Wales: EXERCISE – Coastguard Rescue Teams, RNLI lifeboats, RAF search & rescue helicopter, Police, Fire & Ambulance attend major incident in Cardiff Bay – 020414 1100z

(Photo: Barry Coastguard)

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(Photo: )

EX DRAIG: INCIDENT IN CARDIFF BAY

EXERCISE: PLEASE NOTE THIS IS FOR AN  TESTING THE EMERGENCY RESPONSE IN CARDIFF BAY
Swansea Coastguard was first contacted just before 11am this morning to reports that two boats had collided in Cardiff Bay.
The Penarth, Barry and Chepstow Coastguard Rescue Teams have been sent to the scene, along with the Penarth and Barry RNLI lifeboats and the RAF search and rescue helicopter from RMB Chivenor. Police, fire and ambulance crews are also in attendance.
At this time, it is not clear how many people were on board and the extent of any injuries. A search and rescue mission is ongoing.” – MCA

“Barry Coastguard at Cardiff Bay with all emergency services, carrying out major incident training. With Penarth and Chepstow Coastguard . Air sea rescue have been tasked to assist in a mock rescue in the Bay” – Barry Coastguard



Two rescued from yacht Little Vixen as it broke up on Southwold Harbour’s North Pier, by Southwold Lifeboat – Published 12 Aug 2012 1743 GMT/UTC

The yacht Little Vixen breaking up against the North Pier of Southwold Harbour.

Two crew had been washed off the boat at the point of capsize, and were attended to by medically trained RNLI crew before the arrival of coastguard and ambulance services.  – Southwold Lifeboat

RNLI lifeboats have launched a total of 126 times this weekend to save the lives of people in danger at sea.

Teenager rescued from 100m hill fall

A teenage boy has been rescued and taken to hospital after reportedly falling 100 metres down a steep hill in Shropshire this afternoon.

(Photo: West Midlands Ambulance Service)

 

The incident happened on the Wrekin in Telford at 12.45pm (Friday). A rapid response vehicle, a paramedic area support officer, an ambulance and paramedics from the Trust’s Hazardous Area Response Team (HART) were sent to the scene.

A West Midlands Ambulance Service spokeswoman said: “The responder paramedic arrived at the top of the hill to find the 13 year old boy approximately 100 metres below on the steep hillside. The responder requested assistance from HART and the fire service given the difficult location of the boy.

“The boy sustained a bump to his head and a suspected fractured ankle. Crews gave the boy pain relief to stabilise his condition before carefully immobilising his leg with a splint. The boy was then placed into a basket stretcher and pulled up to the top of the hill using a rope system by the fire service, with help and support from HART and ambulance staff.

“Once at the top, HART utilised its all-terrain vehicle ‘Polaris’ to transport the boy back down the hill to the awaiting ambulance. The boy was then taken to Princess Royal Hospital for further treatment.”

Emergencies, Twitter & Twitcident

Very often folks learn about major accidents and other problems from Twitter first, but those that need to know don’t have the time to sort through this sea of data.

They need a web filter. Twitcident( http://twitcident.com/?kid=8W2W ) does that – once it knows of an incident or potentially dangerous situation developing, it starts monitoring tweets about that incident or situation, together with tweets from the public. However, it filters out much of the rubbish that clogs Twitter, such as @ replies. It zeros in on finding key information.
The general public will find it useful too.
One example, where Goaty’s News had some involvement, perhaps demonstrates the need for this sort of intervention….
During last year’s riots in London & other British cities, Twitter was ablaze. Both the good & bad in people surfaced. Misinformation can spread like wildfire. Some purposely mislead, whilst others were simply led astray & retweeted. There were even calls from certain quarters for Twitter & Facebook to be shut down, during periods of unrest & riot.
Luckily, there were trusted sources tweeting, the emergency services, journalists (notably, Paul Lewis & Neal Mann) & sources deemed reliable from previous incidents.
Although not perfect, Goaty’s News will always try to help dispell misinformation on social media, whenever possible & believes that inspired projects such as Twitcident, that work for the common good, are well overdue.

Here is more on Twitcident: http://www.wired.com/gadgetlab/2012/04/twitcident-fights-fire-with-twitter/

From The Verge: http://www.theverge.com/2012/4/15/2948447/twitcident-emergency-twitter-crowd-source-crisis-management?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter

BBC World on Twitcident: “Bringing order out of chaos” http://blog.twitcident.com/bbc-world-service-interview-about-twitcident

Twelve people evacuated, 4 police officers & ambulance crew quarantined after toxic chemical suicide

Twelve people were evacuated from a South End apartment building and four Boston police officers and an ambulance crew were taken to a hospital after a woman committed suicide Monday night inside an apartment by ingesting a toxic chemical, fire officials said.

Boston Deputy Fire Chief Steve Dunbar said at the hazmat scene that the woman ingested the chemical on the first floor of 676 Mass. Ave. at about 9 p.m. and was later pronounced dead at Boston Medical Center.

He said four police officers and the ambulance team of two EMS workers were being quarantined at BMC to determine whether they were affected by the substance.

Dunbar said a relative of the woman, whose name and age he did not know, reported that the victim told her she ingested a chemical and asked that her cats be taken care of.

The deputy fire chief said the victim appeared to be young, but he could not be more specific. He said the woman is believed to have ingested sodium azide, a chemical used to make airbags. “But it can metabolize into some kind of cyanide,” Dunbar said, adding that the woman died about an hour or two after ingesting the substance. He said at about 12:20 a.m. Tuesday that crews were preparing to reenter the apartment building to see if it presented a safety risk, a process expected to take a few hours. Dunbar also said the officers and EMS workers who were quarantined did not appear to be showing signs of being adversely affected by the chemical.

Tuesday, 10 April, 2012 at 17:05 UTC RSOE