UK: Most hillgoers unprepared for emergencies, Ordnance Survey study reveals – Published 30 Jun 2017 1400z (GMT/UTC)

 Most hillgoers unprepared for emergencies, Ordnance Survey study reveals

“A study by Britain’s national mapping agency has revealed many hillgoers are clueless about what to do if things went wrong.

Ordnance Survey said one in eight of people asked would not know how to deal with a mountain emergency if they had no phone signal.

And three-quarters of recreational walkers don’t plan their route properly or pack the right gear, the survey found.

The figures were released as OS announced it was teaming up with Mountain Rescue England and Wales, the umbrella body for voluntary teams south of the border, to try to reduce outdoor incidents.

There were only 14 days last year where a mountain rescue team in England and Wales wasn’t called out.

In 2016 MREW attended 1,812 callouts, up 170 on the previous year, of which 360 were serious or fatal. Mountain bike incidents also continued to rise in 2016, though not at the same rate as previous years.

OS’s survey of more than 2,000 adults from across Great Britain who enjoy recreational walking and hiking highlighted the need for a more safety-minded approach when venturing outdoors.

A total of 83 per cent of those questioned admitted that if they were in trouble on a mountain and had no phone signal they wouldn’t know what to do. It also revealed how more and more walkers and hikers, especially those from younger generations, are not carrying paper maps, compasses or whistles, and are relying entirely on the functionality of their mobile phones, even though only 28 per cent of all respondents would think to check in advance the availability of a mobile phone signal in the place to where they are heading…..” – Bob Smith, Editor of grough magazine
Thursday 29 June 2017 06:39 PM GMT Click for full story

Calling the emergency services from a mobile phone (Advice from Dartmoor Rescue)

The short video gives important information about dialing the emergency services from a mobile phone in the event of an accident. It answers important questions such as:

  • what�s the difference between 999 and 112?
  • How can you call when your mobile phone is showing no signal?
  • Or if somebody in your party is unconscious and their�s is the only mobile, �how can you bypass the phone security to make that important call and potentially save their life?

All this and more is explained simply and clearly.

So be prepared and watch the video as it could save the life or a family member of friend.

�Help Me� The Secrets of using 112 on a mobile phone in an emergency/accident

You need to register your mobile phone before being able to alert the emergency services, including mountain and cave rescue, via SMS text message. �This is best done�before�you need help. You can register by sending an SMS text message from your mobile phone as follows:

(Goaty: Suggest better to register with 112 rather than 999 � why? see video, but why not both)

sms999.001 - Version 2

More information can be found at the following website:�http://www.emergencysms.org.uk/

“Help Me” The Secrets of using a PLB (Personal Locator Beacon) in an emergency/accident

https://lh3.ggpht.com/_D_E5598eI3o/TSm5QDx_3vI/AAAAAAAACCk/aym4dYflxxg/s1600/mountainrescue.jpgGeneral Mountain/Moorland Advice from Mountain Rescue England & Wales:

Mountains and moorlands can be treacherous places without proper care and there are many, many ways to enjoy the mountain environment, be it walking, climbing, running, cycling or skiing. There�s no subsititute for experience, but there are steps you can take to minimise the chances of getting lost or hurt.

Prepare and plan

  • Develop the mountain skills you need to judge potential hazard, including the ability to read a map.
  • Think about the equipment, experience, capabilities and enthusiasm of your party members, taking into account the time of year, the terrain and the nature of the trip � and choose your routes accordingly.
  • Learn the basic principles of first aid � airway, breathing, circulation and the recovery position. It could make the difference between life and death.

Wear suitable clothing and footwear

  • Wear suitable footwear with a treaded sole, and which provides support for ankles.
  • Clothing should be colourful, warm, windproof and waterproof and always carry spare, including hat and gloves (even in summer the tops and open moorland can still be bitingly cold, and it�s always colder the higher you climb).

Carry food and drink�

  • Take ample food and drink for each member of the party. High energy food such as chocolate and dried fruit are ideal for a quick hit.
  • In cold, wet weather a warm drink is advisable, and always carry water � even in cool weather it�s easy to become dehydrated.
  • Of course, large quantities of water can weight heavy in the rucksack, so take a smaller water bottle and top up when you can � streams on hills are drinkable if fast-running over stony beds.

�and the right equipment

  • A map and compass are essential kit and should be easily accessible � not buried in the rucksack!
  • A mobile phone and GPS are useful tools but don�t rely on your mobile to get you out of trouble � in may areas of the mountains there is no signal coverage.
  • Take a whistle and learn the signal for rescue. Six good long blasts. Stop for one minute. Repeat. Carry on the whistle blasts until someone reaches you and don�t stop because you�ve heard a reply � rescuers may be using your blasts as a direction finder.
  • A torch (plus spare batteries and bulbs) is a must. Use it for signalling in the same pattern as for whistle blasts.
  • At least one reliable watch in the party.
  • Cllimbers and mountain bikers should wear a helmet. In winter conditions, an ice-axe, crampons and survival bag are essential.
  • Emergency survival kit comprising spare clothing and a bivvi bag.
  • New OrdnanceSurvey free smartphone app OSLocate will help walkers in a fix http://www.grough.co.uk/magazine/2014/03/24/ordnance-survey-free-smartphone-app-will-help-walkers-in-a-fix

Before you set out

  • Charge your phone battery! Many accidents occur towards the end of the day when both you and your phone may be low on energy.
  • Check the weather forecast and local conditions. Mountains can be major undertakings and, in the winter months, night falls early.
  • Eat well before you start out.
  • Leave your route plan including start and finish points, estimated time of return and contact details with an appropriate party.

On the hill

  • Keep an eye on the weather and be prepared to turn back if conditions turn against you, even if this upsets a long planned adventure.
  • Make sure party leaders are experienced. Keep together, allow the slowest member of the party to determine the pace, and take special care of the youngest and weakest in dangerous places.
  • Watch for signs of hypothermia, particularly in bad weather � disorientation, shivering, tiredness, pale complexion and loss of circulation in hands or toes, discarding of vital clothing. Children and older people are especially susceptible.
  • If you prefer to go alone, be aware of the additional risk. Let people know your route before you start, stick to it as far as you can and notify them of any changes.
  • If you think you need mountain rescue, get a message to the Police (112/999) as soon as possible and keep injured/exhausted people safe and warm until help reaches you.

Dangers you can avoid

  • Precipices and unstable boulder.
  • Slopes of ice or steep snow, and snow cornices on ridges or gully tops.
  • Very steep grass slopes, especially if frozen or wet.
  • Gullies, gorges and stream beds, and streams in spate.
  • Exceeding your experience and abilities and loss of concentration.

Dangers you need to monitor

  • Weather changes � mist gale, rain and snow may be sudden and more extreme than forecast.
  • Ice on path (know how to use an ice-axe and crampons).
  • Excessive cold or heat (dress appropriately and carry spare clothing!).
  • Exhaustion (know the signs, rest and keep warm).
  • Passage of time � especially true when under pressure � allow extra time in winter or night time conditions.

Check out the Safe in the Hills website � pioneered by the Kirkby Stephen MRT, for more information about how you can keep safe whilst walking in the hills.

How to take care of your feet when hiking�. The key recommendations are:

  • Choose the right hiking boots
  • Trim your toenails
  • Soften any tough skin (which are subject to hard to treat deep blisters)
  • Rest feet when walking

�Avoiding and treating foot blisters for hikers�, as well as giving some useful advice on how to treat blisters, highlights the importance of changing your (decent walking) socks when they get wet

  1. Make sure you have a decent pair of boots
  2. Take plenty of decent hiking socks
  3. Change your socks when they get damp (if you do this as early as possible you have a fighting chance to dry them in your sleeping bag)
  4. Regularly let your feet rest and breath
  5. Regularly apply talc to your feet
  6. If it is raining or very damp, wear gaiters to stop water getting into your boots

Do this and your feet, the most important hiking equipment you have, will thank you!

(Stolen from http://philsorrell.com/2010/03/01/importance-of-foot-care-whilst-hiking/)

Do not use any information on this site for life or death decisions. All information is intended as supplementary to official sources. Kindly refer to your country’s official weather agency/government website for local warnings, advisories and bulletins.

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Heroic fisherman returned to sinking trawler freed liferaft, saving his life and those of his two crew mates – 160213 1150z

“Young Brixham fisherman Joe Moore returned to a sinking trawler to help free a raft, saving his life and those of his two crew mates, an official report has found.

The Brixham-based beam trawler the Betty G sank in July last year after snagging one of her nets while fishing some ten miles off Lyme Bay, Dorset.

  1. Max Didlick (left) and Joe Moore

    Max Didlick (left) and Joe Moore

Skipper Stuart Greene, Max Didlick and 22-year-old Joe managed to launch and scramble aboard the life raft as the vessel started to go under, only to find it was still tethered.

“By 1.45am, the three men had boarded the life raft and were looking for the knife to cut the painter,” a report by the Marine Accident Investigation Branch report said.

“From their sea survival training, they expected to locate the knife on one of the inflatable tubes near the entrance, but they could not find it.

“The younger crewman (Joe Moore) climbed out of the raft and made his way along the starboard side of Betty G to the gallows, where he retrieved a knife. He returned to the raft and cut the painter. Shortly afterwards, Betty G sank.”

The report added: “The life raft undoubtedly saved the lives of the three crew, and this accident is a graphic reminder of the benefits of carrying such equipment.

“Although only recommended for fishing vessels under ten metres in length, proposed legislation intends to mandate the carriage of a life raft in the future.”

The three men spent more than ten hours in the life raft awaiting rescue after neither of the emergency beacons onboard were triggered.

They fired two flares after seeing a ship 3-4 miles away but it did not respond. The next morning, an angling boat and several yacht sails were sighted, but no vessel approached them.

It wasn’t until almost 1pm that they were picked up by the dive boat Blue Turtle, which alerted the coastguard.

The three were airlifted to Portland and examined by a paramedic but did not require hospital treatment and returned to Brixham the same day.

The MAIB found the Betty G had capsized “due to a significant weight imbalance between the beam trawls caused by the load in one net suddenly releasing”.

It said it was “most likely that the load in the starboard net led to that net failing” but could not pinpoint the exact cause because the wreck had not been located and examined.

Investigators recommended that owner Northwest Trawlers Limited “conduct an assessment of the risks associated with the vessel’s mode of fishing and, in particular, to identify and counter the risks associated with the recovery of fishing gear”.

The firm should also “ensure that procedures are established and drills conducted to train crews in the actions required to deal with foreseeable emergencies on board”.” – WMN

UK and Commonwealth: HM The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee – Updated 3 June 2012

The official website of The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee

Queen's Diamond Jubilee logo

The Central Weekend 2 – 5 June 2012

The Central Weekend to celebrate The Queens Diamond Jubilee takes place from Saturday 2 June to Tuesday 5 June 2012, with celebratory activities throughout the UK and across the Commonwealth

If you are considering visiting central London to join in with the celebrations, you may find it useful to visit the Transport for London website

Alternatively, you may wish to consider watching events on one of the many BBC Big Screens around the UK.

For information about the Official Diamond Jubilee Souvenir Programme click here.

Here is our run-down of events over the Diamond Jubilee weekend, including approximate timings:

Saturday 2 June, 2012
The Queen will attend the Epsom Derby.

Sunday 3 June, 2012
The Big Jubilee Lunch: Building on the already popular Big Lunch initiative, people will be encouraged to share lunch with neighbours and friends as part of the Diamond Jubilee celebrations. This may take the form of a traditional street party or a picnic lunch in small or larger groups. This event is being organised by the Big Lunch. Find out more.

The Thames Diamond Jubilee Pageant: This event will take place on the Thames and consist of up to 1,000 boats assembled from across the UK, the Commonwealth and around the world. The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh will travel in the Royal Barge which will form the centrepiece of the flotilla.Find out more

Approximate timings are as follows:

14:30BST The Queen embarks the Royal barge, the Spirit of Chartwell, near Albert Bridge

16:15BST The Royal Barge comes alongside HMS President (Royal Naval Reserve Unit), near Tower Bridge

Monday 4 June, 2012
BBC Concert at Buckingham Palace: There will be a televised Diamond Jubilee Concert at Buckingham Palace with tickets being available to UK residents by public ballot. The musical programme for the concert is still being planned and is expected to feature British and Commonwealth musicians. Details on how to apply for the concert will be available in due course. This event is being organised by the BBC. Find out more

The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee Beacons: A network of 2,012 Beacons will be lit by communities and individuals throughout the United Kingdom, as well as the Channel Islands, the Isle of Man and the Commonwealth. As in 2002, The Queen will light the National Beacon. Find out more

Approximate timings are as follows:

19:30BST Diamond Jubilee Concert at Buckingham Palace begins

After 22:30BST The Queen lights the National Beacon outside Buckingham Palace

Tuesday 5 June, 2012
On Tuesday 5 June, the Diamond Jubilee weekend will culminate with a day of celebrations in central London, including a service at St Pauls Cathedral followed by two receptions, a lunch at Westminster Hall, a Carriage Procession to Buckingham Palace and finally a Balcony appearance, Flypast, and Feu de Joie. Find out more.

Download the Order of Service

Approximate timings are as follows:

10:15BST The Queen leaves Buckingham Palace by car

10:30-11.30BST Service of Thanksgiving at St Pauls

12.30BST The Queen travels by car from Mansion House to the Palace of Westminster

14:20BST Carriage Procession from Westminster Hall to Buckingham Palace commences

Approximately 15:25BST Royal Family appear on the Balcony at Buckingham Palace

Members of theMedia seeking accreditation for these events should visit: https://accred.compicweb.com/diamondjubilee