a search and rescue officer with the New Zealand Rescue Co-Ordination Centre, says the wreckage of the Twin Otter lies along the route the plane was intending to fly between the South Pole and an Italian base in Antarctica’s Terra Nova Bay.

The plane, operated by Calgary-based Kenn Borek Air, was reported missing after it failed to reach its destination on Wednesday.

Search crews in aircraft have confirmed that the wreckage has been sighted on a steep slope near the summit of Mount Elizabeth on the Queen Alexandra range, but New Zealand officials said the impact appears to have been direct and would not have been survivable for the three crew members on board.

“From looking at the maps, it is a logical route for it to fly through the mountain range,” Henshaw said about the location of the crash.

“There is a path that they actually sort of follow through. And it looks like the pilot made a turn too early. We don’t know at this stage,” he added.

New Zealand officials say the next of kin of the three men have been informed.

The pilot has been identified by friends as Bob Heath of Inuvik while media reports have identified a second crew member as Mike Denton, a newlywed from Calgary whose photographs of planes appear on the Kenn Borek website.

The third crew member had not yet been identified.

According to a statement released Friday by Kenn Borek Air, helicopter crews and mountain rescue personnel were to attempt to access the crash site on Saturday if weather conditions were favourable.

Henshaw said the weather in the area has improved and it sounded like a helicopter would be capable of landing close to the site. But he said he was still awaiting word on a decision about how they would proceed.

Julie Leroux of the Transportation Safety Board said that since the Twin Otter was operated by a Canadian company, officials here have already started working on a probe into the crash.

Leroux said Canadian investigators have already collected data and conducted interviews, but she said they don’t know yet whether it will be possible to reach the remote crash site.

“The Transportation Safety Board is waiting for more information to determine our next step,” Leroux said Saturday, speaking from Gatineau, Que., where the board is based.

Henshaw said New Zealand’s minister of foreign affairs is working with American and Canadian officials about where to go next with the investigation.

An emergency locator beacon had been detected coming from the site early on, but rescue teams were hampered by bad weather that made it difficult for planes flying over the area to see anything.

On Friday, a break in the weather allowed rescuers to set up a forward base at Beardmore Glacier, about 50 kilometres from the crash site, where there is a landing strip and a fuel depot.

A statement on the Kenn Borek Air website said visual contact with the wreckage was first made by a C-130 Hercules aircraft of the New York Air National Guard, and the sighting was later confirmed by another Twin Otter deployed by the airline.

Kenn Borek Air, which is also a fixture in Canada’s North, has been sending planes to Antarctica for the past 28 years.

Heath has been described as a highly experienced pilot by friends.

Fellow pilot Sebastian Seykora said Heath had been flying in Antarctica for at least a decade.” – cp24.com

New Zealand boat capsize highlights need to wear lifejackets: Family of 3 rescued but 13 year old boy missing – 190113 1450z

https://i2.wp.com/www.calypso-boating.com/index_htm_files/2107.png

At 0637 hours this morning Coastguard received a call on VHF Marine Radio Channel 80 from a member of the public who had come across a capsized vessel off Calypso Bay, near Motuhie Island, in Auckland’s Hauraki Gulf.

The small 4.4m run about Tantifi’ had left Buckland’s Beach up the Tamaki River earlier that morning with 4 persons on board.

They got into trouble whilst passing Coruso Rock where a wave resulted in a sudden shift by a person on board, causing the vessel’s starboard bow to plough into the next wave and capsize the vessel.

All on board were thrown into the water with one surfacing under the vessel.

None were wearing life jackets, however had them in their vessel.

The member of the public started to recover the 4 persons who were all accounted for from the water with Coastguard Rescue Vessels from Howick, Waiheke and Auckland arriving on scene shortly after.

Two of the persons on board were treated by Coastguard volunteers for small injuries while the vessel was recovered and taken under tow back to Buckland’s Beach.

As a 13 year old boy still remains missing following the capsize of the small boat he was on with 3 other family members on Thursday, Coastguard puts out a plea for those New Zealander’s out enjoying the many water ways in and around our coastline to do so safely and to not just take lifejackets but to wear them.

Coastguard Spokesperson, Georgie Smith, said Coastguard can’t stress enough the importance of not just taking lifejackets on a boat trip but wearing them.

“Boats, especially under 6m, can sink very quickly – it’s simple, lifejackets save lives! Not only are you easy to find, but your survival rate is just huge in comparison to not wearing one. How much is a life worth?”

Mrs Smith said safety messages were stressed throughout the year but many people still don’t take them seriously.

“We can only do so much – our volunteers are out there dedicating their time and risking their lives to save others. People need to make sure they are looking out for themselves and that means a correctly fitted lifejacket for everyone on board, and wearing them, especially in small vessels.”

Supported by Giltrap Group’, Coastguard Northern Region re-launches their life jacket awareness events next month at high population boat ramps around Auckland.

Saturday, 19 January, 2013 at 11:24 (11:24 AM) UTC RSOE

New Zealand: Large fire engulfs Auckland roofing site – 081212 1350z

A large fire has broken out in the Auckland suburb of Glen Innes. The fire was at the AHI Roofing plant on Felton Mathew Avenue and reportedly started around 11am.

(Video credit: Youtube user farhadart  – Farhad Art Productions)
Witness, Alan Parker, watched the building burst into flames. “For a long time there was thick, black smoke and flames rising probably six metres up in the air, but now the Fire Brigade seem to have it under control. It’s turned to white smoke, no flames.”

Mr Parker says there’s now a large contingent of firefighters on the site dampening down.

Saturday, 08 December, 2012 at 05:19 (05:19 AM) UTC RSOE

Large fire engulfs Auckland roofing site

Sixteen fire crews and aerial units were required to fight a large blaze at the AHI Roofing site in the Auckland suburb of Glen Innes on Saturday.

nzcity.co.nz reports:

8 December 2012

“Aerial units and more than 16 fire crews were needed to fight a blaze raging at an Auckland industrial site on Saturday.

Firefighters were called after an alarm and several members of the public spotted the fire at AHI Roofing in the industrial area of Felton Mathew Avenue, Glen Inness, just after 11am.

Fire Service senior communicator Tania Matthews said crews were unable to enter the building until after midday.

“We had to use our aerial units to fight the fire,” she told NZ Newswire.

The fire covered a 50m x 25m area but had not threatened any other buildings. No people were caught in it.

Meanwhile, Ms Matthews said seven crews were needed to deal with a 20m x 10m shed fire in Papamoa, east of Tauranga.

Firefighters were cautious at first as they were unsure if there were chemicals in the shed but they were able to control the fire shortly after midday.”

New Zealand: 2 critical, 19 others injured in chemical spill at leather tannery – 111112 1635z

Two people are in a critical condition and 19 others have been injured after breathing in hydrogen sulfide following a chemical spill at New Zealand’s only leather tannery.

Emergency services react to the reported chemical spill at Tasman Tanning. Photo / Stuart Munro / Wanganui Chronicle
(Click photo for source)

Emergency services were called to Tasman Tanning Company in Whanganui just before 5pm (1500 AEDT) on Friday following a chemical spill.

Whanganui District Health Boards spokeswoman Sue Campion told AAP on Friday evening that two people were in critical condition after breathing in hydrogen sulfide and were being flown to Wellington Hospital.

Hydrogen sulfide – a colourless, poisonous and flammable gas – can damage lungs and affect breathing. Ms Campion said 19 others suffered minor to moderate injuries and were being treated at Whanganui Hospital.

About 20 firefighters were at the scene.

Media reported the emergency service staff were wearing chemical suits and there was a strong smell in the air.

Tasman Tanning Company, which started in 1953, employs about 200 staff.

The two people who are in critical condition are company staff. Nineteen people – including a firefighter and five St John Ambulance staff – were treated for minor chemical inhalation but 17 have since been discharged from hospital.

Fire Service Assistant Area Commander Roger Calder told AAP a “cloud” of hydrogen sulfide had been created after two unknown chemicals had mixed.

“I have no idea what caused it, all I know is that two chemicals came together and produced hydrogen sulfide,” he said.

“It is part of the process of tanning hides but of course something has gone wrong and caused it to either get too much or get too little [of one chemical].”

Those who came into contact with the chemical were decontaminated.

Sunday, 11 November, 2012 at 05:33 (05:33 AM) UTC RSOE

“Two people are being flown to Wellington Hospital in a critical condition after being exposed to hydrogen sulfide in a chemical spill at a tanning factory in Wanganui.”  – nzherald.co.nz (links to full story)

Passenger plane finds distressed yacht with passenger’s binoculars

Wales Air Forum

By Sophie Griffiths

An Air Canada passenger plane which was bound for Sydney helped locate a yacht which was in distress in waters between Australia and New Zealand.

The flight was diverted by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority after it spotted an emergency beacon activated in the Tasman Sea.

Pilots reportedly descended to 1,800m altitude and used a passenger’s binoculars to find the vessel, the BBC said.

The boat with its lone sailor, was discovered some 310 miles east of Sydney.

The yachtsman is understood to have been adrift for around one week after losing his mast and running low on fuel. He had left Sydney two weeks earlier.

The Air Canada flight from Vancouver had 270 passengers and 18 crew on board  was diverted after 12 hours into the flight, flying an additional 400km as a result of the diversion, and landing 90 minutes behind schedule.

Sourced from TTG Digital

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Survivor spent 18 hrs in water after fishing vessel with 9 aboard capsized – Report 1 body found – Ongoing search

One survivor has been found after a fishing vessel with nine on board hit a rogue wave and capsized in New Zealand’s Foveaux Strait. The survivor was plucked from the water about 6pm (4pm AEDT) on Thursday, after spending 18 hours in the water.

It has also been reported that one body has been found. Police said the Easy Rider sailed from Bluff on Wednesday evening with three crew and six passengers who were going to be dropped off on the Mutton Bird Islands at the Great South Cape.

The boat failed to rendezvous with a helicopter at about 2pm on Thursday. The helicopter pilot alerted police and they mounted a search and rescue operation.

The survivor was plucked from the sea around Bishops and Clerk Islands, to the west of Stewart Island. He was taken to Southland Hospital where he told police that he was on deck with two others about midnight when a rogue wave hit, causing the boat to capsize almost immediately. He said the rest of the passengers were in the wheelhouse.

“The survivor was able to pull himself up onto the hull where he remained for approximately two hours before the boat sank,” Inspector Lance Todd of Invercargill police said in a statement.

The rescue operation, including two Coastguard vessels, five local vessels, three helicopters, one fixed-wing aircraft, and Marine Radio, was being scaled back around midnight (10pm AEDT) on Thursday. It is planned to start again at 6.30am (4.30am AEDT) on Friday.

Invercargill police could not be contacted for comment on news reports that the body of an eight-year-old boy had been found.

The New Zealand Herald website reported the boat was skippered by Rewai Karetai, 47, who was making a family outing to catch muttonbirds, a seabird also known as sooty shearwaters. They are a delicacy for many indigenous Maori, who have a traditional legal right to take them from their breeding grounds on the small islands off Stewart Island.

Wednesday, 11 April, 2012 at 11:31 (11:31 AM) UTC RSOE

Flash Flood in Fiji – 7 dead, 3 missing, 11,000+ displaced, Epidemic Fear – Update dated 03 April, 2012 at 02:59 UTC

Fijian authorities have warned of possible outbreaks of communicable diseases at evacuation centres filled with people fleeing flooded towns.

Meanwhile the New Zealand Government has made $500,000 available to Fijian authorities as a tropical cyclone threatens to further batter the small island nation. Severe weather pounded Fiji at the weekend, causing flash floods that have left seven people dead and three missing, forced thousands to evacuate their homes and cut off power and water.

A state of natural disaster has been declared for most of Fiji’s Western Division. Rainfall today has slowed and rivers have receded, however the country remains vigilant as a cyclone passes to the west of Fiji.

The Fiji Meteorological Service forecast Tropical Cyclone Daphne would pass at least 500km to the southwest of Nadi, bringing damaging gale force winds to the south-western half of the country and further flooding of low-lying areas.

However the agency has this morning lifted a strong wind warning and a severe flood warning which had been in place for all major rivers and stream. The weather is forecast to clear up by Thursday.

More than 11,000 people in the western division are at 117 evacuation centres in the Western Division. Divisional health inspector Dip Chand told the Fiji Times medical teams have been deployed to the evacuation centres, amid fears of possible outbreaks.

He said strategies had been put in place to prevent or contain diseases. “There should be no grog drinking, smoking or merrymaking allowed at these centres,” he told the Fiji Times.
“People have to respect that there are elderly, women and children at these centres and there needs to be policies in place to address this.”

Nadi’s main road has been closed and is under police guard, the Times reports, and the smell of decomposing food and silt is in the air.

Foreign Minister Murray McCully announced this morning $500,000 will be immediately made available to agencies assisting flood victims in Fiji.

“In addition to the reported deaths thousands have been forced from their homes and into evacuation centres,” Mr McCully said.

“The situation is severe as Fiji is still recovering from January’s floods and many response agencies will not have fully replenished their supplies. ”

New Zealand’s funding will be provided to the Fiji Red Cross, and other non-government agencies well positioned to respond. New Zealand always stands ready to help the people of Fiji when disaster strikes.

“We will continue to monitor the situation closely and will consider further support based on the needs of relief agencies who are working with flood-affected communities,” Mr McCully says.

New Zealand provided $350,000 to the Fiji Red Cross to support the response to severe floods in January and a further $1.5 million to the Fiji Natural Disaster Management Office and to refurbish evacuation centres.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs said 460 New Zealanders were registered as being in Fiji, 118 of them in Nadi. New Zealanders have been advised against all tourist and non-essential travel to parts of the Western Division of Viti Levu, including Nadi and the Coral Coast.

Air New Zealand yesterday cancelled a scheduled A320 flight to Nadi but sent in its place a larger, empty aircraft so it could bring back more stranded passengers.

The Fijian Government has lifted its temporary embargo on airlines carrying passengers on flights into Fiji and Air New Zealand said its next scheduled flight from Auckland to Nadi would go ahead as planned this morning.

“Air New Zealand will continue to monitor weather conditions in Fiji and passengers who are in the Nadi area should check regularly with their hotel for updates,” a spokeswoman said.

Meanwhile, the Salvation Army has launched an appeal to support the flood-ravaged nation. It is requesting financial assistance only – not food or clothing, as it is difficult to get such donations through to Fiji. Auckland-based Radio Apna 990AM has also launched a radio-thon to raise money for those affected. The radio-thon will run until 12am Thursday. – RSOE

A ShelterBox Response Team is also en route from the UK to assess need.